The Audubon Reader

( 5 )

Overview

This unprecedented anthology of John James Audubon’s lively and colorful writings about the American wilderness reintroduces the great artist and ornithologist as an exceptional American writer, a predecessor to Thoreau, Emerson, and Melville.

Audubon’s award-winning biographer, Richard Rhodes, has gathered excerpts from his journals, letters, and published works, and has organized them to appeal to general readers. Rhodes’s unobtrusive commentary frames a wide range of ...

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The Audubon Reader

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Overview

This unprecedented anthology of John James Audubon’s lively and colorful writings about the American wilderness reintroduces the great artist and ornithologist as an exceptional American writer, a predecessor to Thoreau, Emerson, and Melville.

Audubon’s award-winning biographer, Richard Rhodes, has gathered excerpts from his journals, letters, and published works, and has organized them to appeal to general readers. Rhodes’s unobtrusive commentary frames a wide range of selections, including Audubon’s vivid “bird biographies,” correspondence with his devoted wife, Lucy, journal accounts of dramatic river journeys and hunting trips with the Shawnee and Osage Indians, and a generous sampling of brief narrative episodes that have long been out of print—engaging stories of pioneer life such as "The Great Pine Swamp," “The Earthquake,” and “Kentucky Barbecue on the Fourth of July.” Full-color reproductions of sixteen of Audubon’s stunning watercolor illustrations accompany the text.

The Audubon Reader allows us to experience Audubon’s distinctive voice directly and provides a window into his electrifying encounter with early America: with its wildlife and birds, its people, and its primordial wilderness.

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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Pulitzer Prize-winning author Rhodes offers a companion volume to John James Audubon: The Making of an American, his 2004 biography of the artist, ornithologist, and writer, with this latest addition to the "Everyman's Library" series. Carefully chosen excerpts on North American birds and mammals from Audubon's journals, letters, and books provide a refreshing, intimate view of the man whose name is synonymous with birds. The selections are arranged chronologically, allowing the reader to follow the progress of Audubon's explorations from Florida to Labrador and his attempts to balance his devotion to family life with his passionate drive to produce the definitive 19th-century work on birds of North America. A select bibliography and 16 color illustrations of Audubon's bird paintings are included, along with an excellent chronology that places events in Audubon's life alongside cultural and historical highlights of the time. A distinctive collection despite some overlap with John James Audubon: Writings and Drawings (Library of America, 1999), this work is an essential purchase for public and academic libraries. (Index not seen.)-Maureen J. Delaney-Lehman, Lake Superior State Univ. Lib., Sault Ste. Marie, MI Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 24, 2015

     Rules | Poppystar

    Realisticness is key for a thriving clan. T

     Rules | Poppystar<p>Realisticness is key for a thriving clan. This means no winged cats, no powers, no crazy colors, etc. . . Anything that is not mentioned in the books is not allowed in HollyClan. Also, godmodding isn't allowed. Concerning medicine cats, only THEY may heal. Only they should have the knowledge of healing besides the very basic herbs. Also, leaders and medicine cats MUST be active. If they are missing for more than two weeks, they will be replaced. If they return, they can settle it with the new leader or medicine cat. All parts of the Warrior Code must be upheld at all times. All new cats or outsiders must first go through the next result (the HollyClan border).</p>
    <p>For clarification, the warriors terminology will be listed below:<br />Crowfood or crow-food- A dead prey animal that has begun to rot; also can be used as an insult.<br />Fresh-kill- A recently killed prey animal caught for the purpose of consumption. Fresh-kill is hunted by warriors and apprentices, and sometimes elders, and placed on the fresh-kill pile or brought to the elders. Elders, kits, queens, and sick cats eat first, then warriors and apprentices. Extras stay in the fresh-kill pile.<br />Hunting Patrol- A group of cts hunting for fresh-kill to bring back for their clan to eat. May fight if there ar trespassers.<br />Loner- A cat that lives by itself and doesn't defend its territory.<br />Rogue- A usually hostile cat who does not have a permanent home, roams around, and does not care about crossing clan boundaries.<br />Sharing Tongues- Cats grooming each other while sharing the latest gossip. A cat lies on the ground, talking, while the other grooms their fur, listening.<br />Snowmelt- A term used to describe slush or dirty, melted snow.<br />Newleaf- The season of spring.<br />Greenleaf- The season of summer.<br />Leaf-fall- The season of autumn or fall.<br />Leaf-bare- The season of winter.<br />Moon- The time between one full moon and the next, spanning about 29 days, a month.<br />Moonhigh- When the moon is the highest in the sky; about midnight.<br />Moonrise- The time when the moon rises.<br />Half-moon- About two weeks, half a month.<br />Quarter-moon- About a week.<br />Sunhigh- The point during the day when the sun is highest in the sky; noon.<br />Sunrise- One day in cat time. (i.e. One sunrise ago.)<br />Season- A quarter of a year in cat time. Four seasons equal a year.<br />Heartbeat- A split second.<br />Claw-moon- When the moon resembles the shape of an unsheathed claw, equivalent to crescent moon.<br />Sundown- Dusk.<br />Sunup- Dawn. However, Dawn is still used for example in the phrase &quot;Dawn Patrol.&quot;<br />Fox-length- About the length of a fox; approximately a yard. (80 cm)<br />Kittenstep or Kitstep- About the length of a kit's step; approximately an inch or a half inch. (1.25-2.5 cm)<br />Tail-length- About the length of a cat's tail; approximately a foot. (30 cm)<br />Rabbit Hop or Rabbit Length- About a foot and a half away. (45 cm)<br />Mouse-length- About two or three inchs (5-7.5 cm)<br />Pawstep- About the length of a grown cat's step, roughly six inches. (15 cm)<br />Tree-length- About the length of a tree; around 40 to 50 feet. (15 m)</p>
    <p>1 Week = 3 Moons.<br />An average, healthy pregnancy should last from three days to a week.<br />Newborn kits will be apprenticed after a week and a half  to two weeks.<br />Apprentices will be made warriors after about two weeks.<br />Warriors should retire between 60-84 moons.</p>
    <p>~ Poppystar, first leader of HollyClan</p>

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 21, 2015

    Portal ✧

    Hmm... how about... BloomClan? RabbitClan? LeafClan? SilverClan? BrightClan? OakClan? MistClan? PineClan? ShadeClan? SproutClan? CloverClan? StoneClan? MoonClan? NightClan? DayClan? SunClan? CloudClan? BlossomClan? TwigClan? ShimmerClan? FogClan? RockClan? LighningClan?

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 21, 2015

    Yew

    Ok

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 24, 2015

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 12, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

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