The Bridge [NOOK Book]

Overview

In present day China, and old woman's house sits opposite an ancient bridge. Not just any bridge--but a special one because it has always been known as a lucky bridge. In olden days it was said to walk over it during a marriage ceremony, or at the beginning of the new year, would bring the travelor luck. Because of it's reputation, over the years it has also become a popular place for young mother to abandon their children. What to some may seem cruel is in reality their final gift to their offspring--one last ...

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The Bridge

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Overview

In present day China, and old woman's house sits opposite an ancient bridge. Not just any bridge--but a special one because it has always been known as a lucky bridge. In olden days it was said to walk over it during a marriage ceremony, or at the beginning of the new year, would bring the travelor luck. Because of it's reputation, over the years it has also become a popular place for young mother to abandon their children. What to some may seem cruel is in reality their final gift to their offspring--one last chance to send them off to their new destinies with luck on their side.

Jing, an old woman, is the unoffical and sometimes reluctant guardian of the old bridge. When no one else will, Jing steps in to prevent the children from frostbite, abuse, and hunger, then she delivers them to the local orphanage.

This has been her routine for many years, but what does Jing do when the latest child, a blind boy, burrows deep into her heart?

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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940149427000
  • Publisher: Kay Bratt
  • Publication date: 11/5/2011
  • Sold by: Draft2Digital
  • Format: eBook
  • Sales rank: 4,602
  • File size: 540 KB

Meet the Author

Kay Bratt is a child advocate and author, residing near the base of Wacau Mountain, in the rolling hills of Georgia with her husband, daughter, dog, and cat. In addition to coordinating small projects for the children of China, Kay is an active volunteer for Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA). Kay lived in China for over four years and because of her experiences working with orphans, she strives to be the voice for children who cannot speak for themselves. If you would like to read more about the children she knew and loved in China, read her poignant memoir titled Silent Tears; A Journey of Hope in a Chinese Orphanage. Kay is also the author of Chasing China; A Daughter’s Quest for Truth and the Mei Li series, starting with Mei Li and The Wise Laoshi (Coming Dec 2011).
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 6 )
Rating Distribution

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(3)

4 Star

(2)

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(1)

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Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 8, 2014

    Great read

    Loved this book. Short but sweet. Will defenitely read more from this author.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 19, 2014

    Anonymous

    I fell in love with the characters in this story. I can not what to read the next story.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 17, 2014

    Good

    Good story. Wished it could've continued further.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 11, 2014

    It¿s Mother¿s Day here in the United States. Whether you celebra

    It’s Mother’s Day here in the United States. Whether you celebrate the holiday today or on another day on the calendar, this book expresses the true nature of motherhood.

    The book is a short story of approximately seventy pages that will grip you on many levels. Ms. Bratt has spent five years in China and bases her writing experiences on the time she spent there and the love she acquired for the country’s people. She quickly and deftly paints the scene in Suzhou, China, 2010, portraying the old woman named Jing who is now dependent on the generosity of her son for her own survival. Jing is grateful to be able to care for her grandson and cook the meals in exchange for food and shelter over her head. She collects old sweaters and uses scraps of wool to make scarves so that she can save enough money to prepare for her unmarried daughter Qian’s annual trip home for the New Year holidays.

    The reader soon senses her generosity of spirit and kindness. Jing notices a young five year old boy sitting on the bridge near her window and watches with sadness as his mother does not return for him. Jing takes him in for the night and realizes that he is blind. She resolves to take him by foot to the orphanage, where she is a familiar character. The reader learns that she has done this many times before. Feeling particularly sad about the vulnerability and susceptibility of this disabled five year old named Fei Fei, Jing is unable to forget him. When she makes a return trip to the orphanage, she finds that he has been neglected. The director agrees to place Fei Fei in her care as a foster parent for three years. Jing doubts she will be able to succeed in taking care of him until he is old enough to be trained properly in a school for blind children, but she knows his survival is dependent upon her. When Jing’s daughter Qian arrives for the holidays, circumstances take another dramatic turn.

    The reader learns how the concept of motherhood can change and transform us. Will Fei Fei face a life of misery or will the struggling old woman named Jing somehow succeed in rehabilitating this child who, like many other Chinese children, has been abandoned on the “Lucky Bridge?” I recommend this book to children age eight and up. The story is based on a character that the author met in China. All the characters are well developed; the author explores some very important societal issues as well as the culture of China. This book is a good multicultural addition to a classroom library and introduces children living in the Western hemisphere to Asian traditions.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 20, 2011

    A Must Read!

    An excellent short story - fiction but with a basis in fact. The author uses descriptive language which paints very vivid complete mental images. She also provides an insider's glimpse into interesting facets of life in China.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 11, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews

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