The Busy Body Book: A Kid's Guide to Fitness

The Busy Body Book: A Kid's Guide to Fitness

by Lizzy Rockwell
     
 

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A celebration of the amazing human machine and a life on the move!

Your amazing body can jump, sprint, twist, and twirl. Your body is built to move.

Lizzy Rockwell explains how your bones and muscles, heart and lungs, nerves and brain all work together to keep you on the go. Kids walk and skate and tumble through these pages with such exuberance that even

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Overview

A celebration of the amazing human machine and a life on the move!

Your amazing body can jump, sprint, twist, and twirl. Your body is built to move.

Lizzy Rockwell explains how your bones and muscles, heart and lungs, nerves and brain all work together to keep you on the go. Kids walk and skate and tumble through these pages with such exuberance that even sprouting couch potatoes will want to get up and bounce around—and that’s the ultimate goal. Studies show that American kids are becoming more sedentary and more overweight and that they carry these tendencies with them into adolescence and adulthood. Experts agree that we need to help kids make physical activity a life-long habit. Through education, information, and encouragement, this book aims to inspire a new generation of busy bodies!

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
The zippy alliterative title is indicative of the bouncy and busy tone of the text and illustration that follow. With the current emphasis on physical fitness and our need to get today's kids more active, this lively little number helps children understand how their bodies are composed and function. Well-diagramed illustrations of the bones, muscles, brain and nerves, lungs, heart and blood vessels, and stomach and intestines can be used with children as young as pre-school to help them grasp what goes on inside their bodies. The author stresses maintaining a healthy body and suggests several activities to strengthen, stretch, and tone the body. The neat thing about these activities they all involve games and sports kids like to play like soccer, sledding, roller skating, riding a bike, swimming, and just plain walking the dog. Watercolor illustration show happy, active children engaged in fun and invigorating exercise. Kids will peddle, push, twist, and turn themselves into better shape once someone has introduced this enthusiastic call to action to them. 2004, Crown, Ages 4 to 6.
—Beverley Fahey
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 1-"Busy bodies bounce up/and down./They stretch from side to side and run all around./They catch and throw. They push and pull./They pedal, they paddle, they roller-skate, too./When you get busy, what do you do?" So begins this guide to physical activity. In her letter to parents and teachers, Rockwell discusses the rise in childhood obesity in the United States, and her hope that this book will serve as encouragement for youngsters to choose an active lifestyle. Children from a variety of ethnic backgrounds are represented in the artwork; they are shown doing yoga, dancing, playing team sports, Rollerblading, wheelchair racing, and even dog walking. Interspersed throughout are labeled diagrams that explain the workings of the body's skeleton, muscles, brain and nerves, lungs, heart and blood vessels, and stomach and intestines. The role that physical activity plays in keeping these parts healthy is also discussed. The text is purposely motivating, yet easy to understand and informative. The age-appropriate artwork is colorful and lively, and provides just the right amount of detail. This title fills a void about this topic for the age group, and parents and early childhood educators will appreciate its many uses.-Shauna Yusko, King County Library System, Bellevue, WA Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
This well-meaning introduction to physical fitness and the workings of the human body bounces around thematically rather like the two children on pogo sticks shown on the cover, without addressing the crux of the matter: kids who don't exercise are likely to be overweight. Smiling children of different ethnic backgrounds are shown engaging in a variety of recreational activities and sports, interwoven with text that first cheerfully extols the value of exercise and then explains the major systems of the body. A full-page diagram illustrates each system (skeleton, muscles, lungs, etc.), including basic information and additional interesting facts. A concluding double spread shows a grid with children in 40 different activities that promote "busy bodies." The back matter includes two pages of exercise guidelines and an author's note to parents and teachers addressing the epidemic of childhood obesity. Although Rockwell avoids some touchy areas in the text, her introduction to this complex subject may be a useful springboard for discussion, especially in elementary classrooms. (Nonfiction. 5-9)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780553113747
Publisher:
Random House Children's Books
Publication date:
07/08/2008
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
40
Sales rank:
282,874
Product dimensions:
8.50(w) x 11.00(h) x 0.20(d)
Age Range:
3 - 7 Years

Read an Excerpt

Dear Parents and Teachers,

It's easy to see that children love to move. How many times have you had to ask a child to sit still—in the car, at school, or at the dining table? Being physically active makes kids feel good. They breathe deeply, filling their lungs with energizing oxygen. They use their muscles, releasing mood-improving endorphins. Regular physical activity helps children eat well, sleep well, perform well in school, resist illness, and grow strong, cheerful, and confident.

The good news is that being physically active is natural for children. The bad news is that today many children are not active enough to stay healthy. The number of seriously overweight children in the United States has tripled in the past twenty years. Obesity is linked to other serious health risks such as diabetes, heart disease, osteoporosis, and depression. While diet plays a major role in our children's health, physical activity is an equally important factor. Surveys show that as many as half of our children do not get even a moderate (30 minutes a day, five days a week) amount of exercise. Yet they now spend an average of four hours a day in front of the TV or computer. Even children who do not gain weight easily are often not active enough to keep their heart, lungs, bones, and muscles in good condition. By giving our children education and positive guidance, we take the first steps in breaking this pattern.

When children know about the remarkable potential of their bodies, they want to test it out. When they see others engaged in activities that look fun and stimulating, they want to join in. As parents and educators, we can set examples of healthy living by making changes in our own habits. Small lifestyle adjustments can communicate that fitness is a priority. We can walk to school or the store, set limits on sedentary activities, take the stairs instead of the elevator. In The Busy Body Book, I have chosen friendly, encouraging words and images that I hope will inspire children to make their own good choices. This book is for the competitive athlete as well as the contemplative artist. I hope that all children will find themselves in its pages, feel proud of their bodies, and be inspired to move. Physical activity is natural for all of us. So let's get busy and have some fun!

With warm wishes,
Lizzy Rockwell

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