The Big Miss: My Years Coaching Tiger Woods

( 49 )

Overview

The Big Miss is Hank Haney's candid and surprisingly insightful account of his tumultuous six-year journey with Tiger Woods, during which the supremely gifted golfer collected six major championships and rewrote golf history. Hank was one of the very few people allowed behind the curtain. He was with Tiger 110 days a year, spoke to him over 200 days a year, and stayed at his home up to 30 days a year, observing him in nearly every circumstance:...

See more details below
Hardcover
$16.98
BN.com price
(Save 34%)$26.00 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (100) from $1.99   
  • New (13) from $9.00   
  • Used (87) from $1.99   
The Big Miss: My Years Coaching Tiger Woods

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$11.99
BN.com price

Overview

The Big Miss is Hank Haney's candid and surprisingly insightful account of his tumultuous six-year journey with Tiger Woods, during which the supremely gifted golfer collected six major championships and rewrote golf history. Hank was one of the very few people allowed behind the curtain. He was with Tiger 110 days a year, spoke to him over 200 days a year, and stayed at his home up to 30 days a year, observing him in nearly every circumstance: at tournaments, on the practice range, over meals, with his wife, Elin, and relaxing with friends.

The relationship between the two men began in March 2004 when Hank received a call from Tiger in which the golf champion asked him to be his coach. It was a call that would change both men's lives.

Tiger—only 28 at the time—was by then already an icon, judged by the sporting press as not only one of the best golfers ever, but possibly the best athlete ever. Already he was among the world's highest paid celebrities. There was an air of mystery surrounding him, an aura of invincibility. Unique among athletes, Tiger seemed to be able to shrug off any level of pressure and find a way to win.

But Tiger was always looking to improve, and he wanted Hank's help.

What Hank soon came to appreciate was that Tiger was one of the most complicated individuals he'd ever met, let alone coached. Although Hank had worked with hundreds of elite golfers and was not easily impressed, there were days watching Tiger on the range when Hank couldn't believe what he was witnessing. On those days, it was impossible to imagine another human playing golf so perfectly.

And yet Tiger is human—and Hank's expert eye was adept at spotting where Tiger's perfection ended and an opportunity for improvement existed. Always haunting Tiger was his fear of "the big miss"—the wildly inaccurate golf shot that can ruin an otherwise solid round—and it was because that type of blunder was sometimes part of Tiger's game that Hank carefully redesigned his swing mechanics.

Hank's most formidable coaching challenge, though, would be solving the riddle of Tiger's personality. Wary of the emotional distractions that might diminish his game and put him further from his goals, Tiger had developed a variety of tactics to keep people from getting too close, and not even Hank—or Tiger's family and friends, for that matter—was spared "the treatment."

Toward the end of Tiger and Hank's time together, the champion's laser-like focus began to blur and he became less willing to put in punishing hours practicing—a disappointment to Hank, who saw in Tiger's behavior signs that his pupil had developed a conflicted relationship with the game. Hints that Tiger hungered to reinvent himself were present in his bizarre infatuation with elite military training, and—in a development Hank didn't see coming—in the scandal that would make headlines in late 2009. It all added up to a big miss that Hank, try as he might, couldn't save Tiger from.

There's never been a book about Tiger Woods that is as intimate and revealing—or one so wise about what it takes to coach a superstar athlete.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble

It was in March 2004 that Hank Haney received the phone call for which every golf coach dreams. On the other end of the call was Tiger Woods, asking Haney to become his mentor. During the next six years, the number one golfer in the world would add six major championships to his trophy case and Haney would become a central part of Woods' and his family's life, spending hundreds of days with the athlete and becoming a frequent visitor at his home. During that time, the coach never suspected that Tiger had lapsed into extreme infidelity, but he did spot unmistakable signs that his secretive client-friend's commitment to his lifelong vocation had become conflicted, damaging his finely-tuned game. A first-person account of a great athlete at the crossroads; now in trade paperback and NOOK Book.

Kirkus Reviews
An insider's look at a champion's rise and fall. There's something both profoundly sad and profoundly satisfying about watching a former spouse, partner or friend crumble. So it is with Haney, host of the Golf Channel show The Haney Project, who opens with a vignette of standing 10 feet from his student Tiger Woods at the 2010 Masters and getting--well, nothing except blown off. "He's become less of a golfer," Haney concludes, "and he's never going to be the same again." As well known now for personal scandal and strange shortcomings as for a particularly brilliant approach to the game of golf, Woods emerges here as a mercurial, difficult character who meets discipline with indiscipline and genius with mulishness. Over the years, Haney corrected strokes and stances, taught the geography of the course, and issued pointed critiques. All this will be meaningful to golf aficionados, though the big news for less tee-crazed types comes with Woods' apparent efforts to become a Navy SEAL and leave golf behind. "There is a strong likelihood," writes Haney portentously, "that a Kill House is where Tiger did serious damage to his career." Read the book for details of said Kill House, but be warned that the indifferently written narrative is stocked with standard sports clichés, though full of junkie-pleasing stats--e.g., "In nine official events on the 2011 PGA Tour, Tiger hit only 48.9 percent of his fairways, a career-low number in driving accuracy that ranked him 186th on the tour." Woods has won big and lost bigger, and not just on the green, and he probably merits a more insightful book--though Haney does provide some good tips for would-be pros.
From the Publisher
“Insightful...Advance coverage of The Big Miss focused on the sensational...but those revelations misrepresent the primary focus of the book, which is to convey the experience of working with Woods as an instructor and to dissect what makes Tiger Tiger...Golf fans will put the book down feeling as if they were an eyewitness to history, and glad for the experience.”
--Wall Street Journal
 
“An alarming look at an athlete whose public glories masked a day-to-day existence of profound superficiality…Even more revealing than the swing material is evidence of Woods’ emotional blank wall: his indifference to people around him, his inability to empathize, and an obsession with military training and the Navy SEALs that, according to Haney, probably led to the leg injuries which have hampered Woods’ golf career.”
--Golfweek
 
“I learned more about Tiger in The Big Miss than I have in eleven years of covering him on the PGA Tour…
I actually thought the book was very fair, it was honest.”
--Damon Hack, Senior Writer, Sports Illustrated

“While The Big Miss is many things -- a coach’s story; an account of a collapse; a deep dive into the swing mechanics and the art of golf – it also offers a welcome and unvarnished look inside.  Books about major athletes are often authorized pabulum or arm’s-length agglomerations.  Haney’s recollections are his own, and subject to dispute, but this is a rich and compelling rendering of a complicated athlete undone less by embarrassing details than by a self-inflicted, unsustainable myth.”
--Jason Gay, The Wall Street Journal
 
“Offers fascinating insights…The biggest strength of The Big Miss is the breadth of its insider view of the Tiger Woods phenomenon, a scrutiny previously unavailable to the public.”
--Kansas City Star

“Incredibly interesting—especially if you play golf...Haney does a great job of simply telling it like it is...The "why" behind the mystery of Tiger's perplexing personality weaves its way through the entire book.”
-David G. Kindervater, Featured Columnist, Bleacher Report
 
“After flying through this 247-page, mostly breezy and fascinating look into the life of a champion, I suspect most readers will ultimately have a newfound respect for Woods. I know I do....For the first time in the history of golf literature, we get a behind-the-scenes look at how an all-time great works. Many times the details are not pretty, but most of the journey Haney takes us on reveals a relentless passion to thrive in an era when so many professionals appear content to occasionally contend and collect healthy checks.  If I were asked to recommend a book for an aspiring young golfer, The Big Miss would be the first title I’d select if for no other reason than most of today’s Tiger-wannabes will be motivated to work much harder than they currently do.”
--GeoffShackelford.com

“Thoughtful…Haney makes his case fairly and honestly, emerging not as a self-serving, tell-all author but as a man who has devoted his working life to the intricacies of the golf swing and who, finally, remains thankful to have spent six years with the best golfer on the planet.”
--Booklist

"The Big Miss is the most extensive and interesting portrait of Woods you're ever likely to read...[it] shines a light on the most opaque celebrity in sports. For that reason alone, it's a can't-miss."
--Orange County Register

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780307985989
  • Publisher: Crown Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 3/27/2012
  • Pages: 272
  • Sales rank: 322,549
  • Product dimensions: 6.40 (w) x 9.30 (h) x 1.20 (d)

Meet the Author

Hank Haney

Hank Haney is widely recognized as one of the outstanding teachers in golf. The results of his teaching method were most recently seen in pupil Mark O'Meara, who last year won both the Masters and British Open en route to being named PGA Tour Player of the Year. Haney has been named one of Golf Magazine's Top 100 Teachers, was selected as the 1 993 National PGA Teacher of the Year, and has been a member of the Golf Digest Professional Advisory Staff since 1 991. He lives outside Dallas, Texas, where he operates the Hank Haney Golf Ranch.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

1 The Last Time 1

2 Beginnings 8

3 Coaching Tiger 37

4 Greatness 84

5 Distraction 134

6 Highest Mountain 167

7 Quitting 193

8 Adding It Up 229

Acknowledgments 249

Tiger Woods's Worldwide Performance Record While Hank Haney Was His Coach 251

Glossary of Golf Terms 255

Index of Names 259

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 49 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(12)

4 Star

(15)

3 Star

(14)

2 Star

(4)

1 Star

(4)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 49 Customer Reviews
  • Posted April 2, 2012

    A Good Read

    I'd seen Tiger's comments about the book. I heard lots of opinion and speculation about the book. I'd heard everyone take shots at Haney for being unprofessional and breaking some student-coach unwritten confidentiality rule. So I decided to read the book.

    Let me preface my comments and say that I am not a Tiger fan. I think he is the greatest golfer I have ever seen. But he has never been my cup of tea. He never looks happy, doesn't seem to be having fun, and generally seems like a miserable person to be stuck with on the course. I observed him in person at the 2005 British Open and he did nothing to change my mind. If anything, watching him in person only strengthened my opinion.

    Tiger should thank Haney for writing this book. It has (somewhat) changed my opinion of Tiger - for the better. I have a little better insight into why he is the best, and why, for him, that means that he will come off as distant and unconnected. I am far more sympathetic about the pressure of "being Tiger Woods" and feel sorry that he never really got to be a regular guy.

    When Tiger's scandal broke, I found it hard to believe that Stevie Williams, his caddie or Haney had no knowledge concerning Tiger’s behavior. After reading the book I’m left with little doubt that Tiger was very effective in keeping them in the dark. Haney relates an exchange with Williams where Williams complains that Tiger spoke to him twice in an entire round of golf. The picture painted is that Tiger kept everyone at some distance, even those who from the outside, appeared to be very close to him.

    If you’re looking for juicy gossip - don’t bother. Haney’s focus is mostly on golf and any personal details about his interaction with Tiger are related in some way to golf. For example, Haney relates a couple of instances where Tiger is cheap - either not tipping / not tipping enough or having someone else grab a check. (There are plenty of stories about Tiger being cheap - nothing new here.) Haney tells these stories in the context that Tiger operates in a focused, insular manner - precisely what makes him the best in the world. If Tiger were looser, more laid back, more fun loving (think Trevino or Couples) would he be more likable? Undoubtably. Would he be the best in the world? Who knows.

    All in all, a quick, enjoyable read.

    24 out of 25 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 7, 2012

    I am not a fan of TW or his behavior. Although many people have

    I am not a fan of TW or his behavior. Although many people have portrayed this book as a betrayal of TW by Haney, I think Haney's book is generally favorable to TW. While I don't condone TW's behavior, I understand his lonely existence and feel for him.

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 4, 2012

    Good read

    I'm not a Tiger fan, however after reading this book, I appreciate him for what he truly is.. a great golfer and nothing more. Hank does a great job shedding light on why Tiger is the way he is. The only downside to the book is all the technical verbage about the ins and outs of Tigers golf swing.

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 13, 2012

    If your looking for the dirt on Tiger's dirt it's not here. Rath

    If your looking for the dirt on Tiger's dirt it's not here. Rather it's a story of how selfabsorbed a superstar is to get to the very highest level of a sport.
    Tiger isn't a very nice person but you must admire the inside view of how much work he did to get to the top

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 11, 2012

    The Big Miss is awful

    After slogging though this book of Hank Haney constantly patting himself on the back for all things that are golf, I have more respect for Tiger and none at all for Hank. What a waste of money!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 24, 2014

    Conflicted

    For a long time, I would not read this book because I was not interested in gossip or Tiger-bashing by an ex-coach. This is not because I am a fan of Tiger's but simply because I prefer not to fill my mind with pettiness of such kind.

    Thanks to countless reviews on this site that emphasized that the book primarily focuses on Woods' swing and training, I finally took the plunge, particularly because I was looking for some insight as to how the golfer might handle this latest setback and how he got to this point in the first place.

    The reviews were correct. The overwhelming majority of the content spoke to Tiger's swing changes and his mental wiring.

    The author wrote that he wanted to work with Woods to get a glimpse into the mind of someone who performed and dominated at the level set by Tiger. We find that ultimately Haney didn't much understand or care for what he saw.

    Most insightful, though, were tidbits about the degree to which Tiger trained with the SEALs, that following his father's death, he considered leaving golf and likewise joining the Special Forces, and how mentally tough he was to play and win with fractures in his leg. The reader also learned that Tiger was a nerd, sometimes finds it hard to maintain his intensity and drive as far as practicing the minutia goes, and is somewhat socially awkward, the latter of which really isn't all that surprising given that Woods has been on a singular mission for most of his reasoned life.

    It seems, too, from Haney's writing that Tiger also lost a part of himself with his dad's passing, and also began to question his existence and his desire leading up to and following the fiasco of 1999 (bimbo-gate).

    Haney left Woods in 2010 because, according to Haney, he hoped that Tiger would come back from rehab a changed man. This is where I encounter some ambiguity about the book and Haney's motives for writing it. On the one hand he claims to have wanted to coach Tiger to study the mind of an athlete of Tiger's level. Then upon getting to see it up close and personal, he decided he didn't much care for what he saw, but instead of simply accepting it for what it was, sought change in the wiring. When that didn't happen he quit during one of his Pupil's greatest time of need.

    What is more, Haney insisted that he wanted a closer relationship to Tiger and to get into his inner circle. Given that when Haney didn't get that, he then turned around and wrote a book about Tiger, in hindsight, one can only applaud Woods' wisdom in not letting Haney get closer. Goodness knows to what we would then have been privy in the pages of this book had Haney had greater access to Woods.

    All in all I give the book three stars. I did enjoy reading about Woods and his golf journey in greater detail. I take off two stars, though, because I do have issues with the betrayal of trust on Haney's part that allowed me to do so.

    The book reads quickly and easily, and is well constructed and organized. The statistical analysis of Woods' record versus other golf greats is truly insightful and was one of my most lasting takeaways from "The Big Miss."

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 22, 2012

    Great book

    Great book

    Did awesome job showing the different sides of tiger that the media never saw

    Only part i didnt care for was defending hanks records vs tigers previous trainers

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 10, 2012

    This is a book about a jerk written by a jerk. I do; however, gi

    This is a book about a jerk written by a jerk. I do; however, give Haney credit for sticking to the golf aspect of his relationship with TW.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 8, 2012

    Good reading

    Makes your think about a lot of the past

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 3, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    This book didn't offer any stunning revelations especially after

    This book didn't offer any stunning revelations especially after how the media saturated the public with details about Wood's personal life. Hanley appears to be an excellent golf pro who's proud of his accomplishments-the book does offer insights into the game and yet we get a sense he was dismayed at the way Tiger acted. The few glimpses he offers into the world we don't see confirm Tiger is at best immature and self-absorbed. Yes, Woods is a product of his upbringing and his unprofessional behavior speaks volumes. Before and after his melt-down he never looked happy playing golf and after reading the book this reader who's taken with the old-school golf legends would hope the Nicklaus records stands forever.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 1, 2012

    Highly Recommended

    This book was a fun and easy read! Getting insight into the best golfers world allows you to understand the big picture much clearer! I would recommend this book to all!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 14, 2012

    On Target

    Not sure why Hank is getting bashed. This insightful book is more about a teacher and his student and what the teacher has to do to make a number one player even better. Could he have left out personal references to his top client, sure, but that was part of his experience and influenced their relationship. I think Hank is overly fair in his analysis and enjoyed the read.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 21, 2012

    Seedpelt

    *hears a rustle, and follows tye sound to a small pond, where a huge, plump rabbit is sitting. She pounces and brings the rabbit back to her clan*

    0 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 7, 2012

    I am a Tiger Fan one of the biggest fans. He has done more for g

    I am a Tiger Fan one of the biggest fans. He has done more for golf than any other person I have seen. This book like many others is written for one purpose only money. With that being said it's just like buying the book written about President Kennedy 50 year ago mistress distasteful. This man got paid off of Tiger Woods he can not be trusted.

    0 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 23, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 1, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 28, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 4, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 8, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 1, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 49 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)