The Call of the Wild, White Fang

( 7 )

Overview

The Call Of The Wild is the  story of Buck, a dog stolen from his home and thrust  into the merciless life of the Arctic north to  endure hardship, bitter cold, and the savage  lawlessness of man and beast. White Fang  is the adventure of an animal — part dog, part  wolf —turned vicious by cruel abuse, then  transformed by the patience and affection of one man.

  Jack London's superb ability as a storyteller and  his uncanny...

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Call of The Wild, White Fang

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Overview

The Call Of The Wild is the  story of Buck, a dog stolen from his home and thrust  into the merciless life of the Arctic north to  endure hardship, bitter cold, and the savage  lawlessness of man and beast. White Fang  is the adventure of an animal — part dog, part  wolf —turned vicious by cruel abuse, then  transformed by the patience and affection of one man.

  Jack London's superb ability as a storyteller and  his uncanny understanding of animal and human  natures give these tales a striking vitality and  power, and have earned him a reputation as a  distinguished American writer.

The adventures of an unusual dog, part St. Bernard, part Scotch shepherd, that is forcibly taken to the Klondike gold fields where he eventually becomes the leader of a wolf pack.

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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Carolyn Mott Ford
This newly illustrated edition of the author's best-known work is part of the "Scribner Illustrated Classics" collection. The story begins with Buck, a rangy mixed-breed, enjoying the life of a family pet in the sunny climate of California. When gold is discovered in the Klondike, large, healthy dogs are needed to pull the sleds through the snow and over the ice. After Buck is stolen and sold to dog traffickers, his exposure to the harsh life of a pack dog awakens his primordial urges. Buck passes from one owner to the next until he is sold to a threesome lacking the knowledge about what it takes to survive in the Alaskan frontier. Their lack of respect for the elements culminates in a brutal beating of Buck, who is saved by John Thornton. Thornton treats Buck well and, for the first time, Buck feels love for another creature. Nonetheless, the spirit of his ancestors calls to him, and when John Thornton is killed, Buck answers the call. He returns to the wild. The author experienced life in the Klondike during the gold rush of 1897 and his writing about men, animals and nature is stripped of all sentimentality. 1999 (orig.
Booknews
**** An alternative title might be The Annotated Call.... Dyer--a near-mad fan of London--presents the definitive (unbowdlerized) text with maps, photos, drawings clarifying the text. Extensive notes and bibliography. Will surely supplant the Nelson-Hall Casebook cited in BCL3. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780553212334
  • Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 2/28/1991
  • Series: Bantam Classics Series
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Edition description: Reissue
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 296
  • Sales rank: 240,821
  • Product dimensions: 4.18 (w) x 6.86 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 7 )
Rating Distribution

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(6)

4 Star

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3 Star

(1)

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Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 2, 2007

    A reviewer

    This book, published by Bantam Classics, is a combination of two of Jack London¿s greatest fictitious works The Call of the Wild and White Fang. Both novellas deal with the idea of survival of the fittest, and both have a recurring theme of fighting for dominance. Both also have a dog as the main character, and the reader gets to follow these dogs as they fight to stay alive in the Yukon wilderness. In The Call of the Wild, the main character is a dog named Buck, a big St. Bernard-Scotch shepherd dog mix. He starts off life in the Santa Clara valley in California , where he leads a leisurely, relaxing life, only to have it snatched away from him when a worker in his owner¿s house sells him to a man heading north for gold in the Yukon . The rest of the story is all about Buck¿s struggle to gain dominance over not just the other dogs, but life itself. In White Fang, London took the first five chapters to even introduce the main character, White Fang. The way he writes it, however, caught my attention and held it, despite the fact that I didn¿t even know who the story was really about yet. Once you meet White Fang, the story becomes all about his struggles in life, especially with man. He was born a wild and free wolf, so being thrust into the busy and confining world of the Indians was a shock he never quite got over. He is bought and sold to various men seeking gold in the Alaskan wilderness, until he lands with a dog fighter named ¿Beauty Smith¿. The rest of the novella explains White Fang¿s hardships at the hands of this dog fighter, and his life afterwards. Both stories have very similar themes, and use many of the same writing elements. Both stories devote many a page to helping the reader understand the capacity of the dogs¿ thinking and reasoning, because it is essential to the themes of the stories. The way London describes the dogs¿ reasoning process is very unique. He helps you understand why the dog acts or behaves a certain way, through his explanation of their thought process. He describes ¿laws¿ that the dogs either just know, or learn along the way, such as Buck¿s ¿Law of Club and Fang¿, which describes the relationship between the men and the sled-dogs. Both stories are very realistic, and nothing is sugar-coated. One thing London does that I really enjoyed in both stories, is his extremely vivid descriptions of places and characters, inside and out. An example of this is: ¿Beauty Smith enjoyed the task. He delighted in it. He gloated over his victim, and his eyes flamed dully, as he swung the whip or club and listened to White Fang¿s cries of pain and to his helpless bellows and snarls. For Beauty Smith was cruel in the way that cowards are cruel¿Denied the expression of power amongst his own kind, he fell back upon the lesser creatures and there vindicated the life that was in him.¿ The description goes on to explain why Beauty Smith was like this, and so forth and so on, until you have a very thorough understanding of Beauty Smith and his motives, thus understanding the story better. I really enjoyed both stories, and the convenience of having them both in one book. I would recommend this book to anyone who either has read Jack London before, or enjoys realism and stories of survival and fullness of spirit.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 5, 2012

    Wild

    (Pick up where we left off... stupid B&N theyre trying to stop rp))

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 16, 2013

    Maplekit

    He lies down in a pile of roten leaves and snow. "Everyone hates me like my mother said."

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 6, 2013

    Lionpaw

    He drawls up his inner strngth and pushed you hard ebough to make you stumble

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 6, 2013

    TigerNight

    Tiger ; She let herself be pushed hard enough to stumbled and be flipped over. Her paws almost instantly moved to cover her underside. "Remember , when your opponent has flipped you over or your stumbled and fell on your back that you use your paws to protect yourself and get up quickly ," she meowed. She swiftly got up and used the move again , this time flipped him over onto his back.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 18, 2013

    Abby

    Yep!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 18, 2013

    Twopaw

    Here?

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Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews

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