The Best American Sports Writing 1997

The Best American Sports Writing 1997

by George Plimpton
     
 
Well established as the premier sports anthology, The Best American Sports Writing brings together the finest writing on sports to appear in the past year. Chosen from more than 350 national, regional, and specialty publications, the 25 pieces embrace the world of sports in all its drama, humanity, and excitement.

Overview

Well established as the premier sports anthology, The Best American Sports Writing brings together the finest writing on sports to appear in the past year. Chosen from more than 350 national, regional, and specialty publications, the 25 pieces embrace the world of sports in all its drama, humanity, and excitement.

Editorial Reviews

Kirkus Reviews
The editor of Paris Review and sporting dilettante extraordinaire Plimpton separates the sportswriting champs from the chumps in the latest entry in this annual series.

In his foreword, series editor Stout notes that throughout recent history "sports and literature were not strangers." The inclusion of such noted "men of letters" as Gay Talese, David Halberstam, and the preternaturally long-winded David Foster Wallace—whose Esquire essay, "The String Theory," clocks in at 34 pages—certainly does little to disprove this observation. Curiously, only one "woman of letters" was judged to merit inclusion among the 21 entries: Miami Herald writer Linda Robertson's excellent "Platform Pitfalls," which dramatically, and sickeningly, describes the toll high diving exacts on young athletes. Further proof that sports is still a man's world is a disappointing piece by Pulitzer Prize winner Richard Ford, "Hunting with My Wife," in which he patronizes his better half—and his readers—with asides about the poor fashion sense of his spouse, a former fashion model, and her lack of a killer's instinct. There are other nits to pick: Surely there must have been some better writing over the past year than Roger Angell's gushy profile of pitching star David Cone. All this is not to imply that there aren't some outstanding articles here. John Krakauer's "Into Thin Air," the Outside piece that became the basis for his bestselling book; Tom Boswell's "Controlling Force," a brilliant profile of one of the greatest pitchers of our (or any) time, Greg Maddux; and Garry Smith's prescient and incisive Sports Illustrated article about golfer Tiger Woods—all prove that the sporting press includes some of the canniest writers to be found anywhere. Still, if much this collection represents the best stuff available, one hesitates to see the articles that didn't pass muster.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780395797624
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
11/03/1997
Series:
Best American Sports Writing Series
Edition description:
Older Edition
Pages:
348
Product dimensions:
5.53(w) x 8.28(h) x 0.90(d)

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Founder of The Paris Review and a frequent contributer to Sports Illustraited, George Plimpton has written fourteen books. He currently lives in New York City.

Glenn Stout has been the series editor of The Best American Sports Writing since its inception and has written three illustrated biographies with Richard A. Johnson: Ted Williams: A Portrait in Words and Pictures, Joe DiMaggio: An Illustrated Life, and Jackie Robinson: Between the Baselines. He is a columnist for Boston Baseball, and the acclaimed author of Red Sox Century, Yankees Century, and The Dodgers. His work has appeared in many regional and national magazines and newspapers.

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
March 18, 1927
Date of Death:
September 25, 2003
Place of Birth:
New York, NY
Place of Death:
New York, NY
Education:
B.A. in English Literature, Harvard University, 1950; Master's degree, Cambridge University, 1952

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >