The Book of the Courtier

The Book of the Courtier

2.5 12
by Baldesar Castiglione, George Bull
     
 

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In The Book of the Courtier (1528), Baldesar Castiglione, a diplomat and Papal Nuncio to Rome, sets out to define the essential virtues for those at Court. In a lively series of imaginary conversations between the real-life courtiers to the Duke of Urbino, his speakers discuss qualities of noble behaviour - chiefly discretion, decorum, nonchalance and gracefulness -

Overview

In The Book of the Courtier (1528), Baldesar Castiglione, a diplomat and Papal Nuncio to Rome, sets out to define the essential virtues for those at Court. In a lively series of imaginary conversations between the real-life courtiers to the Duke of Urbino, his speakers discuss qualities of noble behaviour - chiefly discretion, decorum, nonchalance and gracefulness - as well as wider questions such as the duties of a good government and the true nature of love. Castiglione's narrative power and psychological perception make this guide both an entertaining comedy of manners and a revealing window onto the ideals and preoccupations of the Italian Renaissance at the moment of its greatest splendour.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780141916514
Publisher:
Penguin UK
Publication date:
04/29/2004
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
2 MB

Meet the Author

Castiglione was born in 1478 and a member of an ancient aristocratic family. A courtier throughout his life, his writings were always a secondary affair.

George Bull was an author and journlaist who translated six books for the Penguin Classics, including The Prince by Machiavelli. He was a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature and was made a Knight Commander in 1999.


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The Book of the Courtier 2.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 12 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
And Book of Five Rings - while many people would like to think of business as 'Mortal Combat' with dollars, the truth is that business is a royal court, with layers of ritual, obsequious flattery, and relationship management. For every real executive empowered to 'make the call' there are dozens of people who have only 'influence'. Castiglione virtually invents the science of how to influence those above you, and win over your peers with grace and wit. So let other people pop testosterone pills with their Lattes in the morning, thinking it will give them the 'killer edge' - you can learn to glide past them with an ease that astonishes.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Surprisingly liberal in it's approach, The Courtier purports to be four nights' discussion of the ideal courtier. The witty and subtle analysis yields some wonderful surprises -- for example, that the courtier should excel at everything, except chess. But the analysis is even more delightful than the conclusions reached. Nothing is left out. Discussions include how the courtier should conduct himself in combat, in society, with his betters, with his inferiors, and in love. It even discusses why one should be a courtier -- to be able to influence one's prince to make sound policy. The Courtier was very influential, coming out in over 100 editions in half a dozen languages within a century of its introduction. It's one of the best looks one can get at the Renaissance mind. I've studied this book in 3 modern English translations and one 17th century English translation, and this is the best of them.
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FARIEQUEENE More than 1 year ago
This is one of the google books that will not open upon downloading, try another copy.
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