The Bell Bandit (The Lemonade War Series #3)

( 65 )

Overview

The third installment of the popular Lemonade War series finds siblings Evan and Jessie Treski at their grandmother's Vermont house for the holidays, solving another mystery. This one involves figuring out who stole a cherished bell the whole neighborhood gathers around to ring in the new year. Evan and Jessie also come to grips with unsettling changes in their grandmother's behavior. Once again, Ms. Davies reveals how good she is at understanding the complex...

See more details below
Paperback
$5.99
BN.com price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (23) from $1.99   
  • New (15) from $2.94   
  • Used (8) from $1.99   
The Bell Bandit (The Lemonade War Series #3)

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$5.49
BN.com price
(Save 8%)$5.99 List Price
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.

Overview

The third installment of the popular Lemonade War series finds siblings Evan and Jessie Treski at their grandmother's Vermont house for the holidays, solving another mystery. This one involves figuring out who stole a cherished bell the whole neighborhood gathers around to ring in the new year. Evan and Jessie also come to grips with unsettling changes in their grandmother's behavior. Once again, Ms. Davies reveals how good she is at understanding the complex emotions of children age nine to twelve years old.      

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Davies' real talent is human relationships." —Betsy Bird, New York Public Library and Fuse#8 blog

"Davies keeps a tight focus on the children: Points of view switch between Evan, with his empathetic and emotional approach to understanding his world, and Jessie, for whom routine is essential and change a puzzle to be worked out. . . . Each of the siblings brings a personal resilience and heroism to the resolution."  —Kirkus

Children's Literature - Beverley Fahey
Jessie and Evan Treski are looking forward to their family's time-honored tradition of Christmas at Grandma's and then ringing in the New Year with the old iron bell on Lowell Hill. This year things are different, however. Grandma's kitchen was gutted in a fire she accidently started and when she comes home from the hospital she seems confused and at times does not recognize Evan. When Jessie treks to the hill to take comfort in the familiarity of the old bell, she discovers that it is missing from the heavy wooden crossbeam. Both Jessie and Evan employ different coping mechanisms: Evan by helping with the repair of the kitchen and trying to understand the changes in his grandmother, and Jessie by trying to solve the mystery of the missing bell. She is aided in her search by new neighbor Maxwell. He, too, is very different with his repetitive gestures and uncanny ability to remember everything he sees and hears. After a frightening encounter with some area bullies Jessie comes to a deeper understanding of Maxwell and a little closer to finding the iconic bell. The night that Grandma goes missing in a blinding snowstorm, Evan and Jessie use their instincts and incredible knowledge of the surrounding area to find her. First introduced in the The Lemonade War, this third novel in the series, centered on the Treski siblings, demands more of an emotional involvement from the reader as Davies explores complex issues like dementia and autism. Chapters alternate between Evan and Jessie as each reacts to, and learns to accept, the changes going on around them. All the plot elements are tightly woven into a heartwarming story told in a captivating, yet simple style. It works as a satisfying stand-alone read and is an excellent choice for a class discussion book. Part of the "Lemonade Wars" series. Reviewer: Beverley Fahey
Kirkus Reviews
When siblings Jessie and Evan (The Lemonade War, 2007, and The Lemonade Crime, 2011) accompany their mother on the time-honored midwinter holiday visit to their grandmother's home in the mountains, the changes are alarming. Fire damage to the house and Grandma's inability to recognize Evan are as disquieting as the disappearance of the iron bell, hung long ago by their grandmother on Lowell Hill and traditionally rung at the New Year. Davies keeps a tight focus on the children: Points of view switch between Evan, with his empathetic and emotional approach to understanding his world, and Jessie, for whom routine is essential and change a puzzle to be worked out. When Grandma ventures out into the snow just before twilight, it is Evan who realizes the danger and manages to find a way to rescue her. Jessie, determined to solve the mystery of the missing bell, enlists the help of Grandma's young neighbor Maxwell, with his unusual habitual gestures and his surprising ability to solve jigsaw puzzles. She is unprepared, however, for the terror of seeing the neighbor boys preparing a mechanical torture device to tear a live frog to pieces. Each of the siblings brings a personal resilience and heroism to the resolution. A fine emotional stretch within reach of the intended audience. (Fiction. 8-11)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780544022744
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
  • Publication date: 5/7/2013
  • Series: Lemonade War Series , #3
  • Pages: 174
  • Sales rank: 35,051
  • Age range: 9 - 12 Years
  • Product dimensions: 5.10 (w) x 7.40 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Jacqueline Davies is the talented writer of several novels and picture books, including The Lemonade War series and The Boy Who Drew Birds. Ms. Davies lives in Needham, Massachusetts, with her family. Visit her website at www.jacquelinedavies.net .

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

Chapter 1

Stuck in the Back

"How much longer?" Jessie asked from the back seat, tapping the window glass three times. Jessie always tapped the window three times when they passed under a bridge.

"Another hour," said Mrs. Treski. She glanced at the clock on the dashboard. "At least."

They had already been driving for three hours, climbing steadily higher and higher into the mountains, and Jessie could feel herself sinking into a sulk. Everything about this trip to Grandma’s house was different.

First of all, Evan was sitting in the front seat.

Jessie could tell he was listening to his iPod. From behind, she could see his head bobbing slightly to the beat of the music as he stared out the window.

Evan had never been allowed to sit up front before. But this time, when he’d asked—for the ten thousandth time—Mrs. Treski had given him a long, thoughtful look and said yes. He was ten and tall for his age, so Mrs. Treski said he was old enough to move up front.

Jessie was nine—and stuck in the back.

"Hey," Jessie said, trying to get Evan to turn around and notice her. But he didn’t. He couldn’t hear her. It was like he wasn’t even in the car with her.

Jessie stared out the window at the farmland as it whizzed by them. Usually, she loved this drive. She loved to count things along the way—cows, hawks, Mini Coopers, out-of-state license plates. She kept tally marks in her notebook, and at the end of the trip, she would count them all up to see who had won. It was almost always the cows.

She also tracked their progress by looking for important landmarks along the way—like the pest control building that had a forty-foot fiberglass cockroach creeping over the roof, or the two-story carved wooden totem pole that was really a cell phone tower, or the billboard for a diner that had a big metal teapot with real steam coming out of it.

Evan used to be on the lookout for these landmarks, too, and it was a race to see who could spot each one first. But this year, he didn’t seem to care. Even when the giant water storage tank painted like a ladybug came into view and Jessie pointed it out to him, he just shrugged, as if he couldn’t be bothered. He was no fun, and suddenly the trip felt long.

They passed under another bridge, and Jessie tapped the window three times. "Why did Grandma set her house on fire?" she asked.

Mrs. Treski’s eyes shifted from the road to the rearview mirror, locking on Jessie’s reflection for a second before returning to the highway. "She didn’t mean to. It was an accident."

"I know," said Jessie. "But why did it happen this time?"

Mrs. Treski tipped her head to one side. "Acci-dents happen. Sometimes there’s no reason. She left something on the stove, and it caught on fire. It could happen to anyone."

But it hadn’t happened to her grandma before. Jessie thought about all the times Grandma had cooked noodles for her or made hot chocolate for her or heated up soup for her. Not once had she set the house on fire.

It was because of the fire that they were driving up to Grandma’s two days after Christmas instead of the day before, the way they always did. And it was because of the fire that they weren’t even sure if they would be staying at Grandma’s for New Year’s Eve the way they did every year. And that was the really big thing that was different this time.

For as long as Jessie could remember, New Year’s Eve meant staying at Grandma’s house and the long, slow climb to the top of Lovell’s Hill, where the trees parted and the sky opened and there stood the old iron bell hanging on its heavy wooden crossbeam.

Just before midnight they would gather, walking through the snow-covered woods, coming from all sides of the hill—neighbors and friends, family and sometimes even strangers—to sing the old songs and talk about the year gone by.

And then, just before midnight, the youngest one in the crowd and the oldest one, too, would step forward and both take hold of the rope that hung from the clapper of the dark and heavy bell, and at precisely the right moment, they would ring in the New Year, as loudly and joyously and for as long as they wanted.

Jessie remembered the year when she had been the youngest one on the hill, and what it felt like when Mrs. Lewis, who was eighty-four that year, had closed her soft, papery hand over hers. They had swung the rope back and forth, over and over, until the noise of the bell filled the snow-covered valley below and the echoes of each peal bounced off of Black Bear Mountain and came racing back to them, like an old faithful dog that always comes home.

But this year, everything was upside down. They might not even spend New Year’s Eve at Grandma’s house. It all depended Mrs. Treski said. On what? Jessie wondered. She tapped her right knee twice. Not spend New Year’s Eve at Grandma’s? Who would ring the bell?

Jessie jiggled her legs up and down. Her left foot was feeling prickly because she’d had it tucked up under her for the last half-hour. "How much longer to the Crossroads Store?" she asked.

"Oh, Jessie . . ." said her mother, looking in the rearview mirror again. "Do you need to stop?"

"What do you mean?" asked Jessie. It wasn’t a question of whether she needed to—although now that she thought of it, a trip to the bathroom sounded like a good idea. "We always stop at the Crossroads Store," she said, with a hint of a whine in her voice.

"It’s just that I thought this time we could drive straight through," said Mrs. Treski. "We’re making such good time, and you know how the weather is in the mountains. You never know what might blow in."

" Mo-o-om," said Jessie. Everything was messed up on this trip. "Evan, you want to stop at the Crossroads, don’t you?"

Evan just kept looking out the window, nodding his head in time to the music on his iPod.

"Evan!" Jessie didn’t mean to hit him quite so hard on the shoulder.

"Quit it!" he said, turning around to glare at her.

"I’m asking you a question!" she shouted. Evan took out one of the ear buds and let it dangle from his ear like a dead worm on a hook. "Do you want to stop at the Crossroads?" Jessie couldn’t help thinking the question sounded dumb. Of course he would want to stop.

But Evan just shrugged and put the ear bud back in his ear. "I don’t care."

Jessie threw herself against the seat and folded her arms over her chest.

"Relax, Jessie," said Mrs. Treski. "We’ll stop. I could use a break to stretch my legs, anyway. But we can’t stay too long. I don’t want to get to Grandma’s after dark."

***

The Crossroads Store was a ten-minute detour off the main highway. It was on the corner of two roads that were so dinky, Mrs. Treski called it the intersection of Nowhere and Oblivion. But the store itself was miraculous. It was a combination gas station, deli, bakery, gift shop, bookshop, hunting/fishing/clothing store, and post office. They sold kayaks, guns, taxidermied animals, hunting knives, Get Well cards, umbrellas, joke books, night crawlers, candy, and decorative wall calendars. Jessie could wander the store for hours, wishing she had the money to buy just about everything.

She only had five dollars in her pocket, though. That was all the money she’d allowed herself to bring on this trip. Back home in her lock box, she had almost thirty dollars. Most of that was from the money she’d made during the lemonade war, or at least what was left over after she made that $104 contribution to the Animal Rescue League. ("You don’t have to give as much as I did," Megan had said, but Jessie had insisted. "I said I was going to, and I’m going to," she said, even though it almost killed her to give all that money away—and to animals!)

But no matter how enticing everything in the Crossroads Store looked to her (a squirrel nutcracker! fake mustaches!), Jessie wasn’t about to spend thirty dollars. She liked to have money saved. Just in case.

After using the bathroom, she walked over to where Evan was standing, halfway between the deli and the bakery. He was looking at fancy gift bags of candy, all done up with curlicue ribbons.

"Look!" he said, holding up a bag. It was a bag of chocolate-covered blueberries, named Moose Droppings. "Want some?" he asked, dangling the bag in front of her face.

"That is so gross!" Jessie said. But she loved it. The candy really did look exactly like moose droppings, only smaller. On closer inspection, she saw that there were also chocolate-covered cranberries and chocolate-covered raisins. "Are you going to get a bag? We could split one. Which one do you think is the best?" But Evan had wandered off and wasn’t listening to her anymore.

Jessie put the bag back on the shelf and walked over to the corner of the store devoted to jigsaw puzzles. There were a dozen puzzles to choose from, but Jessie’s eyes went immediately to the one that was a picture of jellybeans. The brightly colored candies looked like rocks on a pebbly beach, and Jessie knew the puzzle would be hard to do. It had a thousand pieces!

"Jessie, are you ready?" asked her mother, shoving a few dollars back into her wallet after paying for the gas.

"Can we get this? Please?" asked Jessie, pulling the jellybean puzzle down from the shelf. "For Grandma?" Jessie and Grandma always worked on jigsaw puzzles when the family visited, and Jessie often brought a new puzzle for them to try. They had never done a thousand-piece puzzle, though.

Jessie’s mom paused, the money still hanging out from her wallet. Jessie knew her mom had to be careful with money, and she tried hard not to ask for things she didn’t need. "I have five dollars," said Jessie. "I could chip in."

Mrs. Treski took the puzzle and said, "It’s a good idea, Jess. You and Grandma can work on it when she gets home from the hospital."

Jessie smiled, glad she could have the puzzle without spending her own money, and turned to the circular spinning postcard rack that was next to the jigsaw puzzles. There were eight columns of cards, and Jessie liked to make the rack squeak as she turned it slowly. She started at the top and began to work her way straight down one column, and then went back up to the top of the next column. She didn’t want to miss a single card.

"Jess, can we go now?" asked her mother, looking through the various compartments of her wallet as if money would magically appear if she looked hard enough.

"No, I’m looking at the cards," said Jessie.

"You must own every card on that rack."

"Sometimes they have a new one," said Jessie.

"Five minutes, okay? Five minutes, I want to be pulling out of the parking lot." Mrs. Treski walked off to the checkout counter to pay for the puzzle.

Why was her mom so impatient? Usually she loved to stop at the Crossroads, but this time it was all about making good time and getting back on the road. Well, Jessie wasn’t going to be rushed. She finished looking at the second column of postcards, and then started on the third.

"Ever been there?"

Jessie looked up. An old man with a stubbly beard was squinting through his glasses at a postcard that showed the Olympic Stadium in Lake Placid. Jessie noticed that the glasses sat crooked on his face. "The stadium where they had the Olympics? Ever been there?"

Jessie shook her head. "No."

The man tapped the card. "I was there in 1980 and 1932. Yes, I was. I saw Sonja Henie win the gold medal for figure skating. Do you believe that?" He nodded his head up and down as if he could make her do the same.

Wow, 1932! How could anyone be that old? Jessie looked closely at the man standing beside her. He started to scratch his face like he had a bad rash. "Were you in the Olympics?" she asked.

"No!" said the man, "but I had dreams." He was nodding his head more vigorously now—nodding and scratching—and his eyes were locked on the far end of the store.

"Hey, Jess, come on," said Evan, grabbing hold of one elbow and pulling her toward the door.

"I’m not done!" she said. But Evan didn’t let go of her until they were outside. When Jessie looked back through the window, she saw that the man was still scratching his face and talking, even though no one was near.

"That guy was crazy," Evan said, matter-of-factly.

"How do you know?" asked Jessie, looking up at her big brother.

Evan shrugged and put his headphones back on. "You can just tell."

But Jessie couldn’t tell. It hadn’t occurred to her that there was anything wrong with the old man. Why did old people get like that? Did something break down inside their heads, the way a shoelace eventually snaps after being tied too many times? And how exactly did Evan know?

As soon as they got back on the highway, it started to snow. At first the flakes were large and wet, sticking for an instant to the windshield like giant white moths before dissolving into quarter size drops of water. Then the snow became steadier and more fierce, and the ground on either side of the highway turned white and shapeless. It was dusk when they pulled up to the end of Grandma’s long, winding driveway and got their first look at the house.

"Oh my," said Mrs. Treski, turning off the ignition and letting the car lights die.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 65 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(40)

4 Star

(9)

3 Star

(8)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(6)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 65 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 2, 2012

    Best book

    Love the book so buy it

    13 out of 22 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 21, 2012

    Best

    This series is the best in the world!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!"""""

    10 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 11, 2012

    The Bell Bandit

    I had some Nook priblems while reading the book but the story was awesome besides when it would repeat pages. But I give the story 5 stars

    9 out of 15 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted November 27, 2012

    very good

    My granddaughter and I read this book over the Thanksgiving holiday. We both enjoyed it. We read the first 2 books last year and are continueing with this series. The morals and teachings in the books are great!

    8 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 22, 2013

    A

    I think it is a great book i am 10 years old and i read this book and i loved it so much i made my mom read it and guess what she loves this book she says it is one of the best books she has ever read.

    6 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 17, 2013

    Best book

    It has alot of detail. I love it. It has a nice plot and every thing flows togather

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 29, 2012

    Lemonade war

    The lemonade war is a great book ;)

    4 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 10, 2012

    Nicholas Carnevale

    Great!!!

    4 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 21, 2012

    The bell bandit

    This book is really awesome i couldnt have written it better my self

    4 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 11, 2012

    Ok

    Good

    3 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 16, 2012

    Listen

    We all want the game temple run!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Nook people therer is loke 5000 people that wrote pn 2 games that the want it and so do i yall have been great and all but temple run would make yall have a lot of money so listen to this

    2 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 23, 2012

    Cool

    Nice book

    2 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 15, 2012

    Glassws

    2 out of 24 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 31, 2013

    It's really good.

    It's a good mystery. If you like The Lemonade War and The Lemonade Crime, you'll like this too. I don't really like reading, but I like these books.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 17, 2013

    Ehhhhhhh

    It was okay to me. The first and second book were definetly better!!!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 15, 2013

    Bell bandit

    I enjoy reading the lemonads series i enjoy the bell bandit the most

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 26, 2013

    Bell bandit

    Great book!!!!!! I love it, and highly reccomend it!!!!!!

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 2, 2013

    Good

    Just read it is great

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 5, 2012

    Storyguy

    I think this one is proble the worst in the series iwould think 1out of 10 i give it a 5 and for me first book 2 stars second book 3 stars

    1 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 24, 2012

    Bold w/ words

    Is this a book club rite?

    1 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 65 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)