The Assassination of the Black Male Image

Overview

In Assassination of the Black Male Image, Hutchinson counters the popular racial and sexual stereotypes of black men. He argues that the black male image has been maligned and assaulted by academics, the press, and Hollywood, as well as some black rappers, comedians, feminists, filmmakers, and novelists. He accuses them of reinforcing and profiting from the stereotypes. Hutchinson traces the racial and sexual typecasting of African-American men during the past century, demonstrating that the perpetual ...
See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (16) from $1.99   
  • New (1) from $45.00   
  • Used (15) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$45.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(136)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

In Assassination of the Black Male Image, Hutchinson counters the popular racial and sexual stereotypes of black men. He argues that the black male image has been maligned and assaulted by academics, the press, and Hollywood, as well as some black rappers, comedians, feminists, filmmakers, and novelists. He accuses them of reinforcing and profiting from the stereotypes. Hutchinson traces the racial and sexual typecasting of African-American men during the past century, demonstrating that the perpetual crime-drugs-violence-dereliction image of African-American men has deep historic roots in America's racial past. He contends that racial and sexual stereotypes have frequently been skillfully minipulated by America's political and economic power brokers to deny rights and opportunities to African Americans.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
"The myth of the malevolent black male is based on a durable and time-resistant bedrock of myths, half-truths and lies," declares Hutchinson (The Presidential Betrayal of African-Americans). He criticizes media portrayals of black men, derisive code words used about black athletes and the media buzz over Waiting to Exhale's nasty portrayal of black men. Perhaps because the author is also a columnist and radio commentator, he skates briefly through his arguments; a few of his chapters (on Tina Turner, for example), stray from his thesis, and others include errors (The End of Racism did not become a bestseller). Hutchinson criticizes black males for using the word nigger. However, though he argues credibly that black violence is the product of a violent and poverty-ridden society, Hutchinson doesn't acknowledge that the problem of the underclass is both an economic and a spiritual/behavioral issue. Still, his advice is helpful. He suggests that readers persuade the media to cover the full spectrum of black life, not merely crime/violence/"hood" stories; he urges them to boycott music, videos and comedians, etc. who demean black images and to buy "positive black-oriented products" from black-owned stores and organizations. Author tour. (Sept.)
Library Journal
Hutchinson, a Los Angeles-based lecturer and commentator, shows that slanted standards manipulate how the world views black men and how black men view themselves. (LJ 10/1/96)
Kirkus Reviews
An African-American lecturer and commentator demands a more balanced portrayal of black men.

An earlier self-published version of this book by Hutchinson, who commented on the O.J. Simpson trial for CBS News, sold 30,000 copies, perhaps accounting for this breakthrough into a major publishing house (his previous books came out from small presses). But the first few chapters, each of which is really an independent essay, offer few clues to the volume's popularity. In a style reminiscent of the same Rush Limbaugh patter that he trashes in one of his essays, Hutchinson rails and hectors, ignores sources that do not support his theories, and interjects snide italicized asides. There is, however, a powerful cumulative effect to Hutchinson's writing that makes his central thesis difficult to dismiss. He argues that the overwhelming mass media image of black men is of evil incarnate, and that Americans—including many black women—are ready to pounce any time a black man slips up, from O.J. Simpson to Michael Jackson to Clarence Thomas to Louis Farrakhan. The vast majority of black men, who do not deal drugs, beat women, abandon their families, or evade employment, are virtually ignored. The scapegoating of black men for society's ills lets the government off the hook for economic policies destructive of blue- collar jobs; it also leads to disproportionate punishment of black lawbreakers, distorts public policy, deepens racial divides, and worst of all, becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy. If Americans think that all black men are stupid, he writes, "there's no need to build more schools." If all black men are seen as lazy, "there's no need to spend more on job and skills training and entrepreneurial programs."

Hutchinson demands that black men be transformed from the "universal bogeyman" to "human beings." His case is sometimes overstated but cannot easily be overlooked.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781881032113
  • Publisher: Middle Passage Press
  • Publication date: 5/1/1994
  • Pages: 184

Table of Contents

The Growth Industry in Black Male Mythology: An Overview 13
1 The Negro: A Beast ... or in the Image of God? 19
2 The Fine Art of Black Male Bashing 32
3 From Slavery to the Sports Arena 48
4 Doing the Wrong Thing by Spike 57
5 Thomas, Tyson, and Tall Tales 63
6 Ain't I a Nigger, Too? 79
7 The Way Things Ought Not to Be, Rush 88
8 Minister Farrakhan or Adolf Farrakhan? 95
9 Why Are They Waiting to Exhale? 101
10 No Thriller for Michael Jackson 114
11 What's Love Got to Do With It? More Than You Think 119
12 The War on Drugs Is a War on Black Males 123
13 The Other Boyz N the Hood 131
14 Ghetto Chic 142
15 Colin Powell: An American Journey or American Dilemma? 147
16 The Never-Ending Saga of O. J. Simpson 152
17 Countering the Assassination of the Black Male Image 162
America's Hidden Agenda Against Black Males: A Postscript 170
Notes 175
Bibliography 193
Index 197
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)