The Bunny's Night-Light: A Glow-in-the-Dark Search

The Bunny's Night-Light: A Glow-in-the-Dark Search

by Geoffrey Hayes
     
 

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When Little Bunny can't sleep because "there's too much dark at night," it's up to Papa to find just the right night-light for his little bunny. The pair go for a walk around the woods and Papa points out the possibilities. Perhaps the moon is the ideal night-light? Or maybe the fireflies will be able to help? Or even the little glowworm? Featuring luminescent

Overview

When Little Bunny can't sleep because "there's too much dark at night," it's up to Papa to find just the right night-light for his little bunny. The pair go for a walk around the woods and Papa points out the possibilities. Perhaps the moon is the ideal night-light? Or maybe the fireflies will be able to help? Or even the little glowworm? Featuring luminescent nighttime illustrations that glow in the dark, and a comforting text, this bedtime story will resonate with little bunnies and their parents.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Hayes’s (the Benny and Penny books) sweet bedtime book has gentle, repetitive prose that tells the story of Bunny and her Papa, who go searching for a nightlight. Bunny objects to all the lights they find (the moon is “too bright,” the stars “too twinkly,” the fireflies “too busy”) until Mama presents Bunny with the perfect nightlight, which casts comforting shadows on the wall. The book’s lilting rhythms end with a poem that ties into the book’s underlying, reassuring message that while nighttime may seem dark, “here’s always a light somewhere.” Just right for the subject matter, Hayes’s cartoons are, as usual, friendly and warm, including cozy village scenes surrounded by a gray-blue border filled with images of clouds, bedtime reading, and the night sky. Throughout the book, various light sources—those mentioned in the story and others—are treated with a glow-in-the-dark coating. While the gimmick is likely to please young readers, having to repeatedly turn the lights on and off (in order to appreciate the phosphorescent effect) may make for some slow-glowing bedtime reading. Ages 3–6. (Jan.)
Children's Literature - Peg Glisson
Bunny cannot sleep because "There's too much dark at night." He and Papa go off on a search for a night-light and find many things that light up the night: the moon, stars, fireflies, boat lights, house lights, porch lights, streetlights abound in the woods and in cozy Bunny Town; but something is not quite right with each of these. One is too bright, another too busy, yet another too twinkly. Papa finally suggests they ask Mama, who happens to have packed away her own nightlight from her childhood. It is perfect, casting soft boat-like shadows on Bunny's walls as it takes away the darkness. Bunny's patient Papa understands the need for finding the "just right" light, throwing in a bit of humor as they search. Hayes' quiet, rhythmic, and occasionally rhyming text, which makes it clear Papa will not give up until Bunny feels comfortable, is spot on for a bedtime story for a young child. The illustrations, more traditional than those in Hayes' Benny and Penny books, are softly colored and filled with details that invite close observation. Cheerful and cozy, they help set the tone of the book. Bluish-gray borders are filled with images of nighttime creatures, flora, and reading, each of which appears in one of the main illustrations as well. Light sources throughout the illustrations are coated so they will glow in the dark; however this feature is disappointing. It only seems to work if you alternate from light (to read the words) to darkness, then back to light for reading the next page, etc. Youngsters are apt to be frustrated by the awkwardness of this unnecessary gimmick. This gently quiet book is likely to be requested multiple times. Reviewer: Peg Glisson
Kirkus Reviews
When Bunny announces that he cannot sleep because "[t]here's too much dark at night," he and Papa go off on the subtitle's promised "Glow-in-the-Dark Search" for the perfect night-light. The text presents a comforting, if slight exchange between father and child as Papa points out potential night-lights and Bunny rejects them: The moon? Too bright. Stars? Too twinkly. Fireflies? Too busy. Papa never loses patience as their hunt takes them from their front door to field and shore and all around rabbit town, when Papa finally realizes that Bunny wants a light in his room. They return home again, where Mama solves the problem by unpacking the night-light she used as a child. Each spread is framed by a repeating border of vignettes in soothing indigo blue. The illustrations are suffused with earthy colors and muted pinks, blues and greens, creating such a cozy scene of town and home that children will want to move in. However, the rabbits' faces are sometimes distorted, and the promised glow-in-the-dark lights are disappointingly dim unless read under the covers, spread by spread, with a flashlight flicking on and off. The book, a revision of A Night-Light for Bunny (2004), is only partly successful in execution. Children who want soothing at bedtime may do better with House in the Night, by Susan Marie Swanson and illustrated by Beth Krommes (2008), or the classic Goodnight Moon. (Picture book. 2-5)
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 1—Bunny can't sleep because of the dark bedroom and goes on a search with Papa for a suitable night-light. He suggests stars, but Bunny scoffs, "The stars are too twinkly to be a good night-light for me," so Papa then suggests the moon, a glowworm, and fireflies. Finally Mama has a solution to the problem. Hayes's characteristically cozy artwork will bring smiles to the faces of children and adults. Bunny's expressions range from concern to exasperation to disbelief that Papa would even suggest a streetlight as a possibility. Attractive borders frame the cartoonlike artwork. Each picture has at least one small fuzzy sticker that actually glows in the dark. After the initial reading of this bedtime story, the lights may be turned out and the pages turned one more time to view the glowing stickers. A sure choice to be reread.—Blair Christolon, Prince William Public Library System, Manassas, VA

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780375869266
Publisher:
Random House Children's Books
Publication date:
01/24/2012
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
7.50(w) x 10.20(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
3 - 7 Years

Meet the Author

GEOFFREY HAYES has written and illustrated more than 40 children's books, including the popular series of Otto and Uncle Tooth Mysteries (Step into Reading), the beloved Bear by Himself, and the Patrick Bearbooks. In 2010, Geoffrey received the Theodor Seuss Geisel Award for Benny and Penny in the Big No-No.

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