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The Boy's Book of Famous Warships
     

The Boy's Book of Famous Warships

by William Oliver Stevens
 
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This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
Chapter III THE REVENGE our next "famous ship" we will jump over nearly six centuries after the building of the Long Serpent. During all that time the Mediterranean war

Overview

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
Chapter III THE REVENGE our next "famous ship" we will jump over nearly six centuries after the building of the Long Serpent. During all that time the Mediterranean war vessel was still a galley. In 1571, for example, a great battle was fought between a Christian fleet and a Turkish fleet, the battle of Lepanto. In this action the ships engaged were long, low galleys, propelled by a row of oars on each side. They rushed into battle, bows on, and their crews fought at hand grips just as in the old days. In the Atlantic, however, warships had come to depend on canvas. Seventeen years after Lepanto an English fleet fought the Great Armada in the Channel. In this affair we see a new style of naval warfare, for nearly all the ships moved by sail alone and fought with artillery. And it is chiefly due to the fact that the English were so much better than the Spanish in seamanship and gunnery that the Armada was defeated. The heroine of the English fleet on that great occasion was the Revenge. She was a ship of forty guns, launchedin 1577, and given her name by Queen Elizabeth. The Queen named her ships, hi those days, to fit a special occasion. For example, the first Victory in the English navy she named to commemorate the defeat of Mary Stuart's plots, and the first Dreadnought was so called in defiant answer to the massacre of St. Bartholomew. The Revenge was Elizabeth's reply to the Spanish boast that they would overrun England and bring the heretic Queen to the block. We do not need to go into all the causes of the bad feeling between Englishmen and Spaniards at this time. Religious differences had something to do with it, but probably the chief trouble lay in the right to trade with the Spanish West Indies. Spain refused to permit any other nation to trade in her "Sp...

Product Details

BN ID:
2940026556731
Publisher:
R. M. McBride & company
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
330 KB

Read an Excerpt


Chapter III THE REVENGE our next "famous ship" we will jump over nearly six centuries after the building of the Long Serpent. During all that time the Mediterranean war vessel was still a galley. In 1571, for example, a great battle was fought between a Christian fleet and a Turkish fleet, the battle of Lepanto. In this action the ships engaged were long, low galleys, propelled by a row of oars on each side. They rushed into battle, bows on, and their crews fought at hand grips just as in the old days. In the Atlantic, however, warships had come to depend on canvas. Seventeen years after Lepanto an English fleet fought the Great Armada in the Channel. In this affair we see a new style of naval warfare, for nearly all the ships moved by sail alone and fought with artillery. And it is chiefly due to the fact that the English were so much better than the Spanish in seamanship and gunnery that the Armada was defeated. The heroine of the English fleet on that great occasion was the Revenge. She was a ship of forty guns, launchedin 1577, and given her name by Queen Elizabeth. The Queen named her ships, hi those days, to fit a special occasion. For example, the first Victory in the English navy she named to commemorate the defeat of Mary Stuart's plots, and the first Dreadnought was so called in defiant answer to the massacre of St. Bartholomew. The Revenge was Elizabeth's reply to the Spanish boast that they would overrun England and bring the heretic Queen to the block. We do not need to go into all the causes of the bad feeling between Englishmen and Spaniards at this time. Religious differences had something to do with it, but probably the chief trouble lay in the right to trade withthe Spanish West Indies. Spain refused to permit any other nation to trade in her "Sp...

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