The Big Happy

( 1 )

Overview

"Is a moment of pure happiness worth all the pain along the way? David certainly thinks so; he has left behind his comfortable career as a TV producer for a shot at the big happy. But while he waits for his novel to sell, his life is falling down around him. He's almost thirty, he's single, and his apartment is the size of a Tic Tac. To pay the bills, he takes on work as a downmarket DJ, doing weddings and bar mitzvahs for chump change. At least he has his friends, or does he?" His best friend Annie is about to marry a man David dubs "Rat Boy" ...
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Overview

"Is a moment of pure happiness worth all the pain along the way? David certainly thinks so; he has left behind his comfortable career as a TV producer for a shot at the big happy. But while he waits for his novel to sell, his life is falling down around him. He's almost thirty, he's single, and his apartment is the size of a Tic Tac. To pay the bills, he takes on work as a downmarket DJ, doing weddings and bar mitzvahs for chump change. At least he has his friends, or does he?" His best friend Annie is about to marry a man David dubs "Rat Boy" and disappear forever. David's trusty bachelor buds Dustin and Cameron are doing the unthinkable and settling down, while Zach, the model of cool, as aloof and evasive as a wisp of smoke, is harboring a secret that could capsize the whole crew. On top of everything, David finds himself falling in love with Janey, an alluring younger woman whose knack for witty repartee is matched only by her instability.
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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
A young, struggling New York writer, David Holden is elated when an agent deems his unpublished novel a surefire hit in the emerging genre of "dump lit" (fiction for the "heartless shitheads" who casually dump women). David himself, the returning lead character from Mebus's Booty Nomad is likable enough; hardly the hardcore player, he's a loyal friend, and his insecurities and na vet tend to manifest as sensitivity and indecisiveness rather than whininess. His budding romance with emotional wreck Janey Finegold rings true, as do his asides on the writing process ("I have to force myself"). But when David and his small cadre of friends set out to ruin the wedding of his childhood chum Annie (he's obsessed with her), they resort to schemes even Lucy and Ethel would find crass and outlandish-but that's part of the point. Only when Janey brings it to David's attention does he, intentionally far behind readers, finally consider that his obsession may be what's keeping Annie from exchanging vows with fianc "Rat Boy." Knowing that doesn't spoil the Friends-like sweetness. (June) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
News flash: Many men are afraid of commitment. David, the protagonist of the second novel by Mebus (Booty Nomad, 2004), is a young Manhattanite whose ambition is surpassed only by his shallow self-regard. He jettisoned a lucrative career in TV production to concentrate on his novel, which is inspired by his last breakup, and he bemoans the fact that his friends are doing crazy stuff like hooking up and settling down. (Clearly they ought to be living a lifestyle more like his, which involves collecting rejection letters, occupying a shoebox apartment and being barely competent at his weekend job as a wedding deejay.) David adores his tribe for being "sarcastic, overly intellectual, competitive smart-asses," so he's pained by the transformation of his friend Annie, who's engaged to a decent fellow David takes to calling Rat Boy. He dubs another friend's girlfriend Donkey Girl, and pretty quickly it's clear that anybody who enjoys conjuring up infantile nicknames for his friends' significant others is the guy with the problem. But though Mebus acknowledges that David could stand to grow up a little, he's oddly confident that this egotistical, emotionally stunted fool is some kind of hero. The snark just keeps on coming, with David stubbornly cracking wise about his quirky (but less-brilliant) friends and family members. His love interest is a woman named Janey who waitresses at many of the weddings at which David deejays, and she's interested in getting into TV production and-well, enough about Janey, what about David's needs? The plot centers less on any would-be romance than on David's efforts to wreck the relationship between Annie and Rat Boy with the help of Zach, who's a stereotypetwofer (trust-fund brat; promiscuous gay man). David eventually reaches the stunning conclusion that maybe, just maybe, people are allowed to make choices others may disagree with; most people could figure that out without being fed 300-plus pages of bad jokes. Wearying fluff.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781401352561
  • Publisher: Miramax Books
  • Publication date: 6/21/2006
  • Pages: 384
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.25 (h) x 0.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Scott Mebus is a novelist, songwriter, playwright, comic, and music producer. His rock musical Tarnish appeared in the New York International Fringe Festival. Most recently, Scott was a producer for MTV and VH1, where he worked on the Tom Green Show, Real World, and MTV Yoga. He lives in New York City.
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Table of Contents

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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 31, 2006

    Laugh Out Loud

    I started reading this book in barnes and noble to kill some time one day and i was hooked! i ended up buying the book... its sarcastic, its laugh out loud funny, the character Dave says & thinks the things we all WANT to say.... i love that he nicknames his ex, i Love that his apartment is trying to kill him and i LOVE that he quit a niceee paying job to find his 'big happy' i didn't finish the book yet but sooo far im lovin it!!

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