×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

The Business Traveling Parent: How to Stay Close to Your Kids When You're Far Away
     

The Business Traveling Parent: How to Stay Close to Your Kids When You're Far Away

by Dan Verdick
 

See All Formats & Editions

Over 100 ideas for before you leave, while you're gone, and when you come home...

Does business travel force you to leave your children for days or even weeks at a time? Now, author Dan Verdick gives you a wealth of easy ideas, tips, tricks, and games to stay involved in your children's lives despite spending so much time away from home. With just a few

Overview

Over 100 ideas for before you leave, while you're gone, and when you come home...

Does business travel force you to leave your children for days or even weeks at a time? Now, author Dan Verdick gives you a wealth of easy ideas, tips, tricks, and games to stay involved in your children's lives despite spending so much time away from home. With just a few moments a day and The Business Traveling Parent, you can make a world of difference in the life of your child.

Traveling in airplanes, visiting distant cities and staying in hotels provide a basis for dozens of fun, creative stay-in-touch games and activities that are guaranteed to brighten the days of business traveling parents--and their children.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781589040045
Publisher:
Gryphon House Inc.
Publication date:
01/01/2003
Pages:
144
Product dimensions:
7.00(w) x 8.70(h) x 0.40(d)

Read an Excerpt




Chapter One


Before You Go


       There are basically two types of business trips: the one that's been on your calendar for weeks and the one that sneaks up on you suddenly. With either one, getting ready often feels like a hassle. You have to arrange and confirm travel plans or put your schedule in the hands of an agent or assistant. You may need to rush to complete work for the trip, pack, fight traffic and get to the airport or station, land, get to the place you're staying, check messages, return e-mails, send faxes, make phone calls, and more. On top of all that, you need to make sure that your work at the office will be covered while you're away.


But what may be the most difficult is the schedule-juggling that takes place at home as a result of your trip. You may have to make special arrangements for childcare and babysitters, and it's up to your spouse and children to take care of all the household duties alone. Your spouse and children may also have to juggle their schedules to accommodate your impending trip. Your child may not even understand why you have to leave. These added issues often increase the guilt you feel about leaving your family.


Remember, even if you don't have much time before you go, you can still do some little things that will mean a lot to your child. This section will provide you with some ideas and activities for softening the blow of your upcoming absence. From simply spending time together before you go to scheduling when you'll send her mail, you and your child will find one or more of theseactivities helpful in creating long-distance bonds.


Did You Get My Note?


Write a "love note" to your child, saying how much you'll miss him or her while you're away. Put it someplace where your child is sure to see it after you're gone: on a bed pillow, taped to the bathroom mirror, hidden inside a sock drawer. For an unexpected twist, tuck the note in a surprise place where it may not be found right away: in your child's backpack, on the dash- board of the car, or even in the refrigerator.


Variation

Ask your child to write you a note or draw a picture. After you leave the room, have your child hide it in your luggage. (Your spouse can help younger children with this activity, because they may also remove items you need for your trip!)


Where Are You Going?


Using a map or atlas, tracing paper, and a pencil, trace the outline of your destination (state, country, or province). Then draw a large dot on the city or town where you'll stay, and for older kids, mark other nearby areas. Challenge your kids to fill in the missing names of the places you've traced and marked. See if they can find and name the capital of the region or other well-known locations.


Variation

Have them page through the atlas or go to the map to see where the drawing "fits."


Before You
Go Tip


Reading maps is a
great way to help
your children
learn about
geography and
travel, and locating
your destination
helps them see
exactly where
you'll be. Keep a
variety of maps
handy and pull
them out before
you travel.


Itinerary Swap


Give your child copies of your flight itinerary, daily agenda, and any other materials that detail your trip schedule. Ask him or her to create his or her own detailed itinerary for the time you're gone, showing what he or she will be doing during and after school and on weekends. This way, both you and your young "assistant" will know exactly where the other will be during the days you're gone.


Before You
Go Tip


Collect travel-related
items such
as maps, coloring
books with a
travel theme,
stickers of airplanes,
and so on,
depending on
your child's age
and interests.
Pull these out for
your child before
each trip. When
you return, put
these items away
for the next trip.
This way they'll be
viewed as special
items to look forward
to enjoying.
Don't forget to
restock!


It's For You!


Review your travel schedule and your children's schedules; decide together the best times for you (or them) to call. Mark these times on both schedules. Have your children use stickers or draw a telephone on the calendar. You may want to schedule these calls as near as you can to big events, so it's easier for you to share in the moment. Even if schedules are tight, a little time on the phone can mean the world to younger children. For older kids, it's a great way to have a conversation and stay in touch despite busy schedules.


Family Checklist


Together, brainstorm a list of things that need to be done around the house before you go. Include anything that comes to mind, both the necessary and the silly, from giving the dog a bath to making little beds for a collection of stuffed animals. Then, with your kids' help, prioritize the list, and get started on the chores as a group.


A Farewell Meal


This is one of the easiest ways to establish a routine around your business travel. Make something special out of your last dinner or breakfast before you leave. If you're pressed for time, have a pizza delivered or order take-out. If you have more time, you can be the chef. Have fun and enjoy a meal together.


Create a Keepsake Box


Together with your children, decorate a folder, binder, or even a large shoebox for them to store any art or schoolwork while you're out of town. Then, when you return, you can make an event of going through the box and talking about the contents. Did someone do well on a test? Or make a special art project? Did anybody learn something fun at school? Encourage your children to include any items they choose—paintings, writings, or even a pressed flower or leaf.

Meet the Author


Dan Verdick is the author of The Business Traveling Parent.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews