The Best Place To Read

The Best Place To Read

by Susan Bloom, Michael Garland
     
 

A young child tries to find the perfect place to curl up with his new book in this hilarious and heartwarming tale. Scampering from his bedroom to the den, from the kitchen to the backyard, the young protagonist must dodge his baby sister’s messes, race across a lawn full of spraying sprinklers, and more–all in his search for the best place to read! And… See more details below

  • Checkmark Kids' Club Eligible  Shop Now

Overview

A young child tries to find the perfect place to curl up with his new book in this hilarious and heartwarming tale. Scampering from his bedroom to the den, from the kitchen to the backyard, the young protagonist must dodge his baby sister’s messes, race across a lawn full of spraying sprinklers, and more–all in his search for the best place to read! And where would that be? Mommy’s lap, of course!

From the Hardcover Library Binding edition.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publishers Weekly
Eager to read his new book, the narrator of Bertram and Bloom's frolicsome debut just can't find the right spot to read. "I love Grammy's soft, cozy chair./ But so does old Rover. I tell him, `Move over,'/ But he won't make room for me there." The bean bag chair springs a leak, the backyard sprinklers drench him, and a wayward spring in "a lumpy and bumpy old chair" shoots him up "so high in the air." Finally he finds "the best place to be, just my book, Mom, and me"-his mother's lap. Except for a handful of awkward verses, the bouncy rhymes accentuate the slapstick and capture the boy's eagerness, frustration and (at last) cozy bliss. Garland (The Mouse Before Christmas) follows the text's light-hearted lead with computer-generated illustrations that recall Toy Story in the sculpted-clay look of figures and objects. The narrator's melon-size head sits atop a diminutive body, and his geometric world sports perfectly round bushes, with vibrant backgrounds featuring strong patterns. But the stylized approach diminishes the tender conclusion: in his mother's lap the boy appears stiff and his expression seems almost vacant. Aside from the chilly visual wrap-up, however, the story should elicit some giggles. Ages 3-6. (Jan.) Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Children's Literature
Follow along as a little boy receives a new book. He is very excited and can't wait to read his new book. He tries to sit in his favorite chair, however discovers that it is too small for him. Next he tries to sit where he sees all of his family members sit and read and no seat works well for him. At the end of his search, he quickly realizes that the perfect place to be reading a book is in his mommy's lap with her reading the story to him. The text is simple and easy to understand with a vague sense of rhyming while he is seeking and trying to find, yet it is a cute story that gives a gentle reminder to adults and children. The illustrations are bright, vivid and life-like and will help children relate. This picture book gives an important message that one of the best gifts a parent or an adult can give to a child is taking the time to sit and read a book. Daily reading can help make a difference in his or her future. The story also emphasizes that it is okay to ask to have a book and/or story read to you. 2003, Random House Children's Books,
— Christy Oestreich
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2-A young boy describes his dilemma: he has a new book, but can't seem to find a comfortable and quiet place to read it. Like Goldilocks, he finds various seats too small, too chilly, too wobbly, or already occupied. The singsong verses describe how he rejects one spot after another as a spring in the old armchair comes loose under him, a lawn sprinkler turns on next to him, and his brother's beanbag chair explodes beneath him. The lighthearted artwork has the flat look of computer graphics, and some of the images seem slightly out of focus. Despite a satisfactory ending (the boy and his mother read together in a cozy chair), the overall effect is wearing, as the slight, single-minded plot barely manages to sustain interest. Still, young readers will enjoy exploring the colorful details that fill this child's world. A mixed effort that's mildly appealing.-Kathie Meizner, Montgomery County Public Libraries, Chevy Chase, MD Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
If a good man is hard to find, that�s nothing compared to a good reading chair, as Bertram and Bloom�s youthful protagonist discovers when he goes looking for the right place to read his new book. Using an ear-pleasing rhyme scheme, readers follow the boy from chair to chair as each presents a problem: "A new book for me� / I can�t wait to read! / I run to my own little chair. / I�m growing too tall and the seat is too small, / So I am not comfortable there." As seen through the illustrations, a slick fusion of soft and razor-edged computer images that sport electric coloring and quirky shading, the boy travels through his house, finding each chair encumbered by animals, noise, burst seams, sprinkler systems, disruptive siblings, and wayward springs. But he is a dogged soul, pushing on until he comes to an undeniably fine spot for a youngster to curl up with a book: "The best place to be, just my book, Mom, and me�" It�s a sweet ending, one that avoids being mawkish because it has been so hard-won. (Picture book. 3-6)

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780375822933
Publisher:
Random House Children's Books
Publication date:
01/28/2003
Edition description:
1ST
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
9.30(w) x 9.30(h) x 0.32(d)
Age Range:
3 - 6 Years

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >