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Best of Faces: Good Boys...When They're Asleep...
     

The Best of Faces: Good Boys...When They're Asleep...

by Faces
 

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Toiling in the shadow of such British rock aristocracy as the Rolling Stones and the Who, the Faces made a righteously rude racket during the early 1970s. The earlier version of the band, the Small Faces, was known in America (if at all) for the psychedelic single "Itchycoo Park." When Steve Marriott left to form

Overview

Toiling in the shadow of such British rock aristocracy as the Rolling Stones and the Who, the Faces made a righteously rude racket during the early 1970s. The earlier version of the band, the Small Faces, was known in America (if at all) for the psychedelic single "Itchycoo Park." When Steve Marriott left to form Humble Pie, the others enlisted the whiskey-soaked vocals and grungy guitar work of Rod Stewart and Ron Wood, fresh from the original Jeff Beck Group. Stewart became a solo star during his years with the (no longer Small) Faces, and while he kept his very best songs for his own records, he also clearly enjoyed fronting this particular rock 'n' roll band. And a stellar unit it was, with Kenny Jones bashing away on the drums, Ronnie Lane on bass and vocals, Ian McLagan wailing on the Hammond organ, and Wood perfecting the slide lead and gnarly rhythm style that would land him his gig with the Stones. Stewart shines on the bawdy "Stay with Me," the folkish "Sweet Lady Mary," and a top-notch Dylan cover, "Wicked Messenger," and he and the band swagger -- rough-edged and boozy -- through macho rockers ("Miss Judy's Farm," "Too Bad"), dance-hall shuffles ("You're So Rude"), and introspective bluesy numbers ("Flying"). Like those songs, the loose-limbed, lighthearted Faces found the fun in rock 'n' roll, and used it to create a joyful, and infectious, sound.

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Stephen Thomas Erlewine
Twenty years after their breakup, the Faces remained one of the most beloved bands in rock history, but it wasn't until 1999 that they were rewarded with a genuine collection, one that worked as an introduction while satisfying the dedicated with a truly listenable, terrific album. Not that the 19-track Good Boys When They're Asleep: Best of Faces contains everything worthwhile from the band -- the absence of the extraordinary live version of Paul McCartney's "Maybe I'm Amazed" is the most egregious omission, and there are a number of remarkable songs missing as well -- but it's hard to quibble with anything that is here. As a matter of fact, listening to Good Boys When They're Asleep is quite a thrilling ride, since it emphasizes their two sides -- the rowdy, party-addled rockers and the melancholy ballads. Collectors will be happy to have the previously unreleased "Open to Ideas," along with the non-LP selections "Pool Hall Richard" and "You Can Make Me Dance, Sing or Anything," but the real news about the disc is that it offers a genuine retrospective that's every bit as good as the band itself, while arguably being a better, more cohesive record than any of the original albums. For longtime fans, as well as neophytes who have read about the Faces but never dived into the records, it's an album that's worth the wait.

Product Details

Release Date:
08/17/1999
Label:
Rhino
UPC:
0081227583026
catalogNumber:
75830
Rank:
53899

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Faces   Primary Artist
Rod Stewart   Vocals
Ronnie Wood   Bass,Guitar,Harmonica,Vocals,Background Vocals
Ian McLagan   Piano,Harmonium,Hammond Organ,Clavinet
Ronnie Lane   Bass,Guitar,Tambourine,Vocals,Background Vocals
Tetsu Yamauchi   Bass
Kenney Jones   Percussion,Drums

Technical Credits

Faces   Producer
Small Faces   Producer
Ian McLagan   Remixing
Greg Allen   Art Direction
Hugh Brown   Art Direction
Glyn Johns   Producer
Bill Inglot   Producer
Ron Nevison   Engineer
Andy Taub   Engineer
Dave Marsh   Liner Notes
Elizabeth Pavone   Editorial Coordinator
Daniel Goldmark   Editorial Research

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