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BBC Sessions
     

The BBC Sessions

by The Who
 

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Once upon a time, rock 'n' roll bands -- even those helmed by serious artistes like Pete Townshend -- weren't so all-fired precious about messing about in the studio, a fact well-documented by the ongoing BBC Sessions series. This lovingly-compiled volume may be the best yet, chronicling as it does the development of the 'oo from

Overview

Once upon a time, rock 'n' roll bands -- even those helmed by serious artistes like Pete Townshend -- weren't so all-fired precious about messing about in the studio, a fact well-documented by the ongoing BBC Sessions series. This lovingly-compiled volume may be the best yet, chronicling as it does the development of the 'oo from simple purveyors of Maximum R&B to arguably the most dynamic rock band on the planet. Throughout a couple of dozen songs, the Who try on a passel of guises, from sweet soul slingers ("Dancin' in the Streets") to pop purists ("La La Lies") to brooding sages ("The Seeker"). The most fascinating aspect, however, is the on-display evolution of songs that would appear -- sometimes in drastically different form -- on official releases. The BBC versions of "Happy Jack" and "Substitute" (presented here in two different forms) are sure to catch the ear of even the most jaded classic rock listener -- as are the witty, wacky radio jingles the band crafted out of "My Generation" and "Boris the Spider." It's a must for diehards and a fascinating place for new believers to get an answer to the question "Who are you?"

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Richie Unterberger
A fine compilation of 1965-73 BBC performances, the majority of the tracks hailing from 1965-67, although some are drawn from 1970 and 1973. As one of the best live bands ever, the Who as expected come through pretty well in the live-in-the-studio environment, although the arrangements usually stick close to the records. Most of the songs were done by the group for studio releases as well, but there are a few covers that they never put on their albums or singles at the time, making this essential for the fan. Those numbers include the obscure James Brown tune "Just You and Me, Darling," "Dancing in the Street," "Good Lovin'," and "Leaving Here" (although a mid-1960s studio version of that last song was eventually released). Of the other tracks, particularly worthwhile are "Anyway, Anyhow, Anywhere," with its extensive feedback solo, quite a challenge to do live in May 1965; "The Good's Gone," which has a fuzz solo not on the studio version; and the 1970 performance of "Shakin' All Over," which might be the best rendition of that concert staple that they ever did. This does not have a few BBC songs that have shown up on bootlegs; particularly unfortunate exclusions are "So Sad About Us," "Summertime Blues," and their 1966 cover of the Everly Brothers' "Man with Money."
Rolling Stone - Arion Berger
...more than anything, The BBC Sessions highlights how mad, bad and dangerous the Who were in 1965.

Product Details

Release Date:
02/15/2000
Label:
Mca
UPC:
0008811196028
catalogNumber:
111960

Related Subjects

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Who   Primary Artist
Roger Daltrey   Vocals
Pete Townshend   Keyboards,Vocals,Guitar (Baritone),Group Member
Keith Moon   Snare Drums,Group Member
John Entwistle   Bass Guitar,Vocals

Technical Credits

James Brown   Composer
Johnny Kidd   Composer
Pete Townshend   Composer
Bill Curbishley   Executive Producer
Lamont Dozier   Composer
Eddie Holland   Composer
Brian Holland   Composer
Bernie Andrews   Producer
Michael Appleton   Producer
Paul Williams   Producer
Andie Airfix   Artwork
Robert Rosenberg   Executive Producer
Art Kane   Cover Photo
Bill Bebb   Producer
Brian Willey   Producer
Jimmy Grant   Producer

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