The Autobiography of Lincoln Steffens

Overview

Cultural Writing. Here is the autobiography of one of the world's first celebrity journalists: Lincoln Steffens (1866-1936), a man whose writing was so notorious that President Theodore Roosevelt coined a term for it—muckraking. THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF LINCOLN STEFFENS is the story of a cranky and brilliant reporter with a passion for examining the complex and contradictory conditions that breed corruption, poverty, and misery. As sch, this books is an antidote to the spin doctors, pundits, and talking heads who ...

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Overview

Cultural Writing. Here is the autobiography of one of the world's first celebrity journalists: Lincoln Steffens (1866-1936), a man whose writing was so notorious that President Theodore Roosevelt coined a term for it—muckraking. THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF LINCOLN STEFFENS is the story of a cranky and brilliant reporter with a passion for examining the complex and contradictory conditions that breed corruption, poverty, and misery. As sch, this books is an antidote to the spin doctors, pundits, and talking heads who discourage us from ever reading past a headline or challenging the status quo. Lincoln Steffens is an inspiration to all socially engaged citizens today. With an introduction by Thomas C. Leonard.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781597140164
  • Publisher: Heyday Books
  • Publication date: 9/20/2005
  • Series: A California Legacy Book Ser.
  • Pages: 882
  • Sales rank: 796,766
  • Product dimensions: 5.70 (w) x 8.62 (h) x 1.87 (d)

Table of Contents

Foreword xiii
Part I A Boy on Horseback
I When I Was an Angel 3
II My Savage Stage 11
III A Miserable, Merry Christmas 17
IV A Boy on Horseback 24
V The Sporting Age 34
VI A Painter and a Page 42
VII The Neely Farm 51
VIII A Prince and a Cowboy 59
IX I Get Religion 68
X I Become a Hero, Save a Life 77
XI I Get a Colt to Break In 86
XII I Become a Drunkard 94
XIII Napoleon 101
XIV All Through with Heroism 106
XV Preparing for College 111
XVI I Go to College 117
XVII I Become a Student 124
XVIII Berlin: Philosophy and Music 129
XIX Heidelberg: There Is No Ethics 134
XX Munich: There Are No Artists 140
XXI Leipzig: Music, Science, Love 146
XXII Over the Alps to Paris 153
XXIII Paris, London-Home 159
Part II Seeing New York First
I I Become a Reporter 169
II Wall Street 179
III Bulls and Bears 187
IV The Police 197
V Clubs, Clubbers, and Clubbed 208
VI Dr. Parkhurst's Vice Crusade 215
VII The Underworld 221
VIII Bosses: Political and Financial 231
IX The Ghetto 239
X The Lexow Police Investigation 247
XI Roosevelt and Reform 255
XII Schmittberger: An Honest Policeman 266
XIII Saving Schmittberger 274
XIV I Make a Crime Wave 285
XV I Inherit a Fortune 292
XVI I Become a Capitalist 302
XVII Remaking a Newspaper 311
XVIII A Happy Newspaper Staff 320
XIX Getting Old Bill Devery 327
XX The Cuban War and T.R. 338
XXI Colonel Roosevelt as Governer 344
Part III Muckraking
I From Newspaper to Magazine 357
II St. Louis, a City Inside Out 365
III The Shame of Minneapolis 374
IV I Achieve Fame and Something Better 385
V The Shamelessness of St. Louis 392
VI Pittsburgh: Hell with the Lid Lifted 399
VII Philadelphia: A Defeated People 407
VIII The Dying Boss 416
IX Chicago: An Example of Reform 422
X New York: Good Government 430
XI Cos Cob: An Art Colony 436
XII The Shame of the States: Missouri 443
XIII Illinois: The Progressive Movement 450
XIV Wisconsin and Bob La Follette 454
XV Rhode Island: The Good Old American Stock 464
XVI Ohio: A Tale of Two Cities 470
XVII The City On a Hill 477
XVIII Cincinnati and Boss Cox 482
XIX Some Theories: Big Business and Privileged Business 489
XX New Jersey: A Trust Factory 495
XXI T.R. as President 502
XXII The President Is Shaved 509
XXIII Ben Lindsey: The Kids' Judge 516
XXIV Muckraking Myself-A Little 521
XXV Life Insurance 527
XXVI Making the "American Magazine" 535
XXVII Timber Frauds in Oregon 544
XXVIII San Francisco: A Labor Government 552
XXIX How Hard It Is to Keep Things Wrong 561
XXX Los Angeles and the Apple 570
XXXI Free-Lancing in Washington, D.C. 575
XXXII Wall Street Again 583
XXXIII Cubs: Walter Lippmann, for Example 592
XXXIV A Successful Failure 598
XXXV The Muck I Raked in Boston 604
XXXVI "Boston 1915" 612
XXXVII Principals and Heelers 621
Part IV Revolution
I Playing with Reds and Liberals in New York 631
II Experimenting with Philanthropy and Education 641
III Seeing Europe with Business Men-Greenwich Village 648
IV Dynamite 658
V Settling with Dynamiters' Case. An Experiment with "Big, Bad Men" 670
VI The Churches Decide Against Christianity 679
VII I Become a Goat 690
VIII Europe: A Procession of Nations Marching to War 702
IX Mexico: The First Revolution 712
X Carranza and Madero 722
XI Wilson and Mexico 733
XII To Russia: A Second Revolution 741
XIII The Russian Revolution 747
XIV Kerenski 757
XV Kerenski to Wilson 764
XVI Preparing for Peace 773
XVII The Peacemaker 778
XVIII The Bullitt Mission to Moscow 790
XIX The Peace that Was No Peace 803
XX Mussolini 812
XXI Experimental Europe 821
XXII A European View of America 830
Part V Seeing America at Last
I The Dynamiters Again 841
II The New United States 849
III Prohibition: A Hang-Over 858
IV Prophecy 865
V Falling Out of Bed 872
Index 875
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