BN.com Gift Guide

The Balkan Wars: Conquest, Revolution and Retribution from the Ottoman Era to the Twentieth Century and Beyond

Overview

When it comes to the Balkans, most people quickly become lost in the quagmire of struggle and intractable hatred that consumes that ancient land today. Many assume that the genesis of the past ten years of atrocity in the region might have had something to do with Tito and his repressive Yugoslav regime, or perhaps with the assassination of Franz Ferdinand in 1914. The seeds were really planted much, much earlier, on a desolate plain in Kosovo in 1389, when the Serbian Prince Lazar and his army clashed with and ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (19) from $1.99   
  • New (3) from $12.99   
  • Used (16) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$12.99
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(75)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
Hardcover New 0465027318 Never Read-may have minor shelf or handling wear to the cover or edges-may have price sticker on the cover or price inside cover-publishers mark-Good ... Copy-I ship FAST with FREE tracking! ! Read more Show Less

Ships from: Waresboro, GA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$30.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(5)

Condition: New
New 2002 first edition, first printing hardcover and dust jacket in excellent condition. Protective mylar cover. 1.06 x 9.33 x 6.29 Inches 320 pages

Ships from: Arlington, TX

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$60.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(194)

Condition: New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

When it comes to the Balkans, most people quickly become lost in the quagmire of struggle and intractable hatred that consumes that ancient land today. Many assume that the genesis of the past ten years of atrocity in the region might have had something to do with Tito and his repressive Yugoslav regime, or perhaps with the assassination of Franz Ferdinand in 1914. The seeds were really planted much, much earlier, on a desolate plain in Kosovo in 1389, when the Serbian Prince Lazar and his army clashed with and were defeated by the Ottoman forces of Sultan Murad I.In this riveting new history of the Balkan peoples, André Gerolymatos explores how ancient events engendered cultural myths that evolved over time, gaining psychic strength in the collective consciousnesses of Orthodox Christians and Muslims alike. In colorful detail, we meet the key figures that instigated and perpetuated these myths-including the assassin/heroes Milos Obolic and Gavrilo Princip and the warlord Ali Pasha. This lively survey of centuries of strife finally puts the modern conflicts in Bosnia and Kosovo into historical context, and provides a long overdue account of the origins of ethnic hatred and warmongering in this turbulent land.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
What is it about the area which encompasses Macedonia, Albania, Croatia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and Yugoslavia that has condemned it to suffer through centuries of warfare and strife? Can the ongoing struggle that's stretched from the ancient Ottoman Empire to the "ethnic cleansing" of the 1990's ever be halted? Historian Andre Gerolymatos takes a searching look at this troubled region.
Kirkus Reviews
A useful historical overview of "a centuries-long theater of the macabre." Gerolymatos (Hellenic Studies/Simon Fraser Univ.), a specialist on guerrilla warfare and espionage in the Balkans and Greece, examines the problems of religion, nationalism, and romanticized history in the ever-smoldering southeastern corner of Europe. Western policy analysts, he writes, mostly ignored these three potent forces after the collapse of Communism in the Soviet Union and the former Yugoslavia, only to be surprised by the virulent civil war and splintering of the peninsula in ethnic-based states that followed. "Post-Cold War Europe and North America," he remarks, "are at a complete loss to understand why these small countries are hostages to the past and seem so willing to fight the same battles all over again." Some of those battles loom large in the Balkan mind but have been overlooked or forgotten in Western history; one, which Gerolymatos carefully reconstructs, is the assassination of the Austro-Hungarian archduke Franz Ferdinand at the hands of a Serbian anarchist in 1914, an event that sparked WWI. Ferdinand had it coming, Gerolymatos suggests, if only because he ventured into Sarajevo on the anniversary of the 1389 Battle of Kosovo, when Ottoman Turks slaughtered the flower of Serbian knighthood and opened the peninsula to Muslim domination for the next five centuries. Such resounding defeats and massacres have "shaped at least part of the identity and commonality of each nation, tribe, or group in the Balkans." One of the most recent was the Serbian loss of Kosovo and Bosnia to UN and NATO forces, making them "de facto satellites of the United States"-and perhaps candidates for annexation into aGreater Albania, the thought of which troubles non-Albanians throughout the region. An even-handed survey for anyone bewildered by recent events in a once-remote pocket of Europe. Author tour
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780465027316
  • Publisher: Basic Books
  • Publication date: 4/3/2002
  • Pages: 320
  • Lexile: 1510L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 6.29 (w) x 9.33 (h) x 1.06 (d)

Table of Contents

Preface
Map of the Balkan Peninsula, 1912-1913
Chronology
Introduction: Memory of Terror 1
Ch. 1 Assassination, Martyrdom, and Betrayal 7
Ch. 2 The Ottoman Era: The Birth of Balkan Mythology 47
Ch. 3 Bandits with Attitude 85
Ch. 4 Ethnicity versus the Nation-State 120
Ch. 5 Fire, Sword, and Blood: The Birth of the Balkan State 159
Ch. 6 Intractable Boundaries: Balkan Battlefields 195
Epilogue: A Wedding in Sarajevo, 1992 233
Notes 247
Bibliography 281
Index 289
Read More Show Less

Introduction

MEMORY

OF TERROR

Q


Roksanda Petrovic resided at 14 Decembra Street, just south of Slavija Square, in Belgrade. Her building was in the Crveni Krst neighborhood of the Vracar municipality, just three bus stops away from the center of the city. For many years, she enjoyed the view of the city from her apartment on the seventh floor. Petrovic could easily see the northern towns, including New Belgrade. From her balcony, she could watch people strolling on the streets of downtown Belgrade, going about their daily business. The neighborhood, defined by single and two-story houses _and few high-rises, was characteristic of the architecture of postwar Yugoslavia; it was generally a good place to raise a family or, as in the case of Petrovic, retire in tranquillity and relative comfort.On March 24, 1999, at 11 p.m., Petrovic was resting comfortably on her sofa when an air-raid siren initiated what would shortly become a night of terror. The sudden warning took her by surprise, and for a few seconds she imagined the high-pitched sound was a gigantic scream for help. Then her blood froze; reality had quickly set in. Petrovic rushed to her TV, turning it on just as the news anchor, with deliberate calmness, told people to shut down all electrical equipment, lock their doors and windows, and immediately find the nearest shelter. Almost as an afterthought, the visibly nervous man advised that sirens would also announce the end of the strike.Instinctively, Petrovic stepped out onto her balcony and looked up, listening for the warplanes. The only sound that came back was her heartbeat. The siren continued wailing as she stood alone on the balcony, shaking with fear. When she regained control of herself, she went back inside and ran to her neighbors' apartment, only to catch them as they were closing their door, awkwardly holding blankets and bags of valuables. They tried to convince her, almost pleaded with her, to join them in the basement. But Petrovic refused. The thought of being trapped in a hermetically sealed space deep in the ground was more terrifying than the unknown and still-silent enemy high above.Caught between two horrifying alternatives, she returned to her apartment and broke down in tears. But curiosity again forced her to the balcony. This time, she looked at the ground below and could see people running in panic, shouting and gesturing at passersby. The spectacle convinced her that the street was not an option. Frightened and confused, she noticed that the kitchen table was made out of a single piece of thick and strong wood; it seemed the only avenue of protection, and Petrovic slowly slipped underneath with the illusion of safety.A few moments later, she could hear large thuds in the distance. The sound slowly came closer, and each thud became more intense with each passing second. Suddenly, the thuds metamorphosed into explosions. The sound of the detonations became louder and more clear, and she felt the building shake, or at least she believed the structure was beginning to vibrate. Again curiosity overcame fear, and Petrovic crawled out from under her table and peered down on the city. The Belgrade landscape was punctuated by thick columns of black smoke mixed with flames, and the sky was littered with streaks of brilliant light as anti-aircraft fire exploded in midair. Now she could hear the whining drone of the warplanes, but the machines of destruction continued to remain invisible to the naked eye.Once again the voice from the television set warned that no one should be out until the air raid was over. Petrovic retreated under the table, this time too terrified to move. She was obsessed with the thought that she would get caught in a burning building. She prayed to God that if a bomb fell, she would be killed instantly and not suffer the slow decomposition of a lingering death among the flames and rubble.Petrovic lost all track of time, and as the noise tapered off, she edged her way back to the balcony and was astonished to see that Belgrade was surrounded by a ring of fire and a wall of thick black smoke. In that surreal moment, the sound of the telephone brought her back to reality. She returned to the room, picked up the receiver, and heard her relatives from Canada, but she could not find her voice. They tried to calm her, assured her that all would be well. But Petrovic knew, just as the Canadians on the other end of the telephone line knew, that nothing could be done. It is the irony of contemporary technology in general - and the war in Yugoslavia in particular - that while some Canadians are dropping thousands of tons of bombs on a city, others can be talking on the telephone with those on the receiving end.For the next seventy-eight days, Petrovic made her home under the kitchen table during the air raids, praying for deliverance or a merciful death. Her fate depended upon a NATO pilot miles above her home. If he shifted his targeting mechanism just slightly, her world would crash down around her, perhaps leaving the kitchen table as a temporary tombstone.But Petrovic survived the NATO attack, and she eventually even managed to join her relatives in Vancouver.1 She plans, nonetheless, to return home to Belgrade and resume living among the everyday surroundings that elevate life above mere existence. After all, home is a place where someone like Petrovic can speak her own language, be near her friends, and live in the comfort of physical familiarity. The tragedy of Yugoslavia is fundamentally a struggle to achieve security within a common physical space, language, religion, culture, and history. The NATO bombing was one act in a centuries-long theater of the macabre that has characterized war and violence in the Balkans and elsewhere. Q If wars are what define the nature of a society at its worst, then the Balkans offer nothing new to the history of warfare in Europe - or anywhere else, for that matter. What does make the Balkan wars so striking, however, is that they have all been fought over the same problems: nationalism and religion. These are not new or exclusive Balkan phenomena, of course, but inexplicably they have appeared anew at the end of the millennium. Post-Cold War Europe and North America are at a complete loss to understand why these small countries are hostages to the past and seem so willing to fight the same battles all over again. In fact, most Western policy analysts had initially almost refused to consider the role of history in the Balkan crises, and they underestimated the forces of nationalism and religion after the collapse of the Communist system. After all, shouldn't half a century of Communist rule have toned down national consciousness and, at the very least, extinguished any vestiges of religious fervor? Indeed, some Balkan writers have attempted to explain the atrocities that resulted from the breakup of Yugoslavia as a recent experience and not as a Balkan legacy.But if we want to comprehend the bloodstained fate of the modern Balkans, it is necessary to understand the impact and influence that war and its mythology have had on the region in the past. In fact, the history of the Balkan states is replete with heroes, villains, and most important, martyrs who offer an example of self-sacrifice for each succeeding generation.Today, the very word "Balkans" conjures up images of intrigue, war, and human suffering on a scale abhorrent to Western society. To some people, the Balkan countries lack a clear Western orientation and carry far too much cultural baggage to belong in the European club. Western leaders refer to the region as the back door to Europe, the Balkan powder keg, or Europe's doorstep. What these euphemisms hide is, perhaps, the wish that the Balkans were located anywhere other than in Europe.The Europe of today needs to move past its bloody history, and the events in the Balkans are a reminder of a previous dark age of war, mass killing, and destruction. The political, cultural, and economic development of the Balkan countries was interrupted and diverted by the Ottoman conquest in the fifteenth century. The five hundred years of Turkish occupation that followed suppressed the evolution of Balkan societies, so they failed to keep pace with the rest of Europe and North America. In effect, the march of European history and civilization skipped past, and the Renaissance, the Age of Enlightenment, and the Industrial Revolution made little impression on the region. As a result, the Balkan states emerged very late as modern societies and have lagged far behind the technologically advanced West.The modern Balkans have captured the imagination and indignation of North Americans and Western Europeans because the atrocities there are taking place now and not half a century ago. But at the heart of all the Balkan wars is the clarion call of ethnic hatred served up as cultural heritage. The Balkan past is littered with the tribalism, ethnic nationalism, warmongering, mythmaking, and self-serving symbolism of oppression that scar most societies in transition, in the past as well as the present.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)