The Budapest House: A Life Re-Discovered

The Budapest House: A Life Re-Discovered

3.0 58
by Marcus Ferrar
     
 

A Hungarian Jew traumatised by the loss of half her family in Auschwitz returns to Budapest to retrace her roots. She discovers a dramatic personal history that enables her eventually to shed the burden of her past and move forward to a new life.
This is a true story of human beings caught up in the maelstrom of 20th century history – the Nazis, genocide,

Overview


A Hungarian Jew traumatised by the loss of half her family in Auschwitz returns to Budapest to retrace her roots. She discovers a dramatic personal history that enables her eventually to shed the burden of her past and move forward to a new life.
This is a true story of human beings caught up in the maelstrom of 20th century history – the Nazis, genocide, Cold War, dictatorship, and the struggle to make new lives after the fall of Communism.
Told with great sympathy and warmth, this well researched book brings history to life by recounting the experiences of ordinary men and women confronted with daunting challenges.


Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780957524545
Publisher:
Crux Publishing
Publication date:
08/23/2013
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Sales rank:
171,059
File size:
2 MB

Meet the Author

Marcus Ferrar is a former Reuters correspondent who covered Eastern Europe for 18 years and during the Cold War, living in East Berlin and Prague. He specialises in histories of people who faced moral dilemmas. For this book he conducted several interviews in Hungary. His previous books are ‘A Foot in Both Camps: A German Past for Better and for Worse’ and ‘Slovenia 1945: Memories of Death and Survival after World War II’. For more info on the author, please visit: marcusferrar.org

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The Budapest House: A Life Re-Discovered 3 out of 5 based on 4 ratings. 58 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is not a tired old story! It needs to be told and retold so that the brave souls who suffered these horrors are never forgotten.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Never understood the east European mindset before. Never knew the difference in outlook on the world. I think I will read the news in a different way now.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Read 8/22-8/27, ebook, non fiction memoir, 2014 read your freebies This is a first person account of a personal and collective history of Frances Pinter whose family fled the horror and destruction of Eastern Europe during the last century. It is also a history of the Maygar ( Hungarian) people and how they have coped either by embracing or disowning their past and their politics. Yes, it is personal. Yes, it is hindsight and refective/reflexive, but in a world where few first person accounts of this type of trama still exist, it is an important work. It also helped both Pinter and Farrar come to grips and learn to thrive with their personal baggage, beliefs and ideals colored with their family memories, dismays, horrors and triumphs. Frances Pinters's grandparents were an upper class Jewish family who survived the ebb and flow of life in pre war Hungary after the first goverment overthrow in the late 1800s. Prosperous merchant Imre Hirschenhauser bought into property in Budapest in 1937, much to his wife Lili's chagrin. Despite their eventual collapse after which they emmigrated to the US, Imre kept his stake in Budapest House, and in doing so kept his history and hopes alive. Frances knew of the property, but had no idea what doors it might open as she sets out to find her past after she finds out the Jewish "secret" in her family past. Even within the Hungarian Jewish community, there was great division and anamosity. Those who became " Maygar" and fit in seamlessly vs. those who kept to their "own". Jewish children were baptized Christian (read Catholic). Others names were adapted to sound more Hungarian. Farrar even tell that a bishop in the RC Church was found to have been born Jewish. It might have divided families, but it kept them from being slaughtered. This book collaboration happened serendipitously when Reuters reporter met publisher Pinter and they decided to explore the rebuilding of Hungary post World Wars and now within the EU. Frances' family history is explored in great detail. First person edification of trauma and triumph color very dry historical data. However, Frances' own struggles with the politics that have developed is a good balance: here is the situation, here is the historical context, resulting in whether or not it can happen now. This journey is extrodinary, and proves that someone can move beyond the story and embrace truth. Well worth reading
vanlyle More than 1 year ago
I learned a lot about what it was like to be Jewish in Hungary in the 20th century etc. even if you survived the concentration camps, or didn't go there. This book gave a good sense of what it was like in the aftermath of that WWII as well. The story did not really have an ending per se, but gave a great feel for the times and place.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Appreciated the honesty and clarity of what was shared. Helps to complete one's understanding of history from yet another point of view. Worth a read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book will stay with you.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
NOT... Those who refuse to learn from the past are doomed to repeat it.
pedigreedmutt More than 1 year ago
not what i thought it would be, hard to get started into, but now am interested. it gives insight to a time and place in history that i am not as knowledgeable as i should be. interesting how she and Soros teamed up to provide textbooks to eastern bloc for schools desperately in need of books. i recommend this book if one is interested in what happened post wwII and cold war. factual acct for the persons involved.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A lesson in world history, politics, economics and societal relationships. Survival under the worst conditions and the after affects suffered by the victims and their famiies. Well worth reading.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I thought this was going to be a story if survivors of the holocaust, but that fact was barely touched on. This was incredibly dry, boring and dull. It bounced all over the place making no sense at all. A true history book on the holocaust would have been more interesting. Would not recommend this book at all. It is terrible.
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