Byways Of Ghost-Land

( 4 )

Overview

12 Strange And Creepy Stories From An Original Writer For "Weird Tales."

Contents: Unknown Brain; Occult in Shadows; Obsession, Possession; Occult Hooligans; Sylvan Horrors; Complex Hauntings and Occult Bestialities; Vampires, Werewolves, Fox Women, etc.; Death Warnings and Family Ghosts; Superstitions and Fortunes; Hand of Glory, Bloody Hand of Ulster, Seventh Son, Birth Marks, Nature's Devil Signals, Preexistence, The Future, Projection, ...

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Byways of Ghost-Land

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Overview

12 Strange And Creepy Stories From An Original Writer For "Weird Tales."

Contents: Unknown Brain; Occult in Shadows; Obsession, Possession; Occult Hooligans; Sylvan Horrors; Complex Hauntings and Occult Bestialities; Vampires, Werewolves, Fox Women, etc.; Death Warnings and Family Ghosts; Superstitions and Fortunes; Hand of Glory, Bloody Hand of Ulster, Seventh Son, Birth Marks, Nature's Devil Signals, Preexistence, The Future, Projection, Telepathy; Occult Inhabitants of the Sea and Rivers; Buddhas and Boggle Chairs.

First published in 1911, by the author of "Scottish Ghost Stories", "Animal Ghosts", "Werwolves" and numerous other titles on the supernatural.

Elliott O'Donnell was an Irish author known primarily for his books about ghosts. He claimed to have seen a ghost, described as an elemental figured covered with spots, when he was five years old. He also claimed to have been strangled by a mysterious phantom in Dublin. In later life he became a ghost hunter. His first book, written in his spare time, was a psychic thriller titled For Satan's Sake (1904). From this point onward, he became a writer. He wrote several popular novels, including an occult fantasy, The Sorcery Club (1912) [1] but specialized in what were claimed as true stories of ghosts and hauntings. These were immensely popular, but his flamboyant style and amazing stories suggest that he embroidered fact with a romantic flair for fiction. O'Donnell wrote material for numerous magazines, including Hutchinson Story Magazine, The Novel Magazine, The Idler, Weekly Tale-Teller, Hutchinson's Mystery-Story Magazine, Pearson's Magazine, Lilliput and Weird Tales.

As he became known as an authority on the supernatural, he was called upon as a ghost hunter. He also lectured and broadcast (radio and television) on the paranormal in Britain and the United States. In addition to his more than 50 books, he wrote scores of articles and stories for national newspapers and magazines. He claimed "I have investigated, sometimes alone, and sometimes with other people and the press, many cases of reputed hauntings. I believe in ghosts but am not a spiritualist."

"Whether all that constitutes man's spiritual nature, that is to say, ALL his mind, is inseparably amalgamated with the whitish mass of soft matter enclosed in his cranium and called his brain, is a question that must, one supposes, be ever open to debate."

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781482097276
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform
  • Publication date: 1/27/2013
  • Pages: 236
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 2.5
( 4 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 3, 2011

    Jalin early

    It scared the crap out of me.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 15, 2014

    This was free but suddenly is not

    There are a number of public doman books tha once were free reading but suddenly are not on barnes and noble....

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 6, 2014

    Ghost s Ghosr hunting of the late 19th and 20th century

    Hard to get a grip on where the author gained his rep as a ghost hunter. He seems to be known as a ghost hunter thus gains entry into various establishments to interview abt ghostly experiences. Very little hunting is done in this collection. He seems to have fetish for hands...he mention hands multiple times in this and other works...particularly fond of nails like filberts?

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 22, 2013

    Ridiculous theories of the supernatural

    This book is chock-full of the author's ideas on what the true nature of various ghosts, hauntings, and supernatural visitations might be (including copious usage of his own made-up words for such creatures--it rather puts one in mind of the "stop trying to make 'fetch' happen" exchange in 'Mean Girls'), and virtually all of them are silly beyond belief. As an extra bonus, some are offensive beyond belief --- e.g., his assertion that mental disability is the result of "psychical vampires" and that the mentally disabled are all dangerous and should be put to death for humanity's sake; or his repeated snobberies about how the middle and lower classes are just by nature infinitely more inclined towards cruelty, selfishness, and violence, as evidenced by the shape of their money-grubbing, unbeautiful hands (which, paradoxically, he believes develops along with the personality largely through nurture, rather than as a reslt of genetics.) At one point, he writes that he has no choice but to believe in past lives; how else to explain the various misfortunes that have befallen him in his present unblemished lifetime if they are not punishment for past mistakes of a former self? The possibility that he might rather deserve misfortune by merit of being a snobby, bigoted jerk, even for his era (the late 19th-early 20th century) seems never to have occurred to him.

    And to top it all off, he doesn't even offer much in the way of good ghost stories, and what little he does provide seem to be simply reprints of other people's stories... Ugh. He must have been one of the most obnoxious "artistes" the world has ever known...

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