Best Pressure Cooker Recipes

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Imagine being able to prepare a wonderful beef stoganoff in only 10 minutes. Or a rich, creamy cheesecake in only 20 minutes. That's a complete meal in just half an hour! And it's what you'll be able to enjoy with your pressure cooker and The Best Pressure Cooker Recipes.

While the benefits of pressure cooking have been known for generations, advances in pressure cooker design have made these small appliances safer and more convenient than ever before. Today, North Americans are...

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Overview

Imagine being able to prepare a wonderful beef stoganoff in only 10 minutes. Or a rich, creamy cheesecake in only 20 minutes. That's a complete meal in just half an hour! And it's what you'll be able to enjoy with your pressure cooker and The Best Pressure Cooker Recipes.

While the benefits of pressure cooking have been known for generations, advances in pressure cooker design have made these small appliances safer and more convenient than ever before. Today, North Americans are discovering that pressure cooked meals are not only faster (about 75% faster, on average) but also healthier since the food retains more of its nutrient value while requiring less fat for cooking. The result is that over the past decade, pressure cooker sales have continued to rise, now approaching 1 million units a year.

While the resurgence of pressure cooking is comparatively new to North American households, in other countries
(from France to India) it has always been the preferred method for preparing moist and flavorful stews, vegetables, risottos, and soups. In fact, many homes in Europe and Asia will use two cookers simultaneously to prepare a meal.

With The Best Pressure Cooker Recipes you get more than 125 recipes specifically designed to take advantage of what pressure cookers do best. And as you'll discover, pressure cookers are amazingly versatile. Sample from starters such as "Braised Artichokes with Red Pepper Aïoli" or "Spicy Sweet Potato Soup." Delicious main course offerings include "Chicken Cacciatore" and "Cajun Seafood Gumbo," along with bean dishes like "Maple Baked Pork and Beans with Apples." Side dishes such as "Roasted Garlic Risotto with Asiago" are sure to complement any meal. And pressure cooker desserts? Absolutely! Just try the "Orange Espresso Cheesecake" or "Cool Lemon
Custards with Fresh Berry Compote."

In addition to a helpful tips and kitchen wisdom that accompany the recipes, this book provides a comprehensive introduction to all aspects of pressure cooking, including guidelines for adapting your own recipes, compensating for the effects of altitude on pressure cooking, as well as a comparison of the various styles and models of cookers on the market. Whether you're new to pressure cooking or an experienced cook looking for great pressure cooker recipes, this book is a must-have for your kitchen.

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Editorial Reviews

New York Daily News
Versatile recipes, as well as a wealth of helpful tips...the eclectic collection of recipes features a number of ethnic dishes.
— Rosemary Black
New York Daily News - Rosemary Black
Versatile recipes, as well as a wealth of helpful tips...the eclectic collection of recipes features a number of ethnic dishes.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780778800286
  • Publisher: Rose, Robert Incorporated
  • Publication date: 3/3/2001
  • Pages: 192
  • Product dimensions: 6.95 (w) x 9.83 (h) x 0.54 (d)

Meet the Author

Cinda Chavich is a food writer and editor whose work has appeared in newspapers and magazines throughout North America. Her most recent book was The Wild West Cookbook.

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Read an Excerpt

Sample recipe Lamb Rogan Josh Serves 4 to 6

This is a classic Indian curry that's perfect for a party. Use lean lamb (or substitute beef) and marinate overnight for layers of deep, rich flavor. Serve the tender lamb curry with golden Indian Rice Pilau, seasoned with cinnamon, turmeric and cardamom (recipe also in book).

  • 2 lbs (1 kg) lean lamb shoulder, trimmed and cut into chunks
  • 1/2 cup (125 mL) plain yogurt
  • 4 green cardamom pods
  • 1 small cinnamon stick or 1/2 tsp (2 mL) ground cinnamon
  • 2 tsp (10 mL) paprika
  • 1 tsp (5 mL) turmeric
  • 1 tsp (5 mL) ground coriander
  • 1 tsp (5 mL) ground cumin
  • 1/2 tsp (2 mL) cayenne pepper
  • 2 tsp (10 mL) garam masala
  • 2 cups (500 mL) canned tomatoes
  • 2 cloves garlic, peeled
  • 1 large onion,
    chopped
  • 1 2-inch (5 cm) piece of ginger root
  • 3 tbsp (45 mL) vegetable oil
  • 1 cup (250 mL) water
  • 2 tbsp (25 mL) chopped cilantro
  • Cilantro springs for garnish
  1. In a bowl or zippered plastic bag, toss lamb with yogurt. In a blender or spice grinder, pulverize whole cardamom and cinnamon. Add to lamb mixture with paprika, turmeric, coriander, cumin and cayenne. Cover and refrigerate overnight.
  2. In a food processor, combine garam masala, tomatoes, garlic, onions and ginger; purée until smooth.
  3. In a pressure cooker, heat oil over medium heat. Add tomato mixture and cook for 5 minutes. Stir in lamb and marinade. Stir in water.
  4. Lock the lid in place and bring cooker up to full pressure over medium-high heat. Reduce heat to medium-low, just to maintain even pressure, and cook for 20 minutes. Remove from heat and release pressure quickly. The lamb should be fork tender. If not, return to full pressure and cook for another 5 minutes. Release pressure quickly.
  5. Remove lid and bring to boil. Reduce heat and simmer curry until nicely thickened. Stir in cilantro just before serving. Garnish with cilantro sprigs.

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Preface

Introduction When it comes to naming the kitchen tool of the millennium, I cast my vote for today's new generation of pressure cooker.

As a professional food writer, I have purchased almost every gadget and gizmo for my well-stocked kitchen. Some are the kinds that do the job nicely when you need them (which may be rarely). Some, like the microwave, are inadequate for cooking most things from scratch, but are invaluable for defrosting, steaming, melting and reheating. Others I have relegated to the culinary scrap heap — they just don't deliver acceptable results.

For many years, I had put pressure cookers in the latter category. Not that they didn't work. But the old 1950s-style cookers were a little frightening. Like most people, I had heard of some nasty disaster that occurred when a pressure cooker blew a gasket. And who needed to risk life and limb — never mind the prospect of mopping up a steam-propelled eruption of food —
just to cook dinner a little faster?

Then I began to notice that pressure cookers were starting to appear in all the best kitchen stores. These fancy new models were reportedly foolproof. And while I was skeptical, professional curiosity got the better of me. Eventually I broke down and set out to purchase one of these sexy new devices.

Looking at the new models available, it quickly became clear that these were not the same pressure cookers of a generation ago. Sleek and shiny, most were heavy-bottomed, stainless steel pots — ranging in size from that of a deep sauté pan to a large stockpot — with loads of safety devices.

Gone is the hissing, jiggly pressure regulator that always seemed unreliable at best. In its place, most modern machines have a new pressure regulator and quick-release valve, which allows you to release the steam from the pot without hauling the hot and heavy monster over to the cold water tap to cool it down.

With many of the new cookers, you are now unable to build pressure unless the lid is properly affixed; similarly, it is almost impossible to inadvertently clog the main pressure vent — and end up with lima beans all over your walls.

Still, the safety and convenience of today's new pressure cookers isn't what hooked me. It was the food.

Hands-free risotto, cooked to creamy perfection in 6 minutes. The house filled with the heady aromas of tender beef and red wine stew in half an hour. Almost-instant homemade stocks and broths, with all of the infused flavor you'd expect from hours of slow cooking.

This is what has really made the pressure cooker indispensable in my kitchen. You can't cook everything in a pressure cooker but, like a food processor, it's a tool that can save you time and energy without compromising quality.

Like many people, I am trying to eat more healthy, homemade and unprocessed foods. That means more vegetarian meals, beans and whole grains. I also want to serve more international dishes — Indian curries, Mexican black bean soups, French cassoulet and saffron-infused Spanish stews. The problem is that no one has the extra time typically required to cook these meals, especially on a busy weekday.

That's where the pressure cooker really shines. Dishes that used to take hours are now ready in just a fraction of that time. You can expect to cook a soup or stew in one-third the time (or less) when compared with a conventional recipe. Dried beans are ready to eat in anywhere from 4 to 15 minutes. Hulled barley or wheat berries are tender in less than 45 minutes.

The cooker can also save you money and culinary boredom. Now you have time to do more than the standard chicken breasts and pork cutlets: In the same time it takes to grill or sauté an expensive cut, you can have succulent short ribs, tender chicken stew or a healthy bean dish. So think about savory stew, coq au vin, or rogan josh tonight. Have a healthy grain pilaf with your grilled chicken or simmer a big pot of bean soup for lunch in less than 15 minutes. Once you serve a pot roast that tastes and smells like it's been simmering all day, you'll be hooked — guaranteed.

Unlike many of the "fad" kitchen appliances that come and go, your new pressure cooker will be one that you'll never regret buying. In fact, if you're like me, you won't know what you did without it!

Read More Show Less

Introduction

Introduction

When it comes to naming the kitchen tool of the millennium, I cast my vote for today's new generation of pressure cooker.

As a professional food writer, I have purchased almost every gadget and gizmo for my well-stocked kitchen. Some are the kinds that do the job nicely when you need them (which may be rarely). Some, like the microwave, are inadequate for cooking most things from scratch, but are invaluable for defrosting, steaming, melting and reheating. Others I have relegated to the culinary scrap heap -- they just don't deliver acceptable results.

For many years, I had put pressure cookers in the latter category. Not that they didn't work. But the old 1950s-style cookers were a little frightening. Like most people, I had heard of some nasty disaster that occurred when a pressure cooker blew a gasket. And who needed to risk life and limb -- never mind the prospect of mopping up a steam-propelled eruption of food -- just to cook dinner a little faster?

Then I began to notice that pressure cookers were starting to appear in all the best kitchen stores. These fancy new models were reportedly foolproof. And while I was skeptical, professional curiosity got the better of me. Eventually I broke down and set out to purchase one of these sexy new devices.

Looking at the new models available, it quickly became clear that these were not the same pressure cookers of a generation ago. Sleek and shiny, most were heavy-bottomed, stainless steel pots -- ranging in size from that of a deep sauté pan to a large stockpot -- with loads of safety devices.

Gone is the hissing, jiggly pressure regulator that always seemed unreliable at best. In its place, mostmodern machines have a new pressure regulator and quick-release valve, which allows you to release the steam from the pot without hauling the hot and heavy monster over to the cold water tap to cool it down.

With many of the new cookers, you are now unable to build pressure unless the lid is properly affixed; similarly, it is almost impossible to inadvertently clog the main pressure vent -- and end up with lima beans all over your walls.

Still, the safety and convenience of today's new pressure cookers isn't what hooked me. It was the food.

Hands-free risotto, cooked to creamy perfection in 6 minutes. The house filled with the heady aromas of tender beef and red wine stew in half an hour. Almost-instant homemade stocks and broths, with all of the infused flavor you'd expect from hours of slow cooking.

This is what has really made the pressure cooker indispensable in my kitchen. You can't cook everything in a pressure cooker but, like a food processor, it's a tool that can save you time and energy without compromising quality.

Like many people, I am trying to eat more healthy, homemade and unprocessed foods. That means more vegetarian meals, beans and whole grains. I also want to serve more international dishes -- Indian curries, Mexican black bean soups, French cassoulet and saffron-infused Spanish stews. The problem is that no one has the extra time typically required to cook these meals, especially on a busy weekday.

That's where the pressure cooker really shines. Dishes that used to take hours are now ready in just a fraction of that time. You can expect to cook a soup or stew in one-third the time (or less) when compared with a conventional recipe. Dried beans are ready to eat in anywhere from 4 to 15 minutes. Hulled barley or wheat berries are tender in less than 45 minutes.

The cooker can also save you money and culinary boredom. Now you have time to do more than the standard chicken breasts and pork cutlets: In the same time it takes to grill or sauté an expensive cut, you can have succulent short ribs, tender chicken stew or a healthy bean dish. So think about savory stew, coq au vin, or rogan josh tonight. Have a healthy grain pilaf with your grilled chicken or simmer a big pot of bean soup for lunch in less than 15 minutes. Once you serve a pot roast that tastes and smells like it's been simmering all day, you'll be hooked -- guaranteed.

Unlike many of the "fad" kitchen appliances that come and go, your new pressure cooker will be one that you'll never regret buying. In fact, if you're like me, you won't know what you did without it!

Read More Show Less

Recipe

Sample recipe

Lamb Rogan Josh

Serves 4 to 6

This is a classic Indian curry that's perfect for a party. Use lean lamb (or substitute beef) and marinate overnight for layers of deep, rich flavor. Serve the tender lamb curry with golden Indian Rice Pilau, seasoned with cinnamon, turmeric and cardamom (recipe also in book).

  • 2 lbs (1 kg) lean lamb shoulder, trimmed and cut into chunks
  • 1/2 cup (125 mL) plain yogurt
  • 4 green cardamom pods
  • 1 small cinnamon stick or 1/2 tsp (2 mL) ground cinnamon
  • 2 tsp (10 mL) paprika
  • 1 tsp (5 mL) turmeric
  • 1 tsp (5 mL) ground coriander
  • 1 tsp (5 mL) ground cumin
  • 1/2 tsp (2 mL) cayenne pepper
  • 2 tsp (10 mL) garam masala
  • 2 cups (500 mL) canned tomatoes
  • 2 cloves garlic, peeled
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 1 2-inch (5 cm) piece of ginger root
  • 3 tbsp (45 mL) vegetable oil
  • 1 cup (250 mL) water
  • 2 tbsp (25 mL) chopped cilantro
  • Cilantro springs for garnish
  1. In a bowl or zippered plastic bag, toss lamb with yogurt. In a blender or spice grinder, pulverize whole cardamom and cinnamon. Add to lamb mixture with paprika, turmeric, coriander, cumin and cayenne. Cover and refrigerate overnight.

  2. In a food processor, combine garam masala, tomatoes, garlic, onions and ginger; pure until smooth.

  3. In a pressure cooker, heat oil over medium heat. Add tomato mixture and cook for 5 minutes. Stir in lamb and marinade. Stir in water.

  4. Lock the lid in place and bring cooker up to full pressure over medium-high heat. Reduce heat to medium-low, just to maintain even pressure, and cook for 20 minutes. Remove from heat and release pressure quickly. The lamb should befork tender. If not, return to full pressure and cook for another 5 minutes. Release pressure quickly.

  5. Remove lid and bring to boil. Reduce heat and simmer curry until nicely thickened. Stir in cilantro just before serving. Garnish with cilantro sprigs.
Read More Show Less

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