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The Boy at the Gate: A Memoir
     

The Boy at the Gate: A Memoir

4.5 2
by Danny Ellis
 

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Danny Ellis is a survivor, strong and resilient. An acclaimed singer/songwriter, he is proud of the way  he handled his difficult past: poverty in the 1950s Dublin slums and the brutality of the Artane Industrial School. He felt as though he had safely disposed of it all, until one night, while writing the powerful song that would launch his highly-praised album,

Overview

Danny Ellis is a survivor, strong and resilient. An acclaimed singer/songwriter, he is proud of the way  he handled his difficult past: poverty in the 1950s Dublin slums and the brutality of the Artane Industrial School. He felt as though he had safely disposed of it all, until one night, while writing the powerful song that would launch his highly-praised album, 800 Voices ("A searing testament." —Irish Times), Danny's past crept back to haunt him. Confronted by forgotten memories of betrayal and abandonment, he was stunned to discover that his eight-year-old self was still trapped in a world he thought he had left behind.

Although unnerved by his experience, Danny begins an arduous journey that leads him back to the streets of Dublin, the tenement slums, and, ultimately, the malice and mischief of the Artane playground. What he discovers with each twist and turn of his odyssey will forever change his life. Elegantly written, this is a brutally honest, often harrowing, depiction of a young boy's struggle to survive orphanage life, and stands as an inspiring testament to the healing power of music and love.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

“This is an incredibly brave book: shocking, and sometimes, despite everything, shockingly hilarious.” —Sara Gruen, bestselling author of Water for Elephants

“Like a true song, this story is finely crafted workmanship, unashamedly human with its pain and perplexity, yet unabashedly divine with grace and light and love woven into the tapestry beneath the tweed. . . . It is a treasure!” —William Paul Young, author of The Shack

“[Danny Ellis] moves fluidly between present and past, exploring a hard early life and its aftereffects with a mischievous tone.”
Shelf Awareness

"A gifted writer, Ellis is effective at presenting abuse and neglect from the young boy’s perspective, without the elaboration of hindsight, the pathos of the memories only unraveling fully later. . . . Ellis is at his most poetic when writing about the power of music to protect and motivate him. . . . Filled with both winks and tears, this book proves that goodness can shine even in the ugliest places." —Booklist

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781628722949
Publisher:
Arcade Publishing
Publication date:
09/01/2013
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
384
Sales rank:
1,016,161
File size:
833 KB

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The Boy at the Gate 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
GrandpaGuy More than 1 year ago
Danny Ellis survived childhood in the infamous Irish orphanage called the Artane Industrial School. This book (The Boy at the Gate) is a memoir on how that experience shaped his life. We saw him in concert a week ago at a Sisters of St Francis event. His voice and song writing abilities are not to be missed. Listening to his CD (800 voices) while reading the story of loss, abandonment and redemption is an experience I won't forget soon.  In one sense, this is a horror story. An eight year old boy dropped off to be "cared for" by Catholic priests and eight hundred other boys. In another sense, it's a most beautiful story as Dano is saved by his innate talent and love for music. I couldn't put the book down, and now I'm sorry it's done.  As I write this note I'm listening to Dano sing. You need the book and the CD.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A powerful book full of grit. determination, suffering, and deliverance, Danny Ellis' memoir is also a spiritual journey, a look into and an understanding of the depth of his soul. Black Daniel and the Gas Man appear as symbols of toughness and fear, threads that run through his life, especially at the Artane Industrial School, His story is compelling and his writing is a joy to read. While punishments meted out at the school are unbelievably cruel, there is also compassion in the most unlikely places. And of course, as in any Irish story, there is humor. I especially recommend this to any musician out there who enjoys seeing how music has enhanced, and redeemed, another's life.