Call of the Wild and White Fang (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)

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Overview

The Call of the Wild and White Fang, by Jack London, is part of the Barnes & Noble Classics series, which offers quality editions at affordable prices to the student and the general reader, including new scholarship, thoughtful design, and pages of carefully crafted extras. Here are some of the remarkable features of Barnes & Noble Classics:
  • New introductions ...
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The Call of the Wild and White Fang (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)

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Overview

The Call of the Wild and White Fang, by Jack London, is part of the Barnes & Noble Classics series, which offers quality editions at affordable prices to the student and the general reader, including new scholarship, thoughtful design, and pages of carefully crafted extras. Here are some of the remarkable features of Barnes & Noble Classics:
  • New introductions commissioned from today's top writers and scholars
  • Biographies of the authors
  • Chronologies of contemporary historical, biographical, and cultural events
  • Footnotes and endnotes
  • Selective discussions of imitations, parodies, poems, books, plays, paintings, operas, statuary, and films inspired by the work
  • Comments by other famous authors
  • Study questions to challenge the reader's viewpoints and expectations
  • Bibliographies for further reading
  • Indices & Glossaries, when appropriate
All editions are beautifully designed and are printed to superior specifications; some include illustrations of historical interest. Barnes & Noble Classics pulls together a constellation of influences—biographical, historical, and literary—to enrich each reader's understanding of these enduring works.


Jack London’s two greatest novels, The Call of the Wild and White Fang—originally intended as companions—are here compiled in one volume. The Call of the Wild centers on a domesticated dog, Buck, who is kidnapped and sold to Klondike gold hunters. To survive Buck must listen to the Call and learn the ways of his wolf-ancestors, who guide him from within.

White Fang tells the story of a half-wolf, half-dog nearly destroyed by the vicious cruelty of men. Brought to the very brink of his existence, White Fang is lucky enough to experience the one thing that can save him—human love.

Adventurer and activist, philosopher and alcoholic, Jack London was a man of great contradictions and greater talent. Both of these novels are written in a simple, direct, and powerful style that decades of readers have admired and that writers have imitated.

Tina Gianquitto holds a Ph.D. in American Literature from Columbia University and currently teaches at The College of the Mines in Colorado.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781593082000
  • Publisher: Barnes & Noble
  • Publication date: 6/1/2004
  • Series: Barnes & Noble Classics Series
  • Pages: 336
  • Sales rank: 72,243
  • Product dimensions: 7.96 (w) x 5.26 (h) x 0.93 (d)

Meet the Author

Tina Gianquitto holds a Ph.D. in American Literature from Columbia University and currently teaches at The College of the Mines in Colorado.
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Read an Excerpt

From Tina Gianquitto's Introduction to The Call of the Wild and White Fang

By the time London boarded the steamer for his trip from San Francisco to Alaska, he had already led a colorful and dramatic life. He was a sloop owner and oyster poacher on San Francisco Bay and a deputy for the Fish Patrol at fifteen, a sailor traveling through the North and South Pacific hunting seals at seventeen, a coal-shoveler in a power plant, a Socialist, and a tramp at eighteen. By nineteen, a weary London saw himself, with others of the working classes, near "the bottom of the [Social] Pit . . . myself above them, not far, and hanging on to the slippery wall by main strength and sweat" (London, War of the Classes, pp. 274-275; see "For Further Reading"). Although London was far from relinquishing his love of the active life, he feared being ruled by it. London fought in these early years to educate himself, and by that education to get himself out of the hard-laboring classes. As his hero informs his readers in the semi-autobiographical novel Martin Eden, writing offered a way to stoke the fires of both the body and the imagination, and so with characteristic determination, London set himself to the task of becoming a professional writer. By 1896, however, he realized that writing alone could not support a hungry family. The following year, London and his brother-in-law Captain James H. Shepard decided to try their luck panning for gold in the recently discovered strikes along the Yukon River in the Klondike.

After disembarking in Juneau, Alaska, London, Shepard and their companions made their way to Dyea, the principle departure point for the gold fields of the Yukon and the Klondike. Buck travels the same trails that London covered-leaving Dyea, making the arduous climb over Chilcoot Pass, and pushing on to Lakes Linderman and Bennett before making the waters of the Yukon River. From here, the party traveled downstream, toward Dawson City, where they navigated the dangerous White Horse and Five Finger Rapids before reaching the relative safety of Split-Up Island, 80 miles from Dawson between the Stewart River and Henderson Creek. London staked a claim near here and made a brief visit to Dawson City to record the claim. He returned to the island, where the group passed the winter in an old miner's cabin. These long five months proved difficult for London, who contracted scurvy by the spring from poor diet and lack of exercise.

Upon his return to San Francisco in 1898, London began his writing career in earnest. Clearly, the Klondike turned London into a writer of note, not only because he was able to tap into a ready market for all things Gold Rush, but more important, because the landscape offered London a barren theater for his characters to work out their paths in life. If, as London believed, environment determined the course of an individual's life, then the austere and brutal, yet ultimately simple environment of the North tested the capacities of the individual (and by extension, the species) to adapt to the environment.

London's intellectual experiences during the winter spent on Split-Up Island are as important as his physical ones; he spent his time reading, rereading, and sharing with his friends the two books he carried with him to the wilderness: Milton's Paradise Lost and Darwin's On the Origin of Species. Less than a year after his return to San Francisco, London summed up his understanding of Darwin in a letter to his friend Cloudesley Johns: "Natural selection, undeviating, pitiless, careless alike of the individual or the species, destroyed or allowed to perpetuate, as the case might be, such breeds as were unfittest or fittest to survive" (Labor, p. 101). Such struggle characterizes human and animal life in The Call of the Wild and White Fang.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 405 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(196)

4 Star

(95)

3 Star

(55)

2 Star

(28)

1 Star

(31)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 407 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 11, 2013

    Sincerely Excellent

    Call of the Wild and White Fang are two of my favorite books.
    I enjoyed reading them because of my love for wolves.



    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 5, 2012

    An Amazing Book!!! I read this book in seventh grade Literature

    An Amazing Book!!!

    I read this book in seventh grade Literature class and I LOVED THIS BOOK!!!!! I'm eighth grade right now and I've already read this book three other times!!

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 21, 2012

    Great

    Wild book...

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 26, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    A bit strange, but a good read nevertheless

    These two books, being the Call of the Wild and White Fang, were very unique books indeed. The first novel, the Call of the Wild, follows the story of the domesticated dog Buck, who is rather wolf-like in appearance, who is unexpectedly stolen from his comfortable life and his loving master and thrown into the harsh challenges of a violent world. Throughout the majority of this first book, the story tells of Buck's hardships, as he is forced into the crude (and gory) sport of dog fighting, and is faced with ever-abusive (and changing) owners, all the while coming to learn of the law of kill or be killed. White Fang, the second of the two novels, follows the wolf called, obviously, White Fang, who, as opposed to Buck, is thrust into the confusing realm of men, which results in his gradual domestication.

    Both of these novels I largely recommend, although they are somewhat strange in their forthcoming, and at some points a tad gory, but not extensively. Full of action, yet embellished with a noticeable realism, Jack London gives as a grand portrayal of looking through a canine's eyes. Although the author seems like a low-life (if you were to read his autobiography! A drunk and having gone to jail on several occasions!!!), his writing doesn't at all portray it, and I strongly recommend that you give these novels a try.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 4, 2012

    Exeptional read

    London uses amazing technic and style to tell this tale through the eyes of a Husky dog, Buck. Buck learns through trial and error the importance and effectiveness of leadership. London's tale can also compare to us as humans, and how we react and adapt to the harsh conditions of life. This book is a timeless classic that everyone should read some point in their life. Jessica the bug freak

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 31, 2012

    Quite a good book

    This particular novel combined the two books, Call of the Wild and White Fang, both written by Jack London. The first book, Call of the Wild, is about a Saint Bernard named Buck who was born and raised in a luxurious life with very wealthy owners. Then one day, he was kidnapped from his opulent life and sold to Alaskan gold seekers as a sled dog. In order to stay alive in the Alaskan Wilderness, Buck must learn: to scavenge every scrap of food he can get, the "Law of Club and Fang", how to fit in with the pack and, most importantly, how to fight. Throughout his perilous adventure, Buck has to endure the cruelty of his malicious masters, an innumerous amount of wounds from thousands of battles, and the harsh conditions of the winter to survive the American Northwest. The second novel, White Fang, is about a wolf that is half dog that grew up in the Wild. the first few months of his life are spent with his mother in the Wild, but they accidentally stumble into the hands of indians who amaze him with their "powers". These ways of man cause White Fang to believe that they are his gods and that his calling in life is to serve them. His wolfness causes him to be shunned and hated by all dogs that he meets, which molds White Fang into a ferocious fighter, a very agile speedster, and makes the wolf much more faithful to men. This faithfulness introduces him to the evil part of mankind that changes him into a merciless monster that loathes anything and everything that is living. However, one man treats him differently from the others, but in a good way. Using the power of love, his new god rids White Fang of his hatred and replaces it with an affinity towards him.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 18, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    i like this book

    i like this book bec it is about kid looking for gold and advntres and that is what i like

    2 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 11, 2013

    Wait wait wait

    It says white fang is it white fang or this buck guy!!!!!!!!!! Im so confused please help!!!!!

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 29, 2012

    C.L.T. please aanswer this puestion?

    I have both of these actuall books, just not on my nook. So how many pages does it have? Any pics? Do you happen to know if there actaclly the same as the originals? Thats all. Thank you!

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 29, 2012

    The Call of the Wild by Jack London centers on Buck, a dog that

    The Call of the Wild by Jack London centers on Buck, a dog that was born and raised in a life of comfort and ease on a California estate, but is kidnapped from his life of luxury and his loving master and thrown into the harsh challenges of the north. In order to survive, buck must listen to the Call and learn the ways of his wolf- ancestors to guide him along the way.
    Throughout the majority of the book, the story tells of Buck's hardships, as he is forced into the cruel and bloody sport of dog fighting, and is faced with many ruthless owners, all the while coming to learn of the law of kill or be killed. A major theme that is constant throughout the book is survival of the fittest, kill or be killed. Only the strongest and most fit will survive.
    I liked this book so much I would pick it up and reread it again. I like dogs so this was an enjoyable book to read. On the other hand though one of my dislikes was that there was some gore in the book, but no extensively, also some of the slang for the people, it made it hard to understand what they were saying and made for a confusing read.
    I do recommend that someone who likes dog and or animals to read this book.I do suggest it to be for an older audience though do to that there are some gruesome parts that may not be appropriate for younger people. I give this book a four star rating. I liked it very much and Jack London gives a portrayal of looking through a canine's eye.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 8, 2011

    BEST INDEPENDENT BOOK EVAAAA!!!!

    This book is like an elegant red whine, it is sold with a companion book Whitefang if you can find it. I just finished it, it is the most descriptive and in depth literature i have ever read. Jack London's writing style is strange, looking back he made out perfectly what was happening in Call of the Wild and Whitefang with nearly no dialect. The animals themselves do not ever talk but the humans bearly talk through the entire book. It is almost perfectly from the animals point of view. The only let down is it was written in 1901 and therefore is one of its kind as fa as i know Jack London does not have many books published i have only heard of these two but superb book a must have in any collection.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 17, 2011

    Amazing

    Just finished call of the wild in less then a week, i didnt want to put it down!

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 17, 2010

    I would review it but the ebooks won't download

    I have downloaded some ebooks from the B&N site, but usually just end up frustrated with a blank document, and no one can really explain it, even though the phone service people are very nice.

    Look, B&N, if you're going to claim to be giving away free ebooks, give 'em away. If we have to torture ourselves with non-functioning Beta level technology then don't call it free. It's not.

    As I said, I would love to review this book, but like my attempt to download _Leaves of Grass_ it ended with nothing but a blank document. Yes I scrolled, yes I have the B&N ereader, yes I know how to use computer technology reasonably well, yes I cleared the books out and tried variously saving or opening the file,yes the book is currently free, yes I chose the B&N reader, nothing worked. Downloaded it five times which is just being stubborn.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 6, 2014

    Wonderful

    Wonderful

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  • Posted June 28, 2014

    Nice,,,, Great...!

    Nice,,,, Great...!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 31, 2014

    Unnamed tom pads in.....

    I wish to join this clan

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 9, 2014

    I'm a human Nyomi

    Please tell me what to do in order to become one of you.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 4, 2014

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 3, 2014

    Jaystar

    "My guardian? It's not your fault." He sighed. "Alright, thank you." He meowed. He looked at Maggotpelt and Wormtongue, shaking his head.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 15, 2013

    Wow

    To much worrirors

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