The Brand Bubble: The Looming Crisis in Brand Value and How to Avoid It [NOOK Book]

Overview

How to use brands to gain and sustain competitive advantage

Companies today face a dilemma in marketing. The tried-and-true formulas to create sales and market share behind brands are becoming irrelevant and losing traction with consumers. In this book, Gerzema and LeBar offer credible evidence--drawn from a detailed analysis of a decade's worth of brand and financial data using Y&R's Brand Asset Valuator (BAV), the largest database of brands in the world--that business is ...

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The Brand Bubble: The Looming Crisis in Brand Value and How to Avoid It

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Overview

How to use brands to gain and sustain competitive advantage

Companies today face a dilemma in marketing. The tried-and-true formulas to create sales and market share behind brands are becoming irrelevant and losing traction with consumers. In this book, Gerzema and LeBar offer credible evidence--drawn from a detailed analysis of a decade's worth of brand and financial data using Y&R's Brand Asset Valuator (BAV), the largest database of brands in the world--that business is riding on yet another bubble that is ready to burst--a brand bubble. While most managers still see metrics like trust and awareness as the backbone of how brands are built, Gerzema asserts they're dead wrong--these metrics do not add to increased asset value. In fact, by following them, they actually hasten the declining value of their brands.

Using a five-stage model, The Brand Bubble reveals how today's successful brands--and tomorrow's--have an insatiable appetite for creativity and change. These brands offer consumers a palpable sense of movement and direction thanks to a powerful "energized differentiation." Gerzema reveals how brands with energized differentiation achieve better financial performance than traditional brands have. Plus, Gerzema helps readers develop energized differentiation in their own brands, creating consumer-centric and sustainable organizations.

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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal

These authors both hold senior positions at Young & Rubicam (Y&R), part of the largest ad agency holding company in the world, WPP Group. Their book sounds an alarm based on a gap in value between how consumers and investors perceive brands. The authors have a proprietary research tool that they use to measure value, and they've found that investors reward companies with greater brand awareness, even if consumers don't see much utility. The book presents recommendations on how to close the gap between consumer and company perceptions. Many other books present theories about branding. Al and Laura Ries's The 22 Immutable Laws of Branding offers a hands-on approach to branding, focusing on what works and not necessarily why, while Janelle Barlow and Paul Stewart's Branded Customer Service attacks the problem of branding from the view of the customer experience. David A. Aaker and Erich Joachimsthaler's Brand Leadership 's more quantitative approach and academic perspective can be compared most closely to this new book. The Brand Bubble is appropriate for a business school or corporate library and will be useful to marketers as well as investors.-Stephen E. Turner, Turner Devaughn Network, Abington, PA

From the Publisher
Selected One of the Best Marketing Books of 2009 by Strategy + Business

Voted to the BusinessWeek bestseller list, December 2008!

Voted Best Business Book of 2008, Advertising/Marketing —800-CEO-READ

Voted #6 Book You Should Have Read in 2008 —AdAge

"If consumer and investor perceptions of brand value have indeed been diverging, a huge reassessment of the value of brand-owning companies may still lie ahead"—Financial Times, October 23, 2008

"A wake-up call for marketers that think more branding per se will save them."—Harvard Business Review, November 2008

These authors both hold senior positions at Young & Rubicam (Y&R), part of the largest ad agency holding company in the world, WPP Group. Their book sounds an alarm based on a gap in value between how consumers and investors perceive brands. The authors have a proprietary research tool that they use to measure value, and they've found that investors reward companies with greater brand awareness, even if consumers don't see much utility. The book presents recommendations on how to close the gap between consumer and company perceptions. Many other books present theories about branding. Al and Laura Ries's The 22 Immutable Laws of Branding offers a hands-on approach to branding, focusing on what works and not necessarily why, while Janelle Barlow and Paul Stewart's Branded Customer Service attacks the problem of branding from the view of the customer experience. David A. Aaker and Erich Joachimsthaler's Brand Leadership's more quantitative approach and academic perspective can be compared most closely to this new book. The Brand Bubble is appropriate for a business school or corporate library and will be useful to marketers as well as investors.
—Stephen E. Turner, Turner Devaughn Network, Abington, PA (Library Journal, September 15, 2008)

"The authors have access to one of the richest longitudinal marketing databases in the world...If consumer and investor perceptions of brand value have indeed been diverging, a huge reassessment of the value of brand-owning companies may still be ahead."—Alan Mitchell, Financial Times (October 23, 2008)

"Through extensive consumer research and analysis, the authors propose a startling fact: that despite rising valuations, consumers are falling out of love with many of the brands they buy. Use this book to learn how to safeguard one of your most cherished assets, your brand."Ram Charan, co-author of The Game Changer, Execution, and Confronting Reality

"Essential reading for all concerned with the future of their brand." (LRP, April 2009)

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780470449394
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Publication date: 11/3/2008
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 272
  • File size: 3 MB

Meet the Author

John Gerzema is Chief Insights Officer for Young & Rubicam Group. One of the earliest founders of account planning in American advertising agencies, John has designed brand strategies for clients for almost twenty—fi ve years, guiding campaigns to international strategic and creative recognition that resulted in The One Show Best of Show award, numerous EFFIE’s and several gold lions from The Cannes Advertising Festival. Prior to joining Y & R, Gerzema oversaw the international network for Fallon, and founded offices in Tokyo, Singapore, Hong Kong, and Sâo Paulo. He holds a master’s degree in integrated marketing from the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University and a B.S. in marketing from The Ohio State University.

Ed Lebar is CEO of BrandAsset Consulting Group. Ed manages BrandAsset Consulting around the world. He has helped grow BrandAsset Valuator into the largest brand model and database in the world, which now includes input from over 500,000 customers on 38,000 brands across 48 countries through 250 studies.
Before his career in marketing and advertising, Lebar was a professor of economics at CCNY and Finch College. He holds advanced degrees in economics from NYU and the University of Denver, and a B.A. from Syracuse University.

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Table of Contents

Foreword By Peter Stringham, CEO, Young & Rubicam Group.

PART ONE: INTRODUCTION.

1 Tulipmania and Infl ated Brands.

2 Can You Say “Irresistible”?

3 Wall Street, Meet Main Street.

4 The Postmodern Craving for Creativity.

5 Welcome to ConsumerLand.

PART TWO: APPLICATION.

6 Stage One—Exploration: Performing an Energy Audit.

Case study: LEGO—Play Well.

7 Stage Two—Distillation: Identifying the Energy Core.

Case study: Virgin Atlantic—Brilliant Basics, Magic Touches.

8 Stage Three—Ignition: Creating an Energized Value Chain.

Case study: Xerox—The Energy Inside.

9 Stage Four—Fusion: Becoming an Energy-Driven Enterprise.

Case study: Mumbai Tiffi n Box Suppliers—Human Energy.

10 Stage Five—Renewal: Active Listening and Constant Refreshing of Brand Meaning.

Case study: UNIQLO—Seeing Farther.

Epilogue: A Brand May Be Famous, But Is It Creating Return for Shareholders?

Notes.

Acknowledgments.

The Authors.

Index.

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 27, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Important action for brand preservation

    John Gerzema and Ed Lebar have written an exceptionally clear, pertinent book about the declining value of brands and why the world¿s largest brand names are in flux. Using proprietary data, the authors vividly explain how brand clutter has created a marketing bubble. Since brands are such an important part of any corporation¿s value, the authors contend, the total valuation of this brand bubble will dwarf the mortgage bubble. The authors identify and analyze the branding problem, and then make recommendations about how to solve it. The book¿s one drawback is that it becomes repetitive, especially in the later sections. Still, the authors¿ timely, compelling argument should resonate with branding professionals. getAbstract recommends this book to marketers who want a better understanding of how lack of creativity makes brands deteriorate, and of how they might be able to resurrect the brands that are still salvageable.

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