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The Bears in the Bed and the Great Big Storm
     

The Bears in the Bed and the Great Big Storm

4.5 2
by Paul Bright, Jane Chapman (Illustrator)
 

How the wind blew! How the thunder crashed! How the lightening flashed! Terrified of the wild storm blowing outside, Baby Bear, Little Bear, and Young Bear crawl, one by one, into bed with their parents. "There?s no such thing as monsters," their dad tells each of them. "What a scaredy-bear you are." But when there?s a rat-tat-tat at the door and the lights go out

Overview


How the wind blew! How the thunder crashed! How the lightening flashed! Terrified of the wild storm blowing outside, Baby Bear, Little Bear, and Young Bear crawl, one by one, into bed with their parents. "There?s no such thing as monsters," their dad tells each of them. "What a scaredy-bear you are." But when there?s a rat-tat-tat at the door and the lights go out, Daddy Bear suddenly isn?t quite as brave as he thought… Bestselling illustrator, Jane Chapman, vibrantly captures the joy of snuggling into a warm bed, as well as the strange shadows that can appear in the middle of the night. A wonderful story to read aloud, this is the perfect book for anyone, big or small, who might be afraid of the dark.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
During a wild and stormy night, Bear and Mrs. Bear are awakened by Baby Bear. He is frightened, sure that there is a monster howling outside. Bear assures him that "[t]here's no such thing as monsters," but agrees to let him crawl into their bed. As the thunder crashes outside, Bear remains awake. Little Bear appears, certain that the noise is the rumbling of a monster. Bear repeats the refrain "no such thing," but he lets the child snuggle under the covers. Lightning flashes, keeping Bear awake. Young Bear arrives, complaining about the monster outside. He, too, climbs into the warm soft bed. Bear begins to wonder about the noises and shadows outside. An ever-louder "RAT-TAT-TAT" on the door wakes everyone. Trying to reassure himself now, Bear is at the door…and the wind blows out his candle. In the end, everyone has a laugh. Chapman sets the highly visual story in a warm orange environment in double-page scenes, at first dominated by the adult bears with evidence of children's toys around them. Anthropomorphic gestures and facial expressions by the naturalistically-depicted bears effectively build serio-comic emotional content. Bear, in particular, conveys his growing anxiety, although this is displayed by the entire family on the book's cover. Paint is smoothly applied, reinforcing the underlying comfort of the telling under the rising fears. Appropriate accents are added by increasing the size of a few lines of text and setting them as part of the overall page design. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal

K-Gr 2

While Bear and Mrs. Bear sleep peacefully in their bed on a stormy night, Baby Bear, followed by Little Bear, and then Young Bear, awakens them, each believing that there is a monster outside. Bear admonishes, "There's no such thing as monsters.... What a scaredy-bear you are." However, it is he who continues to lie awake while his family calmly slumbers. When there is a knock at the door, a frightened Bear answers and discovers that the "monster" is a moose looking for shelter. The pages of this charming tale are enhanced by warm colors that resemble firelight. Young children, especially those who fear the strange noises that night often brings, will be comforted by the fact that adults can be frightened, too.-Donna Atmur, Los Angeles Public Library

Kirkus Reviews

It seems that all the little bears in this family are "scaredy-bears" when it comes to thunderstorms. While Bear and Mrs. Bear try to sleep on a stormy night, one by one, Baby Bear, Little Bear and Young Bear creep into their bed, convinced the storm's howls and bangs are monsters. "There's no such thing as monsters!" Bear tries to convince them unsuccessfully. After being awakened three times, it's Bear's turn not to be able to sleep, and he ends up getting spooked by the storm as well. Bear gets a taste of his own medicine when the small bears laugh at him and tell him there's no such thing as monsters. Though not particularly striking in any way, it's still a mildly amusing if predictable story about a classic issue. Human "scaredy-bears" will enjoy the humorous turn and probably find comfort in the repetition and Chapman's trademark cuddly illustrations. (Picture book. 3-6)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781561486366
Publisher:
Skyhorse Publishing
Publication date:
10/31/2008
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
10.40(w) x 11.10(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

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The Bears in the Bed and the Great Big Storm 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Storywraps More than 1 year ago
Can anyone remember laying down in your bed in the middle of the night with the pillow over your head and ears,  trying to block out the ferocious thunderstorm that crashed and flashed across the sky outside your window?  When your tightly closed eyes, your fingers in your ears and the added protection of your pillow just isn't enough,  your thoughts turn to ..... mom and dad's bed for safety and solace from the raging monster outside trying to come in and get you. Bear and Mrs. Bear are having a lovely sleep when into their bed bounces a scared little Baby Bear, terrified out of his mind from the swirling storm outside their cave and totally convinced that monsters are about to attack.  A little while later Little Bear joins the furry huddle claiming he too senses evil monsters lurking outside and trying to invade their cave.  Low and behold, a few minutes later, Young Bear appears and he too crawls into the pile, scared out of his wits too.  Bear says, "You are such a scaredy-bear" to each of his cubs.  "There's no such as monsters." Papa Bear, forever the brave one (or is he?), tries to console his family's fears and in doing so cannot settle himself to get back to sleep.  What happens next is very, very funny indeed and the tables get turned.  Will Bear succumb to the monster fears?  What happens to make him doubt his own advice and become a scaredy-bear himself?  You will have to read the book to find out.  Your imagination and a perfect storm can conjure up all kinds of terrors in your mind.....but never mind....storms do blow over and rainbows appear to assure you that all is well in your world and in this case your cave. I really loved the story and the illustrations were magnificent.
FamilyRocki More than 1 year ago
My 2 1/2 yr old daughter asks for this book night after night! Perfect length and plot line - fantastic illistrations! Every family should have a copy for their library!