The Bible for Blockheads

( 2 )

Overview

If you have a hard time making sense of the Bible, The Bible for Blockheads is for you. It will transform what might seem like gobbledygook into incredible significance — enough to change your life. It can do that because the Bible is more amazing than you've ever dreamed, packed with riches, and making sense of it is no mystery. You'll even have fun as you learn! The Bible for Blockheads helps you: - Discover how the Bible's message unfolds from start to finish - Learn how the Bible developed over many centuries...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (20) from $1.99   
  • New (5) from $20.50   
  • Used (15) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$20.50
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(57)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
9 X 7.30 X 1.20 inches; 464 pages

Ships from: Victor, MT

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$24.78
Seller since 2006

Feedback rating:

(134)

Condition: New
1999-09-01 Paperback annotated edition New New! Excellent condition! Choose Expedited Shipping for Fast 2-3 Business Day Delivery!

Ships from: Spring Hill, KS

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$33.50
Seller since 2009

Feedback rating:

(32)

Condition: New
1999 Trade paperback Annotated. New. No dust jacket as issued. NEW...Kept in plastic wrap. Trade paperback (US). Glued binding. 463 p. Contains: Illustrations. Audience: ... General/trade. Read more Show Less

Ships from: Branson, MO

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$36.43
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(259)

Condition: New
Brand New Item.

Ships from: Chatham, NJ

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$45.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(146)

Condition: New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

If you have a hard time making sense of the Bible, The Bible for Blockheads is for you. It will transform what might seem like gobbledygook into incredible significance — enough to change your life. It can do that because the Bible is more amazing than you've ever dreamed, packed with riches, and making sense of it is no mystery. You'll even have fun as you learn! The Bible for Blockheads helps you: - Discover how the Bible's message unfolds from start to finish - Learn how the Bible developed over many centuries - Familiarize yourself with the main divisions of the Bible and its 66 individual books - Find out proven principles for accurately interpreting what you read - Acquaint yourself with important people, places, and events of the Bible - Learn key biblical terms and discover the different types of literature represented in the Scriptures - Get a handle on the Bible's historical and cultural background - Discover why the Bible among all books is called 'God's Word'

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
This "user-friendly" introduction to the Bible--like Larry Richards's The Bible: God's Word for the Biblically Inept (LJ 2/15/99)--is for those embarking on Bible study for the first time. A brief introduction presents an overview of the Bible, its history, and approaches to studying it; each chapter contains a summary of a biblical book and is sprinkled with historical and archaeological tidbits; five "Tool Time" essays, placed throughout the volume, introduce readers to commentaries, concordances, dictionaries, and atlases. Organized in a pleasing, easy-to-navigate manner, the book is casually pastoral and at times humorous--at one point, for example, Connelly (pastor of Cross Church in Flint, MI) asks of Queen Esther, "What's a nice Jewish girl like you doing in a place like this?" But, although he sometimes mentions a range of competing biblical interpretations, theologically Connelly is firmly conservative. And while this book would be more or less suitable for most academic libraries, its devotional orientation make it most appropriate for church libraries.--Craig W. Beard, Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham Lib. Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780310222675
  • Publisher: Zondervan
  • Publication date: 8/6/1999
  • Pages: 464
  • Product dimensions: 7.28 (w) x 9.40 (h) x 1.20 (d)

Meet the Author

Douglas Connelly (MDiv, University of Michigan; MTh, Grace Theological Seminary) is the senior pastor of Parkside Community Church in Sterling Heights, Michigan, and an adjunct professor at Spring Arbor University. He is the author of several books, including The Bible for Blockheads, The Book of Revelation for Blockheads, and Amazing Discoveries That Unlock the Bible.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

The Bible: What's with It?

Heads Up

Discover how the Bible was written -- and how it survived.

Learn to find your way around quickly.

Find out what role God played in the production of the Bible.

The word Bible means "the book." The Bible is one book, but it is also a collection of books. Sixty-six books were written over 1, 600 years by at least forty different authors. You will find just about every kind of writing in the Bible -- love letters, songs, historical records, diaries, visions of the future, genealogies, suicide notes. The Bible was the first book printed on a printing press, and it still outsells all other books in the marketplace. You can get the Bible on audio, on video, and online. It has been translated into more languages and has been quoted more and memorized more than any book in human history.

The Bible is divided into two main sections -- the Old Testament and the New Testament. The Old Testament focuses on God's interaction with the people of Israel. The New Testament, written later, focuses on Jesus and his early followers called Christians. The word testament means "treaty or covenant," an agreement made between two people. God entered into a contract with the people of Israel in the Old Testament. God's new contract (in the New Testament) is made with anyone who will commit to following Jesus. In each testament the terms of the agreement are spelled out. The Bible is an instruction manual for people who want to do what pleases God.

The Old Testament

The first and longest major division of the Bible is called the Old Testament by Christians. (Jewish people refer to it as the Hebrew Bible.) Thirty-nine individual biblical books are included in the Old Testament. Some of the books are named for their author -- like the book of Daniel. Daniel was a prophet, or spokesperson, for God who wrote that particular book. Some books are named for their main characters, who may or may not be the author. The book of Joshua is about a great leader named Joshua. The book of Esther is about a Jewish girl who became a courageous queen. Joshua probably was the author of his book. Esther probably was not the writer of the book about her.

Other Old Testament books get their names because of the story they tell. The book of Exodus, for example, tells the story of the nation of Israel's "exit" from Egypt. The books of Kings talk about (you guessed it) Israel's kings. Some books have unusual names that don't make much sense in English -- Leviticus, Ecclesiastes, Psalms. (I've tried to give some explanation of these titles in the Help File section of each of these books.)

Originally the Old Testament was written in two languages. Most of it was written in Hebrew. Small sections of a few books were written in a language related to Hebrew called Aramaic.

Here's what Hebrew looks like in a modern Hebrew Bible:

Hebrew is read from right to left (the opposite of English) and from the top line of the page to the bottom line (the same as English). The large blocky letters are the consonants (twenty-two in the Hebrew alphabet). The dots and small marks above or below the consonants are vowels or vowel "points." When the Old Testament was first composed, Hebrew was written with no vowels and no word divisions (mostly to conserve room on very expensive writing material). Word divisions were made about a.d. 100. Vowel marks were added in the ninth or tenth century a.d. to preserve the correct pronunciation of the ancient Hebrew language.

Hebrew is a very expressive language. It is a language suited to stories and poetry -- exactly the forms found most often in the Old Testament.

The New Testament

The second main section of the Bible is the New Testament (twenty-seven biblical books). Just as in the Old Testament, some of these books are named for their author. The gospel of John, for example, is the story of Jesus (a gospel) written by one of Jesus' followers (John). Other books are named for their content. The book of Acts records the "acts," or deeds, of the early Christians. Many of the New Testament books are letters and are named for those who first read the letter. Ephesians, for example, is a letter sent to the Christians in the city of Ephesus. People living in the city of Corinth were called Corinthians -- and we have two letters to the Corinthian Christians (1 and 2 Corinthians).

The New Testament was originally written in Greek. When the story of the New Testament opened, Rome ruled the world of Europe and North Africa, but the universal language of the Roman Empire was Greek, not Latin. The New Testament was written in "street Greek." It was not the difficult language of the scholars, but the everyday language of the people. Today it looks like this in a printed Greek New Testament:

Greek is read from left to right just like English. While Hebrew is a poetic language, Greek is a very precise language. Its words and structure are more rigid than Hebrew. It is a great language for precise, clear communication.

A Survival Story

The original documents of the Bible have all disappeared, but copies of the originals have survived. We take making copies for granted. Every drugstore and post office has a twenty-five-cent copy machine. Before the printing press, however, every copy of a book or letter had to be made by hand. Some of the most respected people in society were scribes, those who could write or copy words. Think of how long it would take you to copy by hand even one book of the Bible or the latest John Grisham novel! People in the ancient world copied only the most important or treasured documents.

Hand-produced copies of the Hebrew Old Testament and the Greek New Testament are called manuscripts. Some of the manuscripts we possess are very old. We are confident that these manuscripts are accurate copies of the original writings because the Jews and later the Christians who copied the text took extreme care in their work. They were fanatics about accuracy!

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Contents Welcome The Bible: What's with It?
Getting Started Tool Time: Study Bibles Part 1: Foundations Genesis Chart: Abraham's Family Exodus Chart: The Tabernacle Tool Time: Commentaries Leviticus Numbers Map: Israel's Wilderness Journey and Entry into Canaan Deuteronomy How the Old Testament Fits Together: Exodus and Conquest Part 2: Story Joshua People of the Bible: The Canaanites Judges Chart: The Judges of Israel Ruth
1 Samuel People of the Bible: The Philistines
2 Samuel
1 and 2 Kings How the Old Testament Fits Together: Israel's Kingdom
1 and 2 Chronicles Ezra Map: Return Routes from Babylon People of the Bible: The Persians How the Old Testament Fits Together: Return from Exile Map: The Persian Empire Nehemiah Esther Part 3: Drama Job Tool Time: Concordances Part 4: Worship Psalms Part 5: Wisdom Proverbs Ecclesiastes Song of Songs Part 6: Prophets Chart: The Ministries of the Prophets Isaiah Jeremiah Map: The Neo-Babylonian Empire People of the Bible: The Babylonians Lamentations Ezekiel Daniel Chart: The Minor Prophets Hosea Joel Amos Tool Time: Bible Dictionaries Obadiah Jonah People of the Bible: The Assyrians Micah Nahum Habakkuk Zephaniah Haggai Zechariah Malachi Part 7: Gospels Matthew Map: Palestine in Jesus' Day Mark Luke John Part 8: History Acts Map: Paul's First Missionary Journey Map: Paul's Second Missionary Journey Map: Paul's Third Missionary Journey Tool Time: Bible Atlases Part 9: Letters Romans Map: The Roman Empire People of the Bible: The Romans
1 Corinthians
2 Corinthians Galatians Ephesians Philippians Colossians
1 Thessalonians
2 Thessalonians
1 Timothy
2 Timothy Titus Philemon Hebrews James
1 Peter
2 Peter John's Letters Jude Revelation Acknowledgments

Read More Show Less

First Chapter

The Bible: What's with It?
Heads Up Discover how the Bible was written — and how it survived.
Learn to find your way around quickly.
Find out what role God played in the production of the Bible.
The word Bible means 'the book.' The Bible is one book, but it is also a collection of books. Sixty-six books were written over 1,600 years by at least forty different authors. You will find just about every kind of writing in the Bible — love letters, songs, historical records, diaries, visions of the future, genealogies, suicide notes. The Bible was the first book printed on a printing press, and it still outsells all other books in the marketplace. You can get the Bible on audio, on video, and online. It has been translated into more languages and has been quoted more and memorized more than any book in human history.
The Bible is divided into two main sections — the Old Testament and the New Testament. The Old Testament focuses on God's interaction with the people of Israel. The New Testament, written later, focuses on Jesus and his early followers called Christians. The word testament means 'treaty or covenant,' an agreement made between two people. God entered into a contract with the people of Israel in the Old Testament. God's new contract (in the New Testament) is made with anyone who will commit to following Jesus. In each testament the terms of the agreement are spelled out. The Bible is an instruction manual for people who want to do what pleases God.
The Old Testament The first and longest major division of the Bible is called the Old Testament by Christians. (Jewish people refer to it as the Hebrew Bible.) Thirty-nine individual biblical books are included in the Old Testament. Some of the books are named for their author — like the book of Daniel. Daniel was a prophet, or spokesperson, for God who wrote that particular book. Some books are named for their main characters, who may or may not be the author. The book of Joshua is about a great leader named Joshua. The book of Esther is about a Jewish girl who became a courageous queen. Joshua probably was the author of his book. Esther probably was not the writer of the book about her.
Other Old Testament books get their names because of the story they tell. The book of Exodus, for example, tells the story of the nation of Israel's 'exit' from Egypt. The books of Kings talk about (you guessed it) Israel's kings. Some books have unusual names that don't make much sense in English — Leviticus, Ecclesiastes, Psalms. (I've tried to give some explanation of these titles in the Help File section of each of these books.)
Originally the Old Testament was written in two languages. Most of it was written in Hebrew. Small sections of a few books were written in a language related to Hebrew called Aramaic.
Here's what Hebrew looks like in a modern Hebrew Bible:
Hebrew is read from right to left (the opposite of English) and from the top line of the page to the bottom line (the same as English). The large blocky letters are the consonants (twenty-two in the Hebrew alphabet). The dots and small marks above or below the consonants are vowels or vowel 'points.' When the Old Testament was first composed, Hebrew was written with no vowels and no word divisions (mostly to conserve room on very expensive writing material). Word divisions were made about a.d. 100. Vowel marks were added in the ninth or tenth century a.d. to preserve the correct pronunciation of the ancient Hebrew language.
Hebrew is a very expressive language. It is a language suited to stories and poetry — exactly the forms found most often in the Old Testament.
The New Testament The second main section of the Bible is the New Testament (twenty-seven biblical books). Just as in the Old Testament, some of these books are named for their author. The gospel of John, for example, is the story of Jesus (a gospel) written by one of Jesus' followers (John). Other books are named for their content. The book of Acts records the 'acts,' or deeds, of the early Christians. Many of the New Testament books are letters and are named for those who first read the letter. Ephesians, for example, is a letter sent to the Christians in the city of Ephesus. People living in the city of Corinth were called Corinthians — and we have two letters to the Corinthian Christians (1 and 2 Corinthians).
The New Testament was originally written in Greek. When the story of the New Testament opened, Rome ruled the world of Europe and North Africa, but the universal language of the Roman Empire was Greek, not Latin. The New Testament was written in 'street Greek.' It was not the difficult language of the scholars, but the everyday language of the people. Today it looks like this in a printed Greek New Testament:
Greek is read from left to right just like English. While Hebrew is a poetic language, Greek is a very precise language. Its words and structure are more rigid than Hebrew. It is a great language for precise, clear communication.
A Survival Story The original documents of the Bible have all disappeared, but copies of the originals have survived. We take making copies for granted. Every drugstore and post office has a twenty-five-cent copy machine. Before the printing press, however, every copy of a book or letter had to be made by hand. Some of the most respected people in society were scribes, those who could write or copy words. Think of how long it would take you to copy by hand even one book of the Bible or the latest John Grisham novel! People in the ancient world copied only the most important or treasured documents.
Hand-produced copies of the Hebrew Old Testament and the Greek New Testament are called manuscripts. Some of the manuscripts we possess are very old. We are confident that these manuscripts are accurate copies of the original writings because the Jews and later the Christians who copied the text took extreme care in their work. They were fanatics about accuracy!

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 2 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(2)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 4, 2003

    For More than Blockheads

    This is a great way for anyone, familiar or not with the Bible, to learn even more. It's not over the average person's head and can be understood by most ages. Doug Connelly is no longer in Flint - beginning in June he will be pastoring the Parkside Community Church on Dodge Park Road in Sterling Heights, Michigan.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 11, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)