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The Breastfeeding Handbook: A Mother's Complete Guide to a Happy, Healthy and Well-Adjusted Baby
     

The Breastfeeding Handbook: A Mother's Complete Guide to a Happy, Healthy and Well-Adjusted Baby

by Amanda Blackwell
 
According to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) Policy Statement on Breastfeeding, women who don’t have health problems should exclusively breastfeed their infants for at least the first six months of life. The AAP suggests that women try to breastfeed for the first 12 months of life because of the benefits to both the mother and

Overview

According to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) Policy Statement on Breastfeeding, women who don’t have health problems should exclusively breastfeed their infants for at least the first six months of life. The AAP suggests that women try to breastfeed for the first 12 months of life because of the benefits to both the mother and baby.

Breastfeeding offers many benefits to the baby:

* Breast milk provides the right balance of nutrients to help an infant grow into a strong and healthy toddler.

* Breastfed infants, and those who are fed expressed breast milk, have fewer deaths during the first year and experience fewer illnesses than babies fed formula.

* Some of the nutrients in breast milk also help protect an infant against some common childhood illnesses and infections, such as diarrhea, middle ear infections, and certain lung infections.

* Some recent National Institute of Child Health and Development (NICHD)-supported research also suggests that breast milk contains important fatty acids (building blocks) that help an infant's brain develop. Two specific fatty acids, known as DHA and AA, may help increase infants’ cognitive skills. Many types of infant formulas available in the United States are fortified with DHA and AA, and all formula available for preterm infants is fortified with these fatty acids.

Breastfeeding also benefits the mother:

* In response to the baby's sucking, the mother's body releases a hormone that makes her uterus contract and get smaller.

* Many mothers also get emotional benefits from breastfeeding because of the closeness of this interaction with the baby and from the satisfaction of helping to nourish their babies.

* Some research suggest that mothers who breastfeed their babies have fewer episodes of post-delivery depression.

* There is evolving evidence to indicate that certain types of cancer (such as breast, uterus, and ovarian cancer) occur less often in mothers who have breastfed their babies.

Many societies and cultures also encourage mothers to breastfeed, which can offer support to a new mother.

Even though breastfeeding is a natural process, it's not always easy. Many health care providers suggest that women get lactation support to learn how to breastfeed and what is involved with breastfeeding. Many health centers, clinics, and hospitals have lactation support specialists, such as an Internationally Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC) or a Certified Lactation Counselor (CLC), on staff. Ask your health care provider for more information about getting help with breastfeeding.

Product Details

BN ID:
2940014429245
Publisher:
Digital Direct Ebooks
Publication date:
05/17/2012
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
437 KB

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