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The Boy Mechanic Makes Toys: 159 Games, Toys, Tricks, and Other Amusements

Overview

It’s vintage fun! This follow-up to The Boy Mechanic—Popular Mechanics’ collection of can-do ingenuity from the early 1900s—features more than 200 unique toys and games that anyone with a basic tool kit will want to make, plus the unusual and attractive rounded, flexibound format. Charmingly designed to capture that old-fashioned flavor, every imaginative project remains as engaging today as ever, with its appeal fully intact. There’s amusement for little kids, including a toy donkey that nods and wags its tail; ...
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Overview

It’s vintage fun! This follow-up to The Boy Mechanic—Popular Mechanics’ collection of can-do ingenuity from the early 1900s—features more than 200 unique toys and games that anyone with a basic tool kit will want to make, plus the unusual and attractive rounded, flexibound format. Charmingly designed to capture that old-fashioned flavor, every imaginative project remains as engaging today as ever, with its appeal fully intact. There’s amusement for little kids, including a toy donkey that nods and wags its tail; a child’s playhouse and a miniature windmill; magic tricks, such as an “X-Ray” pack of cards and mystery coin box; items for the great outdoors, which range from a homebuilt canoe to a diving tower; plus gizmos and gadgets, “scien-terrific” motors and engines, and entertaining objects for an older child to create and play with.
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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal

Take a trip down memory lane with this nostalgic meandering of projects gleaned from early 1900s Popular Mechanicsmagazine's pages. These projects and instructions may have been understood by Mr. Wizard but will not be by today's youth. None of the projects has been updated, and most should be supervised by an adult if attempted. Some are magic-trick and sleight-of-hand aides; others involve toys. Still others are highly mechanical or electrical in nature, not to mention completely impractical (however, the editors make no promises regarding feasibility or safety). Filled with quaint illustrations, this book is nothing more than historic fluff. Recommended only where there is demand.


—Karen Ellis
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781588166395
  • Publisher: Hearst
  • Publication date: 6/1/2007
  • Pages: 272
  • Sales rank: 940,493

Table of Contents


Foreword     7
Making Magic     9
The Science of Fun     42
The Really Great Outdoors     87
Fun for Little Ones     165
Fun for Older Kids     213
The Toy Workshop     260
Index     266
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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 15, 2007

    A reviewer

    It's always wonderful to see how it was 'way back when.' If you've ever seen 'The American Boys Handybook', or similar titles, you'll know what to expect. This book should be viewed as more of a glance into the past than an actual construction manual. Some of the information is poorly presented -- and in a way that could be dangerous to anyone trying to construct one of the projects. A glaring omission, early in the book, occurs on page 14 - the 'Wireless Lighted Lamp Deception.' The accompanying diagram has no relation whatsoever with the project or any other project in the book, so far as I can tell. Any boy attempting to construct this project would either wind up with a non-working project or a nasty shock, as the text presents insufficient details to actually make the project work. Overall, though, the projects are fascinating and I'll try a few - just not the light bulb trick!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 27, 2007

    Wireless Lighted Lamp Not Deception

    The Wireless lighted lamp is no deception. it is a science project that can be recreated just as easy as you turning on a radio and listening to the radio waves bombarding us day in and day out. why do solar pannels work... this is absouletly the kind of book that needs to be in the hands of our future leaders. teslasociety has a webpage about the man that came up with the idea of wireless lighted lamp. His name is Nikola Tesla and the idea that make it possible is the Tesla Coil.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 23, 2009

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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews

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