The Canterbury Tales (Turtleback School & Library Binding Edition)

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Overview

A retelling of the medieval poem about a group of travelers on a pilgrimage to Canterbury and the tales they tell each other.

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The Canterbury Tales

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Overview

A retelling of the medieval poem about a group of travelers on a pilgrimage to Canterbury and the tales they tell each other.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781417648238
  • Publisher: Demco Media
  • Publication date: 2/28/2003
  • Format: Library Binding
  • Edition description: THIS EDITION IS INTENDED FOR USE IN SCHOOLS AND LIBRARIES ONLY
  • Pages: 504
  • Product dimensions: 5.00 (w) x 7.60 (h) x 1.20 (d)

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 965 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(593)

4 Star

(138)

3 Star

(55)

2 Star

(73)

1 Star

(106)

Your Rating:

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 965 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    A fantastic translation of a classic

    I got an advance copy of this and have read the first few tales -- what an amazing translation. It's accessible and will be perfect for classroom studies or just catching up on a classic.

    9 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 15, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    A Worthwhile Journey

    Writing a "review" of The Canterbury Tales is difficult, not because the book/collection isn't worthy of a review, but because it is so widely variant and has so many nuances to be discussed.

    So what do you say in a brief review of The Canterbury Tales?

    To start with, I would suggest you try reading it in the original Middle English. The language/spelling/pronunciation can be a problem, so be sure you get an edition that's glossed (unless you're proficient in Middle English). During the semester, I found a "children's" edition of the tales at my local library. It included Modern English "translations" of a couple of the tales along with some illustrations. It was kind of fun to read, but it lost some of the rhythm and drive of the tales by having them in a modern format.

    The writing is fun and clever (once you get through the 'translation' issues with the Middle English). For a common reference, it's like reading Shakespeare, only more archaic by a couple hundred years. The language of the narrative varies depending on the narrator of the particular prologue/tale, but with Chaucer at the helm behind the scenes, the writing is generally very good, descriptive, layered, humorous, inspiring, etc. (except for when he's trying to illustrate 'bad writing', and then it's good in that it's so bad).

    The messages presented are widely varied as well. The Knight's Tale was an intriguing tale of romance and chivalry with lots of courtly intrigue...but at times it felt a little dry. The Miller and the Reeve were hilarious tales and introduced me to a new (to me) genre in the fabliau. The Wife of Bath had an interesting prologue and a fun tale, again with a semi-romantic style and an interesting moral. The Nun's Priest gave us a fun little animal fable. The Prioress presented a strange little tale about miracles or anti-semitism or devout love or something else?

    Overall, I would definitely recommend having a copy of The Canterbury Tales on your shelf. Some tales are easier to read than others. Some tales are more fun while others are more thought provoking (as stated in one of the prologues, a tale has one of two purposes, to educate or to entertain...and there are examples of each). Once you get your teeth into the language (probably the biggest hurdle) I suspect you'll enjoy these.

    8 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 26, 2009

    No More Trauma

    Great Translation = Forget your English class scars.

    8 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 3, 2008

    Great Chaucer literature.

    I read this book in my senior year of high school, quite honestly this book would go right over most people's heads(including me at first). The book was written in the 14th century so its understandable that the book's concepts are hard to grasp.But all an all I actually like the Canterbury tales once I re-read them and understood it better. This book takes time to really understand, however some people might right away but you should give it a chance, if you really want to read up on some great 14 century literature.

    5 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 12, 2001

    Delightful to Hear in the Recorded Books Edition

    This version will appeal most to those who have read and studied The Canterbury Tales and enjoyed them. The Canterbury Tales are best heard aloud. With commentary by Professor Murphy and talented actors, the various tales come appealingly alive. Chaucer¿s Middle English has its archaic words explained, and leaves the beauty of the meter and rhymes intact. The tales explore primarily relations between men and women, people and God, and consistently challenge hypocrisy. The tales also exemplify all the major story forms in use during the Middle Ages. The book¿s structure is unbelievable subtle and complex, providing the opportunity to peel the onion down to its core, one layer at a time. Modern anthologies look awfully weak by comparison. Although the material is old, the ideas are not. You will also be impressed by how much closer God was to the lives of these people than He is today. The renunciation at the end comes as a mighty jolt, as a result. My favorites are by the miller, wife of Bath, pardoner, and nun¿s priest. Where do you see the opportunity to give and share spiritual and worldly love? How can you give and receive more love? Donald Mitchell, co-author of The Irresistible Growth Enterprise and The 2,000 Percent Solution

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 22, 2012

    All translations are NOT created equal. I am brushing up on Chau

    All translations are NOT created equal. I am brushing up on Chaucer for a credit-by-exam option for my degree and wanted to make sure I was working off of the same translation as the professor. The translation he desired was Nevill Coghill's, Penguin's translation. That is the paperback version listed on the page. That is what I wanted. That is what I needed.

    When I saw that there was a nook version available in that edition I was ecstatic. Often it is difficult to find correct translations for many of my texts. I immediately previewed the version to double check and noticed, to my disgust, that the nook book version is just the B&N edition, NOT the penguin translation by Coghill. This is NOT clear on the page as the nook book is listed as an equivalent for the Penguin edition. I then also noticed that the "overview" section is also praising a different translator, not Coghill. As someone who is actually concerned about using accurate translations for academic purposes this is a problem. Varying editions of Chaucer can be VERY different. For example, I have a Bantam Classics, side-by-side translation that omits a number of the tales. Other translations change words and syntax to the point that it is unrecognizable and loses all of Chaucer's distinct tone. For people who actually read these classics for academics, it is a shame and a disgrace that a reputed bookseller would be careless enough to not pay credit to the correct translation and understand that there ARE in fact differences.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 26, 2011

    barns and noble fail at multi-version works!

    there are so many publications of this book in so many formats and translations that the b&n strategy of compositing data from all publications of the same name makes the site totally useless with regard to this kind of book. is it a side by side translation, annotated, something else? who knows. is it the translation by Hastings, Raffel, Wright, Ecker & Crook, Reeve & Shipman, or some one else? who knows!? they're all referenced! is it the complete tales or a selection of a few? it could be either according to the information presented by this site! b&n need to fix this bad.

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 17, 2012

    Raffel modern translation is excellent.

    I still prefer Coghill's translstion, bit Raffel's is a very close second.

    Many of the reviews here seem to be of a translation other than Raffel's. For example, some reviewers allude to a Middle English version. This indicates thst they are not reviewing Raffel's version.

    Perhaps B&N can sort this out. It id not only confusing but results in inaccurate reviews.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 9, 2008

    Simple

    Simply, this is a book recording the tales that people told one another during a pilgrimage from one place to another. It is very entertaining and a book that should be read by all.

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 17, 2011

    Stupid book

    Boring

    1 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 14, 2011

    Didn't Like

    I really don't recommend the Canterbury Tales at all. Of all eight tales, only four were "appropriate" and of those four, I liked two, The Knight's Tale and The Pardoner. These stories were bizarre and bad. I read a couple of pages into a tale, didn't like where it was going at all, and then skipped to the next one, not because I don't like reading or I'm lazy, but it just started going in a bad direction. I didn't read to see how those tales ended because I didn't want to know.
    Even if they were "clean," some were just too creepy. Another thing I didn't like was one of the because towards the end was just too long. This may sound stupid but, it just dragged it out. I don't if you ever read a book like that, but it's almost painful. I could kind of compare this tale to an Aesop's Fable, because it had a moral and the main characters were mostly animals, but the story just felt kind of dragged out by the end. I just kept thinking, "When is this going to end?" Usually I don't mind descriptiveness, but in The Nun's Priest's Tale, it was just a little too much.
    Also there was references to the Bible, then to Roman Gods, and then to Troy, which if I remember right, involved Greek Gods, which was altogether confusing. It was like there were several religions mixed in here, in a way where it seemed that everyone was of the same religion that involved many religions.
    There was some positive things though. As I mentioned above, Chaucer was very descriptive, which wasn't always a bad thing. In The Knight's Tale, it was very easy to envision in my mind. The begging was very slow, but it got better as I got in. I actually really did enjoy this story, even though it made me a little sad, and if it weren't for a couple other tales included in this book, it would probably have a lot higher ratings, at least from me.
    But sadly, there are other tales then The Knight's Tale, so I really wouldn't recommend this book. If you do read it, just read the beginning and the end tales. It's in the format of short stories, so all you would need to read is the prologue, which is fine. He goes into great detail here about what the characters are wearing, but it's just to give you a good idea of what they look like and what their character is like. Here though, I thought that he made the characters almost to what they weren't. They seemed a little too perfect and their tales didn't really match up to how he described and praised them.
    In conclusion, I wouldn't recommend this book, sadly, and if you do, be careful, because like I said before, I didn't like where some of those tales were going. Sadly I did not like The Canterbury Tales.

    1 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 2, 2015

    SunnyTooth ~Song~

    Posting on a phone, so that's why my post below won't disappear. Anyway, I heard this song theother day, and it just reminds me of BloodClan as a whole. They're Warriors. I don't know. Everyone else may think different, bu to me it'slike BloodClan's Theme Song. :P Well, here it is. Soldiers by Otherwise... <p>It's time to strap our boots on<br>
    This is a perfect day to die<br>
    Wipe the blood out of our eyes<p>

    In this life there’s no surrender<br>
    There’s nothing left for us to do<br>
    Find the strength to see this through<p>

    We are the ones who will never be broken<br>
    With our final breath<br>
    We’ll fight to the death<br>
    We are soldiers, we are soldiers<br>
    Woah woah woah whoa<br>
    We are soldiers<p>

    I stand here right beside you<br>
    Tonight we’re fighting for our lives<br>
    Let me hear your battle cry<br>
    Your battle cry<br>

    We are the ones who will never be broken<br>
    With our final breath<br>
    We’ll fight to the death<br>
    We are soldiers, we are soldiers<p>

    We are the ones who will not go unspoken (not go unspoken)<br>
    No, we will not sleep<br>
    We are not sheep<br>
    We are soldiers, we are soldiers<br>
    Yeah<p>

    We stand shoulder to shoulder<br>
    We stand shoulder to shoulder<br>
    We stand shoulder to shoulder<br>
    You can’t erase us<br>
    You’ll just have to face us<p>

    We stand shoulder to shoulder<br>
    We stand shoulder to shoulder<br>
    We stand shoulder to shoulder<br>
    You can’t erase us<br>
    You’ll just have to face us<p>

    We are the ones who will never be broken (never be broken)<br>
    With our final breath<br>
    We’ll fight to the death<br>
    We are soldiers, we are soldiers<p>

    We are the ones who will not go unspoken (not go unspoken)<br>
    No, we will not sleep<br>
    We are not sheep<br>
    We are soldiers, we are soldiers<br>
    Yeah<br>
    Woah woah woah whoa<br>
    We are soldiers<br>
    Woah woah woah whoa<br>
    We are soldiers<br>
    Woah woah woah whoa<br>
    We are soldiers

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 1, 2015

    WANNA GO?!

    Are you ACTIVE? What about DESCRIPTIVE? If you can answer yes to both, and you're feeling naughty (if you know what I mean) then go to "idfwu" result one. Don'5 mind the date, I got ground just after that post. But if you or someone does rp with Kate, I pronise to do more steamy events for y'all!!!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 1, 2015

    Shryke

    Yawned.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 2, 2015

    Seven

    Be warned Virus, I am extremely awesome and you will love me forever and forever and I will love you forever and ever. xD]

    Seven nuzzles Virus before closing her eyes, purring.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 28, 2015

    Korra ~ Homicide

    Twas a joke, Love.))

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 28, 2015

    Darkstar

    Grooms her dark red pelt her deep blue eyes glare at korra

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 26, 2015

    Darkstar

    She looks at armageddon and smiles.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 26, 2015

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 28, 2015

    Strange cat.

    Throws demon off easily and archs his back. Hissing furiously

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