BN.com Gift Guide

The Best American Recipes 2004-2005: The Year's Top Picks from Books, Magazines, Newspapers, and the Internet

Overview


You love to cook, and you're always looking for great new recipes. But who on earth has time to search out the very best recipes among the thousands in the latest food magazines, new cookbooks, food-related Web sites, and local and national newspapers? Now two seasoned professionals have done all the work for you.
Acclaimed by reviewers from the New York Times to People as the only collection of its kind, The Best American Recipes offers a dazzlingly diverse selection. To ...
See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (40) from $1.99   
  • New (3) from $12.00   
  • Used (37) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing 1 – 2 of 3
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$12.00
Seller since 2010

Feedback rating:

(60)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
Boston, MA 2004 Hard cover 2004-2005 ed. New. BRIGHT SHINY, BRAND NEW Glued binding. Paper over boards. With dust jacket. 305 p. 150 Best Recipes. Audience: General/trade.

Ships from: Sloansville, NY

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$50.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(194)

Condition: New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing 1 – 2 of 3
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview


You love to cook, and you're always looking for great new recipes. But who on earth has time to search out the very best recipes among the thousands in the latest food magazines, new cookbooks, food-related Web sites, and local and national newspapers? Now two seasoned professionals have done all the work for you.
Acclaimed by reviewers from the New York Times to People as the only collection of its kind, The Best American Recipes offers a dazzlingly diverse selection. To create this year's edition -- the most exciting ever -- Fran McCullough and Molly Stevens combed through hundreds of sources, from the most talked about to the most obscure, tracking down thousands of recipes. They thoroughly home-tested each dish so you can be sure that every one is foolproof.
Variety is the key. You'll find inspiration for every meal and every occasion, with rediscovered classics as well as brilliantly simple dishes from the nation's top chefs. The more than 150 recipes include

• a terrific starter you can make in minutes: Minted Pea Soup, from the British cooking sensation Jamie Oliver • an elegant breakfast: Baked Eggs in Maple Toast Cups, from a small Vermont food company • a quick weeknight supper: Chicken Saltimbocca, from a supermarket flyer • a fresh and versatile vegetarian main dish that's great for a party: Cremini Mushrooms with Chive Pasta, from a celebrated New York chef • a truly memorable holiday side dish: Mashed Potatoes with Sage and White Cheddar Cheese, from a major food magazine • the perfect snack: Chunky Peanut Butter and Oatmeal Chocolate Chipsters, from a soon-to-be-published cookbook by a baking expert

Every recipe comes with tips and suggestions from the editors' home kitchens, which expand your cooking and serving options and give you sterling results the first time, every time.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

150 recipes that scream, "Try Me!" The San Diego Union-Tribune
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780618455065
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
  • Publication date: 10/14/2004
  • Series: Best American Recipes Series
  • Edition description: 2004-2005 Edition
  • Pages: 320
  • Product dimensions: 7.13 (w) x 10.25 (h) x 0.81 (d)

Meet the Author

Bobby Flay

Fran McCullough has been an editor at Harper and Row, Dial Press, and Bantam, where she discovered such major cookbook authors as Deborah Madison, Diana Kennedy, Paula Wolfert, Martha Rose Shulman, and Colman Andrews. She is a coauthor of Great Food Without Fuss, which won a James Beard Award, and the author of the best-selling Low-Carb Cookbook, The Good Fat Cookbook, and Living Low-Carb.
Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt


In t r o d u c t i o n

We never quite know what we’re going to find when we begin combing through hundreds of cookbooks, magazines, and newspapers looking for the best recipes of the year — which is a good part of why this is such an exciting enterprise. It’s not unlike a massive culinary treasure hunt. Sometimes the treasures are anything but obvious, such as the Manhattan chef Waldy Malouf’s pasta with mushrooms and chives — a recipe that looks so plain-Jane on paper that we almost passed it by. Yet as soon as we tested this easy recipe, we immediately fell for its clean but complex flavors. It’s one of those can’t-stop-eating- it dishes that we make again and again — a definite “best.”

One of the most intriguing aspects of our search is recognizing the hot dishes of the year that seem to pop up everywhere. Once we identify these, we take it upon ourselves to test our way through as many versions as it takes to find the very best one out there. For instance, we knew early on that good old-fashioned crispy fried chicken was a big passion this year, partly because the food writer Jeffrey Steingarten fried his way through some two hundred chickens and devoted an entire column in Vogue to his findings. After testing plenty of different recipes, the one that stole our hearts was Fried Chicken Littles— crunchy, tender morsels served with a zingy, eye-opening dipping sauce.

It also didn’t take us long to notice that granita, the sparkling Italian ice that up until now seems to have been waiting in the wings, was suddenly everywhere and in every imaginable flavor. This super-simple frozen dessert easily displaced sorbet and even ice cream this year. Taste the grapefruit and star anise granita in the dessert chapter, and you’ll know why.

These are, of course, very homey dishes.
And without a doubt, “homey” is the watchword this year. But that doesn’t mean plain, and it certainly doesn’t mean boring. From shrimp cocktail and chicken noodle soup, to burgers and meatballs, to crisps and crumbles, the recipes that delight us may be familiar, but each has a sophisticated global twist.
Shrimp cocktail comes glazed with a spicy-sweet jalapeno-lime sauce, green chiles show up in macaroni and cheese, burgers are made from fresh salmon and dolloped with a snappy adoli, and old-fashioned chiffon layer cake is flavored with ginger and mango.

We also were struck by a corresponding and equally unmistakable trend: the revival of old recipes that had been forgotten or had fallen out of favor. We freely admit to having a huge preservationist streak, and we were thrilled to find others sharing the same passion.
Resurrecting old recipes is not just an exercise in historic preservation; some are just too good to do without, including the mild southern curry called Country Captain.
We tested several and chose a particularly elegant version.

You probably won’t find a trifle on your favorite restaurant menu, but this big holiday treat from England has been gathering a lot of interest on this side of the ocean. The one we love most is Nigella Lawson’s summer blackberry trifle, which brilliantly simplifies this gorgeous, impressive dessert.

Not that every standout recipe of the year falls into the old-fashioned, homey category.
There are plenty of thrilling new recipes as well, such as Paula Wolfert’s ethereal asparagus, cooked slowly in its own delectable juices with a touch of fresh tarragon.

A quick scan through the recipes that made their way into this collection reveals an impressive facility with global flavors that is no longer limited to chefs or hard-core foodies.
We were happily surprised to see how mainstream several cuisines have become: Spanish and Mexican, in particular, but also West Indian (one reason ginger beer is turning up everywhere). Possibly the most exotic cuisine we encountered is Scandinavian, which brings its own refined excitement to our tables. These influences are changing the contents of our pantries, where you’re now likely to encounter pimentón (Spanish smoked paprika), chipotles (smoked jalapenos) in adobo sauce, chorizo, pancetta (the unsmoked bacon of Italy), and panko (wonderfully crisp Japanese bread crumbs). Tomatillos, exotic mushrooms, and an assortment of fresh and dried chiles have entered the everyday realm and are now available in supermarkets almost everywhere.
Americans have been slow to recognize the charms of pecorino Romano, the earthier cousin of Parmigiano-Reggiano. But this year we’re making up for lost time — pecorino turns up everywhere.

At the same time, once-unfamiliar techniques are becoming commonplace. For instance, five yearss ago only the most dedicated cooks would undertake grinding their own spices to season a dish. Today a mortar and pestle or a little electric spice grinder (or a coffee grinder) is standard equipment in any well-appointed kitchennnnn. The flavor dividends for the moments it takes to grind your own are simply amazing.

Even after compiling this book for six years in a row, we are seduced (a lot more often than we should be) by recipes that look good on the page but simply don’t deliver in the kitchen. The proof really is in the pudding.
We can assure you that all of the recipes in this collection have not only been kitchen-tested but meet our standards for dishes we want to make again and again. For those recipes that made the cut, we’ve added our own notes from the testing, to give you an idea of what to expect and offer suggestions about how you can play with them. And once again we present our favorite ten recipes from the book, so you won’t miss them.

— Fr a n Mc C u l l o u g h and M o l ly St e v e n s

Copyright © 2004 by Houghton Mifflin. Introduction copyright © 2004 by Fran McCullough and Molly Stevens. Reprinted by permission of Houghton Mifflin Company.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents


Contents

Foreword vi Introduction ix The Top Ten Recipes xi Starters 1 Soups 29 Salads 52 Breakfast and Brunch 80 Main Dishes 98 Side Dishes 156 Breads 196 Desserts 212 Drinks 277 Credits 288 Index 295

Read More Show Less

First Chapter

Introduction

We never quite know what we're
going to find when we begin combing
through hundreds of cookbooks, magazines,
and newspapers looking for the best recipes
of the year — which is a good part of why this
is such an exciting enterprise. It's not unlike a
massive culinary treasure hunt. Sometimes
the treasures are anything but obvious, such
as the Manhattan chef Waldy Malouf's pasta
with mushrooms and chives — a recipe that
looks so plain-Jane on paper that we almost
passed it by. Yet as soon as we tested this easy
recipe, we immediately fell for its clean but
complex flavors. It's one of those can't-stop-eating-
it dishes that we make again and again
— a definite 'best.'

One of the most intriguing aspects of
our search is recognizing the hot dishes of the
year that seem to pop up everywhere. Once we
identify these, we take it upon ourselves to
test our way through as many versions as it
takes to find the very best one out there. For
instance, we knew early on that good old-fashioned
crispy fried chicken was a big passion
this year, partly because the food writer Jeffrey
Steingarten fried his way through some two
hundred chickens and devoted an entire column
in Vogue to his findings. After testing
plenty of different recipes, the one that stole
our hearts was Fried Chicken Littles—
crunchy, tender morsels served with a zingy,
eye-opening dipping sauce.

It also didn't take us long to notice that
granita, the sparkling Italian ice that up until
now seems to have been waiting in the wings,
was suddenly everywhere and in everyimaginable
flavor. This super-simple frozen dessert easily displaced sorbet and even ice
cream this year. Taste the grapefruit and star
anise granita in the dessert chapter, and you'll
know why.

These are, of course, very homey dishes.
And without a doubt, 'homey' is the watchword
this year. But that doesn't mean plain,
and it certainly doesn't mean boring. From
shrimp cocktail and chicken noodle soup, to
burgers and meatballs, to crisps and crumbles,
the recipes that delight us may be familiar,
but each has a sophisticated global twist.
Shrimp cocktail comes glazed with a spicy-sweet
jalapeño-lime sauce, green chiles show
up in macaroni and cheese, burgers are made
from fresh salmon and dolloped with a
snappy aïoli, and old-fashioned chiffon layer
cake is flavored with ginger and mango.

We also were struck by a corresponding
and equally unmistakable trend: the revival of
old recipes that had been forgotten or had
fallen out of favor. We freely admit to having a
huge preservationist streak, and we were
thrilled to find others sharing the same passion.
Resurrecting old recipes is not just an
exercise in historic preservation; some are
just too good to do without, including the
mild southern curry called Country Captain.
We tested several and chose a particularly elegant
version.

You probably won't find a trifle on your
favorite restaurant menu, but this big holiday
treat from England has been gathering a lot of
interest on this side of the ocean. The one we
love most is Nigella Lawson's summer blackberry
trifle, which brilliantly simplifies this
gorgeous, impressive dessert.

Not that every standout recipe of the year
falls into the old-fashioned, homey category.
There are plenty of thrilling new recipes as
well, such as Paula Wolfert's ethereal asparagus,
cooked slowly in its own delectable juices
with a touch of fresh tarragon.

A quick scan through the recipes that
made their way into this collection reveals an
impressive facility with global flavors that is
no longer limited to chefs or hard-core foodies.
We were happily surprised to see how
mainstream several cuisines have become:
Spanish and Mexican, in particular, but also
West Indian (one reason ginger beer is turning
up everywhere). Possibly the most exotic
cuisine we encountered is Scandinavian,
which brings its own refined excitement to our
tables. These influences are changing the contents
of our pantries, where you're now likely
to encounter pimentón (Spanish smoked paprika),
chipotles (smoked jalapeños) in adobo
sauce, chorizo, pancetta (the unsmoked bacon
of Italy), and panko (wonderfully crisp Japanese
bread crumbs). Tomatillos, exotic mushrooms,
and an assortment of fresh and dried
chiles have entered the everyday realm and are
now available in supermarkets almost everywhere.
Americans have been slow to recognize
the charms of pecorino Romano, the
earthier cousin of Parmigiano-Reggiano. But
this year we're making up for lost time —
pecorino turns up everywhere.

At the same time, once-unfamiliar techniques
are becoming commonplace. For instance,
five years ago only the most dedicated
cooks would undertake grinding their own
spices to season a dish. Today a mortar and
pestle or a little electric spice grinder (or a coffee
grinder) is standard equipment in any
well-appointed kitchen. The flavor dividends
for the moments it takes to grind your own
are simply amazing.

Even after compiling this book for six
years in a row, we are seduced (a lot more often
than we should be) by recipes that look
good on the page but simply don't deliver in
the kitchen. The proof really is in the pudding.
We can assure you that all of the recipes
in this collection have not only been kitchen-tested
but meet our standards for dishes we
want to make again and again. For those
recipes that made the cut, we've added our
own notes from the testing, to give you an
idea of what to expect and offer suggestions
about how you can play with them. And once
again we present our favorite ten recipes from
the book, so you won't miss them.

— Fran McCullough
and Molly Stevens
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)