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The Camera

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Overview

Before the camera, there was no easy and quick way to record a memorable scene or a person's likeness. Then, in 1827, Joseph Nic├ęphore Niepce took the world's first photograph. Louis Jacques Mand&233; Daguerre and William Henry Fox Talbot soon developed their own methods for creating photographs, but a good deal of expertise, time, and money were needed to work with the bulky and awkward materials used in early photography. In 1888, George Eastman invented the first Kodak camera with film already loaded into ...
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Overview

Before the camera, there was no easy and quick way to record a memorable scene or a person's likeness. Then, in 1827, Joseph Nic├ęphore Niepce took the world's first photograph. Louis Jacques Mand&233; Daguerre and William Henry Fox Talbot soon developed their own methods for creating photographs, but a good deal of expertise, time, and money were needed to work with the bulky and awkward materials used in early photography. In 1888, George Eastman invented the first Kodak camera with film already loaded into it, making photography widely available to the public. Eastman soon invented roll film that could be removed from the camera by the photographer and replaced with a fresh roll, much as we do with most cameras today. Digital cameras now use computer technology rather than film to capture images, allowing even the amateur to modify and print photographs, and to E-mail them anywhere in the world in an instant.

Turning Point Inventions is the first series of books to focus on the important inventions we often take for granted and how they have affected our lives. In lively text and fascinating pictures, these books explore the world before the invention; the life of the inventor and how he or she came upon the discovery; how the world was changed by the invention; and how it may influence our future. A special full-color foldout in each book shows in detail how the invention works.

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Editorial Reviews

From The Critics
History has been preserved for us not just in writing, but in pictures and photographs as well. The development of the camera has left such an indelible mark on the pages of history that we often take it for granted. This book reminds us of the struggles faced by pioneer photographers who contributed to the development of the sophisticated computer-based cameras of today. The author chronicles the major highlights in the history of the photographic process, as well as famous photographs that emphasize the evolution of the camera. This very informative book will fascinate inquisitive young readers. 2000, Atheneum, $17.95. Ages 8 to 12. Reviewer: D. Cannon SOURCE: Parent Council Volume 8
Children's Literature
The camera is a device that is all too often taken for granted. If we traveled back to the 17th century and demonstrated the workings of even the simplest single use camera of today, we would astound the public. Even 18th century citizens who were familiar with photographic processes like tintypes, Daguerreotypes, and Collodium prints would stand in awe of the simplicity and colorfulness of modern day photos. Yet, as is the case with every machine or instrument of human concoction the camera has a history. It is the tale of the development and evolution of photography that is presented in this informative work. Beginning with the odd efforts of early photographic pioneers to make use of the "camera obscura" to assist artists and culminating with the amazing computer assisted devices of the present age the history of the camera is presented in an informative and entertaining fashion. People such as Louis Daguerre, George Eastman, and Edwin Land are showcased as major contributors to the development of the photographic processes. A particularly interesting portion of this book is the final chapter entitled "Images of the Future" wherein the author takes a look a modern photographic technology and directions that may be taken in the decades to come. Combining a scholarly text with lavish illustrations this book tells a fascinating story that will capture the attention of readers, and especially those with an interest in the science of photography. 2000, Atheneum Books, Ages 10 up, $17.95. Reviewer: Greg M. Romaneck
School Library Journal
Gr 6 Up-From camera obscura to digital imaging, Wallace examines the evolution of photography. Chapters cover what led to the development of the camera and how this invention was brought about and refined in stages by people who often came up with similar ideas independently. Captioned black-and-white and full-color illustrations, including the earliest known photograph, break up the text. Images by famed photographers such as Eadweard Muybridge and Mathew Brady, as well as Harold Edgerton's falling milk droplet, are included. The importance of these individuals' work and that of others is clearly explained. An illustrated center foldout shows the parts of a camera and how images are recorded. This is a terrific aid to report writers and an engaging read that will click with budding shutterbugs.-Anne Chapman Callaghan, Racine Public Library, WI Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780689828133
  • Publisher: Atheneum Books for Young Readers
  • Publication date: 10/1/2000
  • Series: Turning Point Inventions Series
  • Edition description: 1 ED
  • Pages: 80
  • Age range: 9 - 12 Years
  • Product dimensions: 9.36 (w) x 9.33 (h) x 0.47 (d)

Table of Contents

1
Before the Camera

2
The Pioneers

3
Through the Camera's Eye

4
Cameras for Everyone

5
Images of the Future

Further Reading

Index

Acknowledgments

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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 27, 2003

    Boring but informative

    I recently did a school science report on the camera and I needed srecicific info, and I had to use books. Though I eventually found what I needed in this book, it took me a long time and it was very bland and boring. Plus, further research informed me that much of the info I got from the book was false.

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