×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

The Beam: Season One
     

The Beam: Season One

4.3 7
by Sean Platt, Johnny B. Truant
 

See All Formats & Editions

A Sci-Fi political thriller set in a terrifyingly real future.

When all of humanity is connected, the center of the Web is the seat of true power.

In a century, the world’s old political borders have dissolved. At the center of what remains of civilization sits the NAU, a nation ruled by two political parties: Enterprise, the

Overview

A Sci-Fi political thriller set in a terrifyingly real future.

When all of humanity is connected, the center of the Web is the seat of true power.

In a century, the world’s old political borders have dissolved. At the center of what remains of civilization sits the NAU, a nation ruled by two political parties: Enterprise, the sink-or-swim party where each party member has no one else to blame for their starvation or astronomical wealth, and Directorate, whose members have a guaranteed safety net but can never rise above their station.

Every six years, an election determines the course of the NAU’s future. The process is called Shift, and the next one is coming soon. With humanity intertwined by way of the Beam -- a hyper-advanced version of the Internet that serves every whim and need -- Shift is the be-all and the end-all. More than an electoral method, it is the future’s political discourse..

In the midst of the country’s tumultuous politics, certain players are making their own moves. Doc, a black-market nanoenhancement vendor, has caught wind of a disturbing trend of enhancements among his clientele. Nicolai, political speechwriter for the head of Directorate, struggles to find his independence in a life that is supposed to be devoted to the Party, all the while unaware of his own terrifying connection to the Beam. And Kai, an escort and assassin as lethal as she is flexible, becomes embroiled in the machinations of her top clients — because after all, the political elite choose only the best to warm their sheets at night.

And through it all, a shadowy group is pulling strings behind the scenes, guiding Shift exactly where they want it to go. Their identities are unknown to all but a few, and anyone who stumbles upon them by accident — or, worse, learns their true goal — is swiftly disposed of. But if their power goes unchecked, their cloak-and-dagger actions will shape the fate of millions for years to come ...

Plug your mind into The Beam. It's been waiting for you.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781629550725
Publisher:
Sterling and Stone
Publication date:
12/17/2015
Pages:
512
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 1.31(d)

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

The Beam: Season One 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
AudiobookReviewer More than 1 year ago
The synopsis for this book doesn’t do it justice. It’s only one nano connection in the broad spectrum that is The Beam. Whether the topic is politics, technology, or the backstory of The Beam, the plot is always moving forward. In fact, it’s so chock full of constantly evolving plot lines and subplots that if you stop reading for too long, you need to really take a few minutes to remember where you were. Because of that and its addictive nature, this is a book best read binge-style. The characters are varied, ranging from a famous singer to political leaders to hippie rebels and beyond. You won’t find yourself wishing there was more diversity, and the character development is done slowly and carefully. It felt as if the technology introduced throughout the book, including The Beam itself, was its own character, with its own backstory, development, and mysteries. The Beam’s personification put this book well beyond the usual dystopian sci-fi bounds and dips into literary fiction in an unexpected way. I was very impressed with that. The one disclaimer I have to give is that there are parts that seem like the authors wrote them separately and didn’t review each other’s work – they seem to overlap in ways that don’t fit. Be patient. At first I thought there was some huge editing oversight, but later on I saw everything come together and make sense. The audio talent is good and plentiful with 12 narrators of very different timbres and tones. I’ve seen in many reviews that the voice of Doc is the most criticized, and while I found Doc’s voice to take a little bit of getting used to, I grew fond of him quickly and looked forward to his narrations. I did, however, feel that there were far too many narrators. While I understand the parallel of an epic amount of narrators with an epic technology thriller series, the sheer volume of voice talent confused me, especially as new talent was introduced well into the book, and some voice talent read the same characters in ways different enough from other voice talents that I noticed and concentrated on the difference. Any facet of a book or audiobook that takes away from the writing is less than ideal, in my opinion. In true Platt and Truant style, The Beam ends in a way no one could guess and leaves you hanging on an uncertain yet satisfying set of facts. A set of facts that will make you read Season 2, which I’m about to start doing right now. Audiobook provided for review by the author. Please find this complete review and many others at audiobookreviewer dot com [If this review helped, please press YES. Thanks!]
ApplemanWA More than 1 year ago
This story really grabbed my attention- and as I read on (I am now up to the third book as of this writing) I have NOT been able to put it down! I am carrying my nook with me everywhere and reading this story in my in-between spare time, which is not normal for me. The characters are well defined but not overly so, the story-lines are interesting and actually believable (for science-fiction) and I have to say, you want to read this book!!!
Mindywan More than 1 year ago
Why, why, why, do authors feel it necessary to use the F word in stories? It's obscene, degrading, shows lack of respect for the reader, and doesn't add a particle of interest to the story. An otherwise good story is ruined by the profanity. I won't read another word of The Beam or another book by the author(s).
BrianBeerGod More than 1 year ago
This book really got me. I wasn’t sure what I was getting into in the beginning. I love science fiction novels, and I like television – so I guess I knew I was going to like it. But once I dove into the world, it was deep and immersive. The characters were so diverse (many of which were incredibly intricately interconnected), but you felt like you knew them. You felt for them, both good and bad. This was also a novel that makes you think. Yes, it’s put into the future a good ways, but I think that some of the things that the authors wrote about are definitely on their way to becoming true. This book made me shudder a few times over the near distant future. My one complaint was it felt a bit Steven King at points (which to me isn’t good – I always feel like he took 1-2 pages to explain what color the wall was). There was almost TOO much explanation of scenes that didn’t need to be there. This book could have been about three-quarters to half it’s length if the authors didn’t dive SO deeply into the world. But then again, some things would have been missed or not explained that some readers may love. I could see this being optioned into a mini-series or a full-blown television series, but due to the graphic language (and some acts) in the book — I would love to see it on HBO, Showtime or even Netflix so that they wouldn’t feel the need to change the ways that the characters spoke and acted.
MichaelLaRonn More than 1 year ago
I'm a Beam fan, and I didn't think I would be. The story was well-developed and complex, and full of great twists. I loved the worldbuilding and the character work. I listened to the audiobook version, and it is the best audiobook I've heard this year. This is also the first audiobook I've listened to without reading the actual book alongside it. I'm a big fan of Sean and Johnny, but sometimes their books can get dense--not in a bad way, but you have to delve really deep inside because their worlds are insanely detailed. But their style works incredibly well in audio, so well in fact, that this is my new favorite way of consuming their stuff. The story was so much fun--all the technology, the characters, and the way their stories interweave without many of them ever meeting. It's thought-provoking, too, and it really makes you think about the future. I'm really eager to see where it goes. I didn't think I would be a Beam guy, but I ended up liking it a lot. The narration was stellar. I especially loved Rachel Fulginiti as Kai and Ray Chase as Doc. They really brought the characters to life. All of the narrators were good, but some were stronger than others. Writing style-wise, there's a lot to love. It's sumptuous without being too overbearing and imaginative and intriguing. It translates extremely well into audio, too, which is a plus. Don't NOT read this without the audiobook! It's that good.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is simply the most realistic, vivid depiction of a probable future I've ever seen in any science fiction, ever.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Read it and you'll want more!