The Bravo by James Fenimore Cooper [NOOK Book]

Overview

It is to be regretted the world does not discriminate more justly in its use of political terms. Governments are usually called either monarchies or republics. The former class embraces equally those institutions in which the sovereign is worshipped as a god, and those in which he performs the humble office of a manikin. In the latter we find aristocracies and democracies blended in the same generic appellation. The consequence of a generalization so wide is an utter confusion ...
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The Bravo by James Fenimore Cooper

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Overview

It is to be regretted the world does not discriminate more justly in its use of political terms. Governments are usually called either monarchies or republics. The former class embraces equally those institutions in which the sovereign is worshipped as a god, and those in which he performs the humble office of a manikin. In the latter we find aristocracies and democracies blended in the same generic appellation. The consequence of a generalization so wide is an utter confusion on the subject of the polity of states.
The author has endeavored to give his countrymen, in this book, a picture of the social system of one of the soi-disant republics of the other hemisphere. There has been no attempt to portray historical characters, only too fictitious in their graver dress, but simply to set forth the familiar operations of Venetian policy. For the justification of his likeness, after allowing for the defects of execution, he refers to the well-known work of M. Daru.
A history of the progress of political liberty, written purely in the interests of humanity, is still a desideratum in literature. In nations which have made a false commencement, it would be found that the citizen, or rather the subject, has extorted immunity after immunity, as his growing intelligence and importance have both instructed and required him to defend those particular rights which were necessary to his well-being. A certain accumulation of these immunities constitutes, with a solitary and recent exception in Switzerland, the essence of European liberty, even at this hour. It is scarcely necessary to tell the reader, that this freedom, be it more or less, depends on a principle entirely different from our own. Here the immunities do not proceed from, but they are granted to, the government, being, in other words, concessions of natural rights made by the people to the state, for the benefits of social protection. So long as this vital difference exists between ourselves and other nations, it will be vain to think of finding analogies in their institutions. It is true that, in an age like this, public opinion is itself a charter, and that the most despotic government which exists within the pale of Christendom, must, in some degree, respect its influence. The mildest and justest governments in Europe are, at this moment, theoretically despotisms. The characters of both prince and people enter largely into the consideration of so extraordinary results; and it should never be forgotten that, though the character of the latter be sufficiently secure, that of the former is liable to change. But, admitting every benefit which possibly can flow from a just administration, with wise and humane princes, a government which is not properly based on the people, possesses an unavoidable and oppressive evil of the first magnitude, in the necessity of supporting itself by physical force and onerous impositions, against the natural action of the majority.
Were we to characterize a republic, we should say it was a state in which power, both theoretically and practically, is derived from the nation, with a constant responsibility of the agents of the public to the people—a responsibility that is neither to be evaded nor denied. That such a system is better on a large than on a small scale, though contrary to brilliant theories which have been written to uphold different institutions, must be evident on the smallest reflection, since the danger of all popular governments is from popular mistakes; and a people of diversified interests and extended territorial possessions, are much less likely to be the subjects of sinister passions than the inhabitants of a single town or county. If to this definition we should add, as an infallible test of the genus, that a true republic is a government of which all others are jealous and vituperative, on the instinct of self-preservation, we believe there would be no mistaking the class. How far Venice would have been obnoxious to this proof, the reader is left to judge for himself.
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940014820714
  • Publisher: Syed Arshad Gillani
  • Publication date: 8/21/2012
  • Series: James Fenimore Cooper Books , #13
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • File size: 991 KB

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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 17, 2013

    Hi

    I am Firekit. I was abandoned as a kit and I need help. I can't live on my own! Which Clan can have me?

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 17, 2013

    Grasstail

    A brown cat with white patches and leaf green eyes padded up into the clearing. "May I join your clan?" Two kits came from behind the patched cat. One she kit was tan colored with hazel eyes the other tom kit was like his mother. Brown with patches and dark green eyes. "I have two kits" she flicked her white tipped ears to the tan she kit. "This is Brushkit" the mother purred then she flicked her ears to the other kit. "This is Leafkit." The mother said with her beatiful eyes shining. "I'm Grasstail. May we join your clan?"

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 17, 2013

    Autumnfall

    Autumnfall nodded. "Sure you can. Main camp is first result."

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 17, 2013

    Lightningfeather

    ((Kk, have fun at your carwash.)) She picked up the mouse and chaffinch she had caught, and padded back to the camp, motioning for the others to follow. ~*Lightningfeather

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