The Bread of Affliction: The Food Supply in the USSR during World War II / Edition 1

The Bread of Affliction: The Food Supply in the USSR during World War II / Edition 1

by William Moskoff
     
 

ISBN-10: 0521522838

ISBN-13: 9780521522830

Pub. Date: 08/08/2002

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

This book tells how the Soviet Union fed itself after the invasion by the Germans during World War II. The author argues that central planning became much less important in feeding the population, and civilians were thereby forced to become considerably more self reliant in feeding themselves. A rationing system was instituted soon after the war began, but quickly

Overview

This book tells how the Soviet Union fed itself after the invasion by the Germans during World War II. The author argues that central planning became much less important in feeding the population, and civilians were thereby forced to become considerably more self reliant in feeding themselves. A rationing system was instituted soon after the war began, but quickly became irrelevant because of the chronic food shortages. The breakdown in central supplies of food was accompanied by the diminished importance of the ruble, which in many places was replaced by bread and clothing as the medium of exchange. Although the Soviet army was given high precedence over civilians, the author also shows that the population living under German occupation was much worse off than were Soviet civilians living in the rear. In addition to extensive use of American and German archives from the war period, the author interviewed more than thirty Soviet emigrés who survived the war.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780521522830
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Publication date:
08/08/2002
Series:
Cambridge Russian, Soviet and Post-Soviet Studies Series, #76
Edition description:
FIRST
Pages:
276
Product dimensions:
5.98(w) x 8.98(h) x 0.63(d)

Table of Contents

Acknowledgement; Abbreviations; Introduction; 1. On the eve of the War; 2. The desperate months of 1941: invasion and evacuation; 3. The German Occupation; 4. Producing food for the Unoccupied USSR: the factors of production; 5. Local food sources; 6. The first priority: feeding the armed forces; 7. Feeding the cities and towns: civilian rationing; 8. White and Black Markets: the safety valve for civilian food supply; 9. Crime and privilege; 10. Death's dominion: the Siege of Leningrad; 11. The newly liberated areas: restoring the food supply; 12. The wages of hunger: direct and indirect consequences of wartime food shortages; Conclusion; Bibliography.

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