The Carpenter's Gift: Read & Listen Edition

The Carpenter's Gift: Read & Listen Edition

4.8 8
by David Rubel, Jim LaMarche
     
 

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Family, friendship, and the spirit of giving are at the heart of this inspiring picture book-now available with Read & Listen audio narration. Opening in Depression-era New York, The Carpenter's Gift tells the story of eight-year-old Henry and his out-of-work father selling Christmas trees in Manhattan. They give one of their leftover trees to construction workers… See more details below

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Overview

Family, friendship, and the spirit of giving are at the heart of this inspiring picture book-now available with Read & Listen audio narration. Opening in Depression-era New York, The Carpenter's Gift tells the story of eight-year-old Henry and his out-of-work father selling Christmas trees in Manhattan. They give one of their leftover trees to construction workers building Rockefeller Center. That tree becomes the first Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree, the finest Henry has seen when adorned with homemade decorations. Henry wishes on the tree for a nice, warm house to replace his family's drafty, one-room shack. Through the kindness of new friends and old neighbors, Henry's wish is granted, and he plants a pinecone to commemorate the event. As an old man, Henry repays the gift by donating to Rockefeller Center the enormous tree that has grown from that pinecone. After bringing joy to thousands as a beautiful Christmas tree, its wood will be used to build a home for a family in need.

This ebook includes Read & Listen audio narration.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Ever since construction workers building New York’s Rockefeller Center put up a humble Christmas tree on site in 1931, the annual tradition has become a gift that keeps on giving. Author/historian Rubel’s story of a Depression-era family’s connection to that first tree—and the ripple effect of its bounties—puts the now magnificent symbol in perspective. LaMarche conveys emotional resonance with gauzy, soft-hued paintings of the inspirational proceedings. An afterword highlights Rockfeller Center owner Tishman Speyer’s recent partnership with Habitat for Humanity, which earmarks the tree to be milled for lumber post-Christmas for a family in need. Ages 5�8. (Sept.)
Children's Literature - Denise Hartzler
In this heartwarming tale readers are introduced to the Rockefeller Center Tree in New York City and given an early portrayal of Habitat for Humanity. The story is set in 1931 during the great Depression. Henry lives with his parents in an unheated shack outside the city. Henry's father borrows a truck, cuts down several trees and he and Henry go into the city to sell the trees as Christmas trees. At the end of the day Henry and his father donate unsold trees to construction workers at Rockefeller Center. With one tree left, the workers and Henry decorate the tree with homemade items. In the evening when the streetlights came on, the tree sparkles and in that moment Henry makes a Christmas wish. As Henry's Christmas wish comes true, he plants a pinecone. Readers will delight in seeing both Henry and a tree growing together. As time passes, Henry must make the decision on whether or not he should cut his special spruce tree to be the official Christmas tree of New York City's Rockefeller Center. The illustrations capture the tenderness of the people and of the season. This book is wonderfully written and beautifully illustrated. A Christmas treat for all family members! Reviewer: Denise Hartzler
School Library Journal
Gr 1�4—During the Great Depression in New York City, young Henry lives with his out-of-work parents in a drafty shack and sells Christmas trees with his father. Giving a tall tree to some friendly construction workers results in the workers helping to build a house for his family; years later, a pinecone Henry plants becomes a Rockefeller Center Christmas tree, which is then milled for wood to build a home for another needy family. Detailed characterizations and a straightforward tone keep the tender tale from becoming saccharine. LaMarche's almost impressionistic colored-pencil illustrations put readers in the midst of the action. Appendixes tell the true story of the origin of the Rockefeller Center tree and describe the mission of Habitat for Humanity International.—Linda Israelson, Los Angeles Public Library
Kirkus Reviews

An elderly man named Henry recalls the Christmas season of 1931 in this relatively long story that connects the Depression era to Habitat for Humanity via the enormous Christmas trees at Rockefeller Center in New York City.

A boy of 9 or 10, Henry lives with his parents in a tiny, unheated shack in the country. Henry helps his father cut down evergreen trees to take to the city to sell, and there they befriend some men working on the construction of Rockefeller Center. Together they decorate a makeshift Christmas tree; Henry's father gives the last of the trees to the workers. On Christmas morning the workers respond by arriving at Henry's home with materials to build a new house. The boy receives a hammer from one of the men, and Henry grows up to be a skilled carpenter himself. In a Dickensian series of coincidences, a huge tree on Henry's land is chosen as a Christmas tree for Rockefeller Center, with wood milled from the tree to be given to a family for their new house. Henry meets the young girl whose family will receive the wood and passes his treasured hammer on to her. Luminous illustrations in a large format have a muted, shimmering quality, especially in the concluding view of the magical tree at Rockefeller Center.

A sentimental but touching story with beautifully realized illustrations. (author's note)(Picture book. 5-9)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780375980671
Publisher:
RH Childrens Books
Publication date:
09/27/2011
Sold by:
Random House
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
36 MB
Note:
This product may take a few minutes to download.
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

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