The Book of Five Rings - Go Rin no Sho by Miyamoto Musashi | NOOK Book (eBook) | Barnes & Noble
The Book of Five Rings:

The Book of Five Rings: "Go Rin No Sho"

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by Miyamoto Musashi
     
 

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The Book of Five Rings is a famous text written by the swordsman Miyamoto Musashi in 1645, concerning Martial Arts, in particular Kenjitsu and the art of Zen.

Miyamoto Musashi uses language that is as sharp and decisive as his sword - delivering in unfaltering steps the most direct path towards the objective - to cut down your opponent and emerge unscathed

Overview

The Book of Five Rings is a famous text written by the swordsman Miyamoto Musashi in 1645, concerning Martial Arts, in particular Kenjitsu and the art of Zen.

Miyamoto Musashi uses language that is as sharp and decisive as his sword - delivering in unfaltering steps the most direct path towards the objective - to cut down your opponent and emerge unscathed and victorious.

As with many books of this ilk - like "The Art of War" by Sun Tzu or Machiavelli - the precepts are largely applicable to every form of human competition, and have been widely transferred into the worlds of business and sport in the modern era.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940148341277
Publisher:
Bybliotech
Publication date:
02/12/2014
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
4 MB

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The Book of Five Rings - Go Rin no Sho 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 39 reviews.
TOverton More than 1 year ago
I understand why this title is placed as a biography/history but believe me there could be no better place than among business listings. No, I have not added this to my nook, having only just purchased the color nook this week, but for 99 cents, it is a must for many business owners. The book itself contains much graphic writing about fighting strategy. Do not try any of this at home or anywhere for that matter. Use the psychology in the business sense. Musashi was a Samurai centuries ago in Japan. It was a different time and culture where survival meant focusing and using all possible senses were necesary. How this applies to todays business world will seem apparent when read. But some of the contents need reading several times to internally grasp it's application for your condition and how to apply in your business setting. I purchased my hardcover in the year 1977 when told by a friend that many Japanese businessmen keep a copy on their desk. Alot of business is like warfare. Successful strategies in business require your sharpest tools best used. Businessmen with e-readers couldn't hurt to have a copy of this on their tablet. I certainly will.
JohnP51 More than 1 year ago
Myamoto Musashi is considered the greatest swordsman to have ever lived and his writings are considered the Japanese equivalent of Sun Tzu's The Art of War. Albeit brief by comparison with Sun Tzu's work, it is no less powerful. Do not speed read through this. Study each and every sentence carefully.
TrojanSkyCop More than 1 year ago
NOTE: My review pertains to the paperback edition edited and translated by Thomas F. Cleary....... One of the all-time great books on warrior mindset as well as formulae for success in life in general. However, I rate it in less than 5 stars as I have some nitpicks about the accuracy of the translations, especially the use of feet and inches as units of measurement in 17th century Japan (unless the translator and editor, Mr. Thomas Cleary, simply converted the numbers from whatever unit of measurement Musashi-san originally used, in order to facilitate the Western reader's ease of understanding). Random stream-of-consciousness notes I took are as follows.... --pp. 54-55: "Crossing a ford" appears to be worded differently from the translation that Gabe Suarez quoted. --pp. 58-59: "Becoming the Opponent." Ah yes, think like the enemy. --p. 59: "Letting Go Four Hands": another way of saying "think outside the box?" --p. 60: "Moving Shadows": would Gen. Schwarzkopf's fake amphibious assault during Desert Storm be an example? --p. 61: "One entrancing mood is boredom." Indeed it is. --p. 65: "Three Shouts = LET ME HEAR YOUR WAR CRY!! --p. 68: "Knocking the Heart Out," i.e. destroy their morale --------------------------- --p. 73: using "inch" as a standard of measurement in 17th century Japan? --pp. 74-75: "For those who prefer extra-long swords, they have their own reason, but it is logical for themselves alone; from the point of view of the real Way of the world, it is illogical....Is a battle between a small contingent and a large contingent impossible? There are many examples of a small contingent winning over a large contingent." --p. 76: "When it comes to winning victory in everything, it is impossible to prevail without reason....To think of winning by means of a longer short sword alone is not the true Way. Since ancient times long and short swords have been distinguished in terminology." --p. 78: "In my military science, it is essential that the physical and the mental state both be simple and direct..." --p. 79: "In the course of struggle by military science, the thing is to concentrate on seizing the initiative and getting the jump on others in everything." Like USAF Col. John Boyd's OODA Loop! --p. 81: "Generally speaking, the focus of the eyes in martial arts is on the hearts and minds of the people involved." --p. 84: "Speed is particularly bad in the context of the science of martial arts." Say WHAT?!?! Is this a mistranslation?? By "speed" did he actually mean "haste?" In modern day warfare, speed is a must!!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Like many good books from China and Japan it a book that grasp not just content but the spirit of everything that can be applied to it. Its the kind of book that you highlight make your own personal notes then keep it as a reference.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great book and interesting read for historical and current relevance.
seagem More than 1 year ago
Although I have read better translations of this book it's still a classic. You don't need to be a martial artist, a swordsman or even a business person to appreciate it. Unlike Sun Tzu which tells you how to fight like a warrior, The Book of Five Rings teaches you about the state of mind a warrior needs to be successful. These timeless principles can be applied to every underlying level of human interaction. A great read for all!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I've had a copy of this book for decades and enjoy reading it again from time to time. I have studied martial arts since I was a child, lived in Japan for four years, and am now a career military officer. It remains on my bookshelf and now in my Nook. This version has occasional formatting issues on my Nook - mostly lost spaces between paragraphs and the like, hence the lost star - but is very readable. The translation works and doesn't have some of the cumbersome phrases that can burden any book translated from one language to another. All in all, I'm glad to have it and find myself returning to it from time to time in idle moments... just the reason I got it in the first place.
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