×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

The Arts and Crafts Garden
     

The Arts and Crafts Garden

by Sarah Rutherford
 

See All Formats & Editions

The Arts and Crafts Movement espoused values of simplicity, craftsmanship and beauty quite counter to Victorian and Edwardian industrialism. Though most famous for its architecture, furniture and ornamental work, between the 1890s and the 1930s the movement also produced gardens all over Britain whose designs, redolent of a lost golden era, had worldwide influence.

Overview

The Arts and Crafts Movement espoused values of simplicity, craftsmanship and beauty quite counter to Victorian and Edwardian industrialism. Though most famous for its architecture, furniture and ornamental work, between the 1890s and the 1930s the movement also produced gardens all over Britain whose designs, redolent of a lost golden era, had worldwide influence. These designs, by luminaries such as Gertrude Jekyll and Sir Edwin Lutyens, were engaging and romantic combinations of manor-house garden formalism and the naive charms of the cottage garden – but from formally clipped topiary to rugged wild borders, nothing was left to chance. Sarah Rutherford here explores the winding paths and meticulously shaped hedges, the gazebos and gateways, the formal terraces and the billowing border plantings that characterised the Arts and Crafts garden, and directs readers and gardeners to where they can visit and be inspired by these beautiful works of art.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780747813453
Publisher:
Bloomsbury USA
Publication date:
07/10/2013
Series:
Shire Library , #771
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
80
File size:
26 MB
Note:
This product may take a few minutes to download.

Related Subjects

Read an Excerpt

Excerpt from The Arts and Crafts Garden
 
Sculpture showed off the taste, wealth and education of the owner. It was not often lavishly used in Arts and Crafts gardens, and was usually restricted to one or two key pieces placed at focal points around the house; larger collections could be spread throughout the garden. The extent of the use of sculpture was usually dependent upon the wealth of the owner. Traditional figures and decorative subjects were mostly favored. Urns were common; also fountains and particularly masks. Lead was popular as a traditional material that withstood the British climate well, making it suitable for ornamented water features and troughs, and it showcased British craftsmanship. Stone and composite stone pieces, offered by firms such as James Pulham & Son, were also popular.
Pots and tubs were carefully placed in singles and groups around the house and on terraces. Terracotta and stone were common materials; sizes and patterns varied.

Meet the Author

Sarah Rutherford is a Kew-trained gardener with an MA in the conservation of historic parks and gardens from York University. She worked for English Heritage assessing sites across England for the Register of Historic Parks and Gardens, becoming Head of the Register. She is now an enthusiastic freelance consultant researching and writing conservation plans for parks and gardens.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews