The Cabin: Reminiscence and Diversions

The Cabin: Reminiscence and Diversions

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by David Mamet
     
 

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In these mordant, elegant, and often disquieting essays, the internationally acclaimed dramatist creates a sort of autobiography by strobe light, one that is both mysterious and starkly revealing.

The pieces in The Cabin are about places and things: the suburbs of Chicago, where as a boy David Mamet helplessly watched his stepfather terrorize his sister; New…  See more details below

Overview

In these mordant, elegant, and often disquieting essays, the internationally acclaimed dramatist creates a sort of autobiography by strobe light, one that is both mysterious and starkly revealing.

The pieces in The Cabin are about places and things: the suburbs of Chicago, where as a boy David Mamet helplessly watched his stepfather terrorize his sister; New York City, where as a young man he had to eat his way through a mountain of fried matzoh to earn a night of sexual bliss. They are about guns, campaign buttons, and a cabin in the Vermont woods that stinks of wood smoke and kerosene -- and about their associations of pleasure, menace, and regret.

The resulting volume may be compared to the plays that have made Mamet famous: it is finely crafted and deftly timed, and its precise language carries an enormous weight of feeling.


From the Trade Paperback edition.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
This pleasurable amalgam of travelogue and reminiscence explores Mamet's early years in Chicago and New York and his current life as a successful playwright. (Dec.)
Mary Carroll
Readers put off by the expletives of the real estate salesmen in "Glengarry Glen Ross" will discover a very different diction in Mamet's "Cabin". To be sure, the two essays reflecting on Mamet's family betray coiled tension and unresolved anger reminiscent of his dramas: "The Rake" describes violence and cruelty in his mother and stepfather's former model home in a suburb south of Chicago; "The Watch" brings Mamet home from college for a birthday of betrayed hopes and miscommunication with his father on the city's North Side. But other Chicago essays--"W.F.M.T.," "The Hotel Lincoln," "Wabash Avenue," and "Seventy-First and Jeffrey"--celebrate the past, as do most of Mamet's recollections of other part-time or full-time homes: summer camp, Chelsea in New York City, Montreal and environs, London, and New England. The collection also offers Mamet's observations on summer jobs, a golf outing to Scotland, the Cannes Film Festival, and the guns and pinback buttons he collects. "The Cabin"'s essays deserve attention--in themselves and for the light they shed on Mamet's theater and film work.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780307787514
Publisher:
Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Publication date:
04/13/2011
Sold by:
Random House
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
176
File size:
2 MB

Meet the Author

David Mamet is the author of various plays, including American Buffalo, Sexual Perversity in Chicago, Speed-the-Plow, Glengarry Glen Ross (for which he won the Pulitzer Prize), and Oleanna. He has written and directed the films Homicide, House of Games, and Things Change (written with Shel Silverstein), and has written the screenplays for The Untouchables and Hoffa. He is the author of tow previous collections, Writing in Restaurants and Some Freaks. Mamet lives in Massachusetts and Vermont.


From the Trade Paperback edition.

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