×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

The Battle of Olustee, 1864: The Final Union Attempt to Seize Florida
  • Alternative view 1 of The Battle of Olustee, 1864: The Final Union Attempt to Seize Florida
  • Alternative view 2 of The Battle of Olustee, 1864: The Final Union Attempt to Seize Florida
     

The Battle of Olustee, 1864: The Final Union Attempt to Seize Florida

by Robert P. Broadwater
 

When the Civil War began in 1861, Florida—although the third state to secede from the Union—was of little strategic importance to North or South. By the end of 1863, this position had changed dramatically. For the struggling Confederacy, Florida had become a crucial source of supplies, most especially for the troops in Savannah and Charleston. President

Overview

When the Civil War began in 1861, Florida—although the third state to secede from the Union—was of little strategic importance to North or South. By the end of 1863, this position had changed dramatically. For the struggling Confederacy, Florida had become a crucial source of supplies, most especially for the troops in Savannah and Charleston. President Lincoln, soon to be seeking re-election and facing immense dissatisfaction due to the course which the war had taken, was desperately seeking some method of remedying his political situation. Bringing a reconstructed Florida back into the Union, with delegates who he hoped would be friendly to the Republican cause, seemed to be an ideal solution. Thus the Union launched a last-minute endeavor to regain control of Florida, an effort that culminated in the Battle of Olustee.

Compiled from primary sources such as diaries and journals, this work tells the story of the failed Union attempt to wrest control of eastern and central Florida away from the Confederacy. From the legislature to the battlefield, it details maneuvers military and political that went into the Florida campaign. The main focus of the work is the Battle of Olustee, or Ocean Pond, as it was known in the South. One of the bloodiest battles of the war with inordinately high casualties (171/2 percent for the Confederates, 35 percent for the Union), this conflict took place in February 1864 between troops commanded by Union General Truman Seymour and Confederate General Joseph Finegan. Little more than a bloody stalemate between generals who lacked significant military experience, the battle nevertheless decisively ended Union hopes of regaining Florida. Appendices provide details on the opposing armies, a list of casualties by unit and enlistment of black troops by state. Contemporary photographs and an index are also included.

Editorial Reviews

The Civil War News
solid
The Nymas Review
"very readable, comprehensive...some excellent coverage of Union black troops...a good account"

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780786425419
Publisher:
McFarland & Company, Incorporated Publishers
Publication date:
07/12/2006
Pages:
224
Sales rank:
908,882
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.70(d)

Meet the Author

Robert P. Broadwater has written more than 25 books of military history and more than 100 magazine articles dealing with the American Civil War and the Revolutionary War. He lives in Bellwood, Pennsylvania.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews