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The Caldwell Objects and How to Observe Them
     

The Caldwell Objects and How to Observe Them

by Martin Mobberley
 

The Messier's catalog of 109 'non-stellar' objects is still used by amateur astronomers as a guide to interesting objects to view and image. In 1995 the notable English astronomer and broadcaster Sir Patrick Moore published his own catalog of a further 109 objects, to complement the Messier catalog and provide an extended list of fascinating targets for amateur

Overview

The Messier's catalog of 109 'non-stellar' objects is still used by amateur astronomers as a guide to interesting objects to view and image. In 1995 the notable English astronomer and broadcaster Sir Patrick Moore published his own catalog of a further 109 objects, to complement the Messier catalog and provide an extended list of fascinating targets for amateur astronomers. He called it the Caldwell Catalog (Sir Patrick's full name is Patrick Alfred Caldwell-Moore), the 'M' designation having already been used by Messier. Some of the objects included are Caldwell 11 (The Bubble Nebula), spiral galaxy Calwell 30, and Caldwell 49 and 50 (The Rosette Nebulae).

Along with Messier's list and Herschel's list of mostly faint 'non-stellar' objects, the Caldwell objects are now programmed into many automated telescope controllers. This allows all of these objects to be located easily even by newcomer astronomers. The Caldwell objects are just as spectacular as the 'M' objects, especially when using the large telescopes and the sensitive CCD cameras readily available today.

The Caldwell Objects and How to Observe Them comprehensively describes all of the 109 Caldwell objects, with specific advice on how to find them (if necessary with a 'Go-To' telescope), how to visually observe or image them, and how to image-process the results. There is information about the optimum astronomical equipment to use for each object and, for those who prefer to make sketches, there is advice on drawing these extended objects at the eyepiece.

Editorial Reviews

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From the reviews:

“A well balanced, expert and practical book with which to arm oneself before setting about the Caldwell Objects, which will appeal to amateur astronomers at all levels of experience. In his usual style the author introduces some humour into the text … . I recommend you buy The Caldwell Objects and how to observe them.” (Gordon Rogers, Journal of the British Astronomical Association, Vol. 120 (1), 2010)

“If you’re tired of the same old Messier objects and want to see something that doesn’t have an ‘M’ number, The Caldwell Objects And How To Observe them is definitely for you. Its detailed information tells you how best to observe the 109 deep-sky objects … . Mobberley’s book … has all the depth and usefulness you need. Overall … this is a very practical and highly recommended book.” (Paul Money, Sky at Night Magazine, March, 2010)

“Book, as expected, is primarily concerned with the description and details of the Caldwell objects and these are covered to the depth suitable for an amateur astronomer. … It sets out to be a reference book … . author’s personality and humour does come through in his writing, making the book an easv and enjoyable read … . charts do provide the reader with the general location in the sky and for this they are useful. … I would happily add it to my collection.” (Simon Dawes, The Observatory, Vol. 130, August, 2010)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781441903259
Publisher:
Springer New York
Publication date:
10/06/2009
Series:
Astronomers' Observing Guides Series
Edition description:
2009
Pages:
273
Product dimensions:
7.00(w) x 9.20(h) x 0.60(d)

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