The Book of Jewish Sacred Practices: CLAL's Guide to Everyday & Holiday Rituals & Blessings

Overview

Discover how to make virtually any moment in your day a significant part of a meaningful Jewish life.

As we have discovered, and as our sages have long known, there is no experience in the life of a Jew that cannot be marked in Jewish ways…. The book you hold in your hands is the result of the kinds of rituals we have sculpted together over the years. It is not a prayer book or even a compendium of obligatory ...

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The Book of Jewish Sacred Practices: CLAL's Guide to Everyday & Holiday Rituals & Blessings

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Overview

Discover how to make virtually any moment in your day a significant part of a meaningful Jewish life.

As we have discovered, and as our sages have long known, there is no experience in the life of a Jew that cannot be marked in Jewish ways…. The book you hold in your hands is the result of the kinds of rituals we have sculpted together over the years. It is not a prayer book or even a compendium of obligatory Jewish rituals. Rather, it is a source for all to use creatively.
—from the Introduction

Decades of experience by CLAL—The National Jewish Center for Learning and Leadership in connecting spirituality with daily life come together in this one comprehensive handbook. In these pages, you have access to teachings that can help to sanctify almost any moment in your day.

Offering a meditation, a blessing, a profound Jewish teaching, and a ritual for more than one hundred diverse everyday events and holidays, this guide includes sacred practices for:

  • Lighting Shabbat candles
  • Blessing your parents
  • Running a marathon
  • Visiting the sick
  • Building a sukkah
  • Seeing natural wonders
  • Moving into a new home
  • Saying goodbye to a beloved pet
  • Making a shiva call
  • Traveling ... and much more

Drawing from both traditional and contemporary sources, The Book of Jewish Sacred Practices will show you how to make more holy any moment in your daily life.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"A totally original and deeply needed book... Takes you by the hand and shows you how to make every important moment of your life holy."
Rabbi Joseph Telushkin, author of Jewish Literacy and The Book of Jewish Values

"Provides a refreshing and innovative path into Jewish life and ritual. Its format is easily accessible and will inspire both new learners and those who are more knowledgeable about Judaism."
Rabbi Lori Forman, director of the Jewish Resource Center, UJA–Federation of New York; co-author of Sacred Intentions: Daily Inspiration to Strengthen the Spirit, Based on Jewish Wisdom

“Clal's important work provides sensitive and innovative ways to help us find greater Jewish meaning in many moments in our life.”
Rabbi Elyse Goldstein, editor of The Women's Haftarah Commentary: New Insights from Women Rabbis on the 54 Weekly Haftarah Portions, the 5 Megillot & Special Shabbatot

“An extraordinary guide for elevating the everyday activities of our lives into spiritual moments! An essential volume for the Jewish home.”
Dr. Ron Wolfson, vice president of the University of Judaism; author of Hanukkah: The Family Guide to Spiritual Celebration and The Art of Jewish Living series

Publishers Weekly
Readers who want to create significance out of ordinary as well as remarkable moments will find an invaluable resource in this guidebook from CLAL the National Jewish Center for Learning and Leadership. There's a ritual to mark almost every possible occasion, from the mundane (making a list of things to do) to the sublime (falling in love). Organizing a room becomes a symbolic act of repair, of bringing order to a chaotic world. Quitting smoking, running a marathon, honoring a teacher, sending a child to college, mourning a pet these experiences that until now have not been addressed by Jewish tradition receive a new sanctity as they serve as potential "tools for awakening and self-transformation." The contributing rabbis and scholars from every denomination of Judaism also try to renew rituals that may have become routine, like lighting Sabbath candles or cleaning the house for Passover. "What we get from each moment ultimately depends on the attention (kavanah) we give to those moments," writes rabbi and editor Kula, CLAL's president. More than 100 occasions are classified into 11 sections: everyday life; parents and children; relationships; special moments; healing; life and death; learning; leadership and communal life; Israel; tzedakah; and holy days. Each event includes a meditation, a ritual, blessings and teachings drawn from biblical or rabbinic texts. This traditional Jewish framework should appeal to Jewish readers; non-Jewish readers may also enjoy the inclusive and thought-provoking approach, which does not require giving up or adopting new religious beliefs. (Dec.) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Children's Literature
CLAL is the National Jewish Center for Learning and Leadership, an educational agency that promotes the integration of Jewish knowledge and practice into contemporary American life. This interesting guidebook is an example of a successful interpolation of traditional Jewish practices into everyday activities. Judaism attempts to make all human activity sacred, no matter how humble, since the world and everything in it is a gift from God. There are specific blessings for eating, traveling, waking up, going to sleep, even ordinary bodily functions. This book now extends that idea to modern phenomenon such as beginning to exercise, quitting smoking, writing an ethical will and moving into a new house. Each activity has a meditation and a ritual associated with it, along with a blessing, and one or more "teachings," or texts to study and discuss. The Hebrew blessings are transliterated and translated. The blessing before running a marathon, for instance, is "You abound in blessings, preparing a person's steps." The meditation is Psalm 118, and the teaching is also from Psalms--"Bless God, celebrate God's praises, who has given us life and has not let our feet slip." A good addition for libraries with spirituality or religion collections. 2001, Jewish Lights Publishing, $18.95. Ages 12 up. Reviewer: Miriam Rinn
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781580231527
  • Publisher: Jewish Lights Publishing
  • Publication date: 10/1/2001
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 368
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.82 (d)

Meet the Author

Vanessa L. Ochs is the Ida and Nathan Kolodiz Director of Jewish Studies and associate professor of religious studies at the University of Virginia. A recipient of a fellowship in creative writing from the National Endowment of the Arts, she is author of several books, coauthor of The Jewish Dream Book: The Key to Opening the Inner Meaning of Your Dreams, and co-editor, with Rabbi Irwin Kula, of The Book of Jewish Sacred Practices: CLAL's Guide to Everyday & Holiday Rituals & Blessings (both Jewish Lights).

Vanessa L. Ochs is available to speak on the following topics:

  • Jewish Ritual Innovation
  • Haggadah
  • Jewish Feminism
  • What Makes a Jewish Home Jewish
  • Raising Kids with Jewish Values

Rabbi Irwin Kula is president of CLAL—The National Jewish Center for Learning and Leadership, a leading voice for religious pluralism in the Jewish community. A sought-after speaker, he was named by the PBS program Religion & Ethics Newsweekly as one of the "10 People to Watch" helping to shape the American spiritual landscape. Fast Company magazine listed him as one of the seventeen new economy leaders, and Forward newspaper named him one of the top fifty Jewish leaders in America. He received his rabbinic ordination from The Jewish Theological Seminary of America.

Rabbi Tsvi Blanchard, PhD, is Director of Organizational Development at CLAL. He was ordained at the St. Louis Rabbinical College and received his
Ph.D. in Psychology from St. Louis University and his Ph.D. in Philosophy from Washington University.

Rabbi Daniel Silberman Brenner is a Senior Teaching Fellow at CLAL. He received his M.A. in Hebrew Letters and his ordination from the Reconstructionist Rabbinical College.

Shari Cohen, PhD, is a Senior Fellow at CLAL. She received her PhD in Political Science from the University of California, Berkeley.

Shari Cohen, PhD, is a Senior Fellow at CLAL. She received her Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of California, Berkeley.

Rabbi Niles E. Goldstein, formerly a CLAL Steinhardt Senior Fellow, received his M.A. from and was ordained at Hebrew Union College.

Michael Gottsegen, PhD, is Director of Internet Programs at CLAL. He received his PhD in Political Theory from Columbia University and is completing his PhD in Religion at Harvard University.

Rabbi Irving (Yitz) Greenberg, PhD, is President Emeritus and co-founder of CLAL. He received ordination from Beth Joseph Rabbinical Seminary and his PhD in History from Harvard University.

Rabbi Steven Greenberg is a Senior Teaching Fellow at CLAL. He received his rabbinical ordination from Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary of
Yeshiva University.

Rabbi Brad Hirschfield is Director of Leadership and Communities at CLAL. He received ordination from the Institute of Traditional Judaism and his M.A. and M.Phil. in Ancient Jewish History from the Jewish Theological Seminary.

Janet R. Kirchheimer is Director of Community Development and Assistant to the President of CLAL. She received her B.S. in Business Administration from Central Connecticut State College.

David Kraemer, PhD, is a CLAL Associate. He received his M.A. and PhD in Talmud and Rabbinics from the Jewish Theological Seminary.

Rabbi Jennifer E. Krause is a CLAL Associate. She received her M.A. in Hebrew Literature from and was ordained at Hebrew Union College.

Rabbi Benay Lappe was a CLAL Spielberg Fellow and is a CLAL Associate. She received an M.A. in Rabbinic Literature and ordination from the Jewish Theological Seminary.

Rabbi Natan Margalit, PhD, is the director of the Oraita Institute for Continuing Rabbinic Education of Hebrew College, and assistant professor of rabbinics at Hebrew College. His writings on rabbinic literature and on Judaism and the environment have appeared in several academic and popular journals.

Rabbi David Nelson, PhD, is a Senior CLAL Associate. He received his ordination from Hebrew Union College and his Ph.D. in Midrash from New York University.

Rabbi Rachel T. Sabath is a CLAL Associate. She was ordained at Hebrew Union College. She is completing a Ph.D. in Jewish Philosophy from the Jewish Theological Seminary.

Robert Rabinowitz, PhD, is a Senior Fellow at CLAL. He received his PhD in Philosophy from London University.

Andrew Silow-Carroll was a CLAL Spielberg Fellow. He received his B.A. in English from the State University of New York at Albany.

Rabbi Lawrence Troster was a CLAL Steinhardt Fellow. He received his M.A. and his rabbinic ordination from the Jewish Theological Seminary.

Rabbi Judith Z. Abrams, PhD, an award-winning Jewish educator, is widely recognized for making the study of Judaism and its sacred texts accessible and relevant to our everyday lives. She is the founder and director of Maqom: A School for Adult Talmud Study (www.maqom.com) and a recipient of the Covenant Award for outstanding performance in the field of Jewish education. She teaches through the ALEPH rabbinic program and is author of Learn Talmud and Talmud for Beginners, among other books about Talmud and prayer. She is a popular speaker on the topics of Jewish learning and sacred literature.

Rabbi Irwin Kula is president of CLAL—The National Jewish Center for Learning and Leadership, a leading voice for religious pluralism in the Jewish community. A sought-after speaker, he was named by the PBS program Religion & Ethics Newsweekly as one of the "10 People to Watch" helping to shape the American spiritual landscape. Fast Company magazine listed him as one of the seventeen new economy leaders, and Forward newspaper named him one of the top fifty Jewish leaders in America. He received his rabbinic ordination from The Jewish Theological Seminary of America.

Vanessa L. Ochs is the Ida and Nathan Kolodiz Director of Jewish Studies and associate professor of religious studies at the University of Virginia. A recipient of a fellowship in creative writing from the National Endowment of the Arts, she is author of several books, coauthor of The Jewish Dream Book: The Key to Opening the Inner Meaning of Your Dreams, and co-editor, with Rabbi Irwin Kula, of The Book of Jewish Sacred Practices: CLAL's Guide to Everyday & Holiday Rituals & Blessings (both Jewish Lights).

Vanessa L. Ochs is available to speak on the following topics:

  • Jewish Ritual Innovation
  • Haggadah
  • Jewish Feminism
  • What Makes a Jewish Home Jewish
  • Raising Kids with Jewish Values
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Read an Excerpt



Chapter One


EVERYDAY LIFE


WAKING UP


As soon as I sit up in bed and see
the light through the windows, I
am suddenly aware I'm alive and a
new day has begun. Then I say to
myself something like this:
"Thank you, God. I know You're
still out there
doing Your thing,
because here I am
again doing my
thing, thanks to
You." That's my
version of the
Modeh Ani prayer,
which appears in my siddur as: "I
render thanks unto Thee, everlasting
King, who has mercifully
restored my soul within me; Thy
faithfulness is beyond measure."
As I continue my morning ritual, I
do my own riffs on the traditional
morning prayers. As I put on
my glasses, I say: "Whoa! I can
see again!" for "Blessed art
Thou ... who openest the eyes
of the blind." As
I pull my body
out of bed: "I'm
standing on my
feet. Thank You!"
for "Blessed art
Thou ... who raisest
up those who
are bowed down." As I dress:
"Clean, fresh clothes!" for
"Blessed art Thou ... who clothest
the naked."


Meditation
[HEBREW TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]
Modeh ani l'fanekha.


Thank You, God, for waking me up and giving
me another day.


Ritual


After waking and saying your own version of Modeh
Ani
, pause, even if it's only for a few seconds, to register:
it really is a miracle to be alive for this new day! It
doesn't really matter what language you use, or whether
you say it out loud or to yourself. Just stop and notice:
I'm awake, I can see, I'm getting up, I'm washing, I'm
dressing. Be aware of the feelings that come as you make
these observations. It is these feelings that generated the
traditional prayers in the first place.


Blessing


With every part of my being I praise the One who is clothed
in splendor and majesty, wrapped in light as in a garment,
unfolding the heavens like a curtain.


Teaching


How long will you lie there, lazybones? When will
you wake from your sleep? A bit more sleep, a bit
more slumber, a bit more hugging yourself in bed.
(Proverbs 6:9-10)


This assignment originated from the Baal Shem
Tov's advice that every Jew should make 100 blessings
a day. Did they have to be in Hebrew? Did
they have to be only for Jewish things? I explained
to the class that the idea of the homework was to
notice all the ways in which their lives were blessed
and that making 100 blessings would be so challenging
that they would not have any energy to
notice anything but blessing.
(Johanna J. Singer, "100 Blessings a Day," in Traditions by
Sarah Shendehnan and Avram Davis)


PRAYING FOR WHAT WE NEED


In theory, praying for what we
need should be easy. Who knows
better what we
need than we do?
However, we wonder:
is it okay to
ask for the very
private things
that are important
to us? Should
we be distinguishing between
what we want and what we need?
And we may wonder:
if we ask for
what we need and
are answered positively,
what are
we bound to do
in return?


[HEBREW TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]
Barukh atah she'asah
li kol tzorki
Blessed is the One who
provides for all my needs


Meditation
A Prayer for What I Need


    We used to pray for wine, flour, oil.

We knew the deal:
We pleased You, and asked for the things,
  we needed.
We expected You would come through.
I still need wine, flour, and oil,
But I do not ask for them.
(The market is just down the street.)
This does not mean You are off the hook.
As I see it, the deal stands:
My coming through,
My asking for what I cannot get alone.
These are the staples:
Love, health, work, protection.
And this is what I need now: __________________.
I need to have the courage to call out to You
when I am in need.
I need You to be ready to hear me.


    [HEBREW TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]

Min ha'meitzar karati Yah, anani
va'merchav Yah.


  I have called You from tight places,
You answered me with expansiveness.


Ritual


As you begin each day, either during the traditional
Amidah prayer or, perhaps, as you wait for your coffee,
set aside a fixed time to focus upon what you need that
you cannot achieve or acquire on your own. Then ask,
"Please, God, this is what I need now: ______________."


Blessing


(After you have prayed for what you need)


[HEBREW TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]
Va'ani t'filati l'kha Adonai ayt ratzon, elohim b'rov
chasdekha, aneini.


Hear my prayer now, and in Your compassionate ways,
please answer me.


[HEBREW TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]
Barukh atah she'asah li kol tzorki.
Blessed is the One who provides for all my needs.


[HEBREW TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]
Barukh atah shomei'a t'filah.
Blessed is the One who hears my prayer.


Teaching
[HEBREW TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]
Karov Adonai l'khol kor'av.
God is close to all who call out.
(Ashrei)


According to R. Eliezer: If people pray only according
to the exact text of the prayer and add nothing
from their own minds, the prayer is not complete.
(Babylonian Talmud: Mishnah Brakhot 4:4)


WASHING OUR HANDS


Hand washing separates us from
what came before and prepares us
for what's to come;
it symbolizes our
becoming conscious
of what we
do and who we
are. The most familiar
time for the
ritual washing of
hands is before meals, but there
are other traditional times for special
hand washing
rituals. These
include waking up
in the morning
and returning
home from a cemetery.


[HEBREW TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]
Al netilat yadayim
Upon washing our hands


Meditation


Source of Blessing, may the washing of my hands
cleanse me and direct my hands to doing deeds of
righteousness.


Ritual


First, you may wish to remove any rings you are wearing.
Then take a cup (preferably one with two handles)
and fill it with water. With your left hand, hold the
cup and pour three times over your right hand. Switch
hands, repeat, lift up your hands, and then say the
blessing.


Blessing
[HEBREW TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]
Barukh atah Adonai eloheinu melekh ha'olam, asher
kidshanu b'mitzvotav v'tzivanu al netilat yadayim.


Blessed are You, Lord our God, whose mitzvot make our lives holy
and who gives us the mitzvah of washing our hands.


Teaching


Tradition specifies that for ritual washing, the water
be poured over the hands by human agency, not by
machine or faucet. The point is that awakening consciousness
cannot be accomplished by mechanical
means. Usually you pour water on your own hands
(on the right hand first), but pouring can also be
done by someone else as a mark of love or friendship.
It is also customary to be silent from the
moment of washing until the challah is broken and
eaten. The mind is concentrated, and consciousness
focuses on the bread and the meal to follow.
(Irving [Yitz] Greenberg, The Jewish Way)


EATING


The Rabbis of the Talmud once
said different blessings for
each kind of food. For delicacies,
our rabbis said:
"Blessed are You
who created all
kinds of delicacies
for delight."
For meats and
eggs, they said:
"Blessed are You
who created life
to give life." For
bread: "Blessed
are You who
brings out bread
from the earth." While some rabbis
taught that only the proper "formula"
could be recited over
specific foods, others took a more
pragmatic view,
saying, "If you
were to see a loaf
of bread and say,
`What a fine loaf
this is! Blessed is
the Holy One
who created it!'
you would have
fulfilled your obligation
to bless"
(Babylonian
Talmud: Brakhot 6).


[HEBREW TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]
Barukh ... she'ha'kol
n'hi'yeh b'dvaro
Blessed are You ... whose
word calls all things
into being


Meditation


When I sit down at the table, the Divine Presence
stands behind me. When I say a blessing, the Divine
Presence pushes forward to receive my words.
(Adapted from Zohar IV:186b)


Ritual


Before you are about to eat, pause just long enough to
compose a blessing that recognizes the specific food that
you are about to enjoy. As an example, our rabbis offer
the blessing of a simple shepherd named Benjamin who
made a sandwich and said, "Brikh rachamana marai d'hai
pita
." "Blessed be the Master of this bread."
(Babylonian Talmud: Brakhot 40b)


Blessing


[HEBREW TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]
Barukh ... she'ha'kol n'hi'yeh b'dvaro.
Blessed are You ... whose word calls all things into being. (Offer the
traditional blessing for specific foods, or add your own blessing to
heighten your awareness of the source of your food.
)


Teaching


Rabbi Yosi the Elder would not have his meal
cooked until he prayed to God for sustenance.
Then he waited a moment. Then he would say,
"Now that the Sovereign has sent sustenance,
let us prepare it."
(Zohar 11:62b)


When you have eaten and you are satisfied,
bless God for the good earth that has been
entrusted to you.
(Deuteronomy 8:10)


                   Let us take time to bless that which gives us life—sweet
                   as the fruit from Eden's tree, filling as Sarah's
                   cakes, savory as Jacob's stew, plentiful as the
                   manna in the wilderness, liberating as the crunchy
                   matzah, fresh as the first harvest brought to the
Temple, heavenly as the taste of the World to Come
in the Shabbat challah.
(CLAL Faculty)


MAKING A LIST OF THINGS
TO DO


Each morning my father consults
his list of things to do, which is
numbered clearly and prioritized
on a long yellow
pad. "Buy milk
and shredded
wheat" may be
number one, or
"Exercise bike at
the JCC." Some
days, other important
items appear, such as
doctors' appointments, anniversaries,
birthdays, shiva calls, and
preparations for
holidays and vacations.
One thing
is for sure: If it
isn't on the list, it
probably will not
get done.


[HEBREW TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]
Talmud Torah k'neged
kulam
Study Torah, embracing
all of life


Meditation
To do:
Teach children Pray with intensity
Honor parents Make peace
Be where I am needed And, most of all,
Make study a priority Talmud Torah k'neged
Welcome guests kulam
.
Visit the sick Study Torah:
Help those who are The embrace of all life,
   starting out Leading to all that we
Honor the dead value.


Ritual


Imagine beginning your day by writing out a sacred "to
do" list, reminding you that opportunities to perform
life's holiest tasks are not beyond you, not "in the heavens,"
but are right here in your daily encounters with
family, friends, and strangers. What if you made your
own "to do" list and noted the deeper dimensions and
ethical implications presented by your own tasks—buying
groceries, calling a lonely friend, repairing the
car, paying bills, going for a checkup? Start out with
the traditional sacred "to do" list. Then add the
specific tasks you must perform this day, each a
sacred opportunity.


Blessing
(When you have completed writing your list)


[HEBREW NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]
Eitz chaim hi la'machazikim bah.
Torah is a tree of life, embracing us as we embrace it.
Blessed are You who sanctifies us with mitzvot and commands us
to make Torah concrete in our lives.


Teaching


Rabbi Yose said: "Apply yourself to study Torah, for
it is not yours by inheritance, and let all your deeds
be in the name of heaven."

    (Pirkei Avot 2:17)


[HEBREW NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]
Dor l'dor y'shabach ma'asekha,
u'gvurotekha yagidu.
Every generation will praise Your works to the next
and will speak of Your powerful deeds.
(Ashrei)
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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments viii
About the Contributors ix
Preface xi
Introduction: Renew the Old, Sanctify the New 1

EVERYDAY LIFE
Waking Up 8
Praying for What We Need 10
Washing Our Hands 14
Eating 16
Making a List of Things to Do 18
Preparing a Family Recipe 22
Going to Work 24
Organizing Your Room, Your House, Your
Office, Your Affairs, Your Life 28
Traveling 30
Keeping a Sense of Home When You Are on the Road 32
Spending Time with Family 34
Having Guests of Different Faiths at Our Table 38
Bringing Home a New Pet 40
Gardening 42

PARENTS AND CHILDREN
Hoping to Have a Child 46
Celebrating Pregnancy 50
Welcoming a New Child 54
Nursing 58
Guiding Our Growing Children toward Independence 60
Preparing for Your Bar or Bat Mitzvah 62
Sending a Child to College 66
Blessing One's Parents 68

RELATIONSHIPS
Falling in Love 72
Celebrating the Difference You've Made in Each Other’s Lives 74
Ending a Relationship 78
Healing Relationships 82
Receiving Guests 86
Blessing One’s Hosts 90

SPECIAL MOMENTS
Celebrating a Private Miracle 94
Celebrating Birthdays 96
Hearing Good News 98
Being a Guest at a Wedding 100
Seeing Natural Wonders 102
Standing at a Crossroads 106
Running a Marathon 110
Noticing a Change in the Seasons 114
Moving into a New House 118
Joining a Synagogue 122
Taking on a Jewish Name 126
Wearing a Tallit for the First Time 130
Retiring 132

HEALING
Praying for Healing 136
Visiting the Sick 138
Finding Hope in a Time of Illness 142
Treating a Patient 144
Starting to Work Out 148
Quitting Smoking 152
Creating Opportunities, Opening Doors 154

LIFE AND DEATH
Hearing of a Death 158
Making a Shiva Call 160
Remembering the Loss of Someone You Love 164
Moving Out of Mourning and Back into Life 168
Writing an Ethical Will 170
Saying Good-Bye to a Beloved Pet 172

LEARNING
Starting School 176
Beginning to Study Torah for the First Time 178
Studying Sacred Texts Each Day 182
Finishing an Important Book 186
Honoring a Teacher at the End of the Year 188

LEADERSHIP AND COMMUNAL LIFE
Building a Pluralist Jewish Community 192
Examining Ourselves as Leaders 196
Taking on New Responsibilities 200
Taking on a Volunteer Role 204
Holding a Meeting 208
Installing a New Communal Leader 210
Celebrating a New Community Building 214
Naming a Community 218
I

SRAEL
Going to Israel 222
Visiting Jerusalem 226
Sending Your Child to Israel 230
Returning from Israel 232

TZEDAKAH
Preparing Ourselves to Do Sacred Work 236
Donating Food and Clothing 240
Soliciting Support 242
Receiving Requests for Contributions 246
Making a Contribution 248
Dedicating a Wall or Plaque that Honors Donors 250
Wearing Your Commitments 254

HOLY DAYS
Shabbat 257
Lighting Shabbat Candles 258
Blessing Children on Shabbat 260
Rosh Hashanah 263
Changing Your Fate for the Coming Year 264
Preparing Your Prayers for the High Holidays 268
Casting Away Our Sins (Tashlikh) 272
Hearing the Shofar 276
Yom Kippur 279
Fasting 280
Sukkot 283
Building a Sukkah 284
Receiving Sukkah Guests 286
Waving the Lulav and Etrog 290
Taking Down a Sukkah 294
Simchat Torah 297
Dancing with the Torah 298
Chanukah 301
Lighting the Menorah 302
Rededicating Your Home on Chanukah 306
Purim 309
Preparing Mishloach Manot 310
Passover 313
Removing Chametz from One’s Home 314
Searching for the Afikoman (for Grown-Ups) 318
Counting the Omer 322
Yom Ha’atzma’ut 325
Celebrating Yom Ha’atzma’ut, Israel’s Independence Day 326
Shavuot 329
Studying Together on Shavuot 330
Rosh Chodesh 333
Celebrating Rosh Chodesh 334
About the Translations 337
About CLAL—The National Jewish Center for Learning and Leadership 338

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 11, 2001

    A must for the library of every spiritual seeker.

    This well organized book would be a great addition to the library of any person who wants to mark the important and the ordinary events of their lives with spiritual significance. Nearly every holiday, life cycle event and daily activity has its' own page with a blessing, a teaching and a ritual. You will love pulling it off your bookshelf when you are looking to add meaning to the magnificent or the seemingly mundane.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 11, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews

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