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Cars
     

The Cars

4.6 7
by The Cars
 

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In the fall of 1978, punk stood confused by its lack of commercial acceptance. Enter the new wave, a challenging but potentially more radio-friendly sub-category. The Cars, a Boston fivesome, became the genre's defining success story. Their debut went platinum on the strength of their blend of traditional rock approaches (notably the dark romanticism and jagged

Overview

In the fall of 1978, punk stood confused by its lack of commercial acceptance. Enter the new wave, a challenging but potentially more radio-friendly sub-category. The Cars, a Boston fivesome, became the genre's defining success story. Their debut went platinum on the strength of their blend of traditional rock approaches (notably the dark romanticism and jagged textures of Roxy Music), the reinvigorated energy of punk, and leader Ric Ocasek's gift with the wrenching rock hook. The Cars' first song, a contrarily unboogiefied number called "Good Times Roll," captured the band's ambivalence nicely. But Ocasek's searing songs rolled over such subtexts, combining paeans to quirky sexuality ("My Best Friend's Girl") and unrequited lust ("All Mixed Up") with good old-fashioned explosive rock-radio candy ("You're All I've Got Tonight," "Just What I Needed").

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Greg Prato
The Cars' 1978 self-titled debut, issued on the Elektra label, is a genuine rock masterpiece. The band jokingly referred to the album as their "true greatest-hits album," but it's no exaggeration -- all nine tracks are new wave
ock classics, still in rotation on rock radio. Whereas most bands of the late '70s embraced either punk
ew wave or hard rock, the Cars were one of the first bands to do the unthinkable -- merge the two styles together. Add to it bandleader/songwriter Ric Ocasek's supreme pop sensibilities, and you had an album that appealed to new wavers, rockers, and Top 40 fans. One of the most popular new wave songs ever, "Just What I Needed," is an obvious highlight, as are such familiar hits as "Good Times Roll," "My Best Friend's Girl," and "You're All I've Got Tonight." But like most consummate rock albums, the lesser-known compositions are just as exhilarating: "Don't Cha Stop," "Bye Bye Love," "All Mixed Up," and "Moving in Stereo," the latter featured as an instrumental during a steamy scene in the popular movie Fast Times at Ridgemont High. With flawless performances, songwriting, and production (courtesy of Queen alumni Roy Thomas Baker), the Cars' debut remains one of rock's all-time classics.

Product Details

Release Date:
10/25/1990
Label:
Elektra / Wea
UPC:
0075596052429
catalogNumber:
135

Related Subjects

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Cars   Primary Artist
Ric Ocasek   Bass,Guitar,Rhythm Guitar,Vocals
Elliot Easton   Guitar,Vocals,Background Vocals
Greg Hawkes   Percussion,Keyboards,Saxophone,Vocals,Background Vocals
Benjamin Orr   Bass,Vocals
David Robinson   Drums,Vocals

Technical Credits

Ric Ocasek   Composer,Contributor
Greg Hawkes   Composer
Roy Thomas Baker   Producer
Nigel Walker   Engineer
Geoff Workman   Engineer
Marcia McGovern   Pre-production Coordinator
Ron Coro   Art Direction
Jerome Jordan   Collage

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

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The Cars 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is one of the most 'Radio Friendly' albums in history. This is good time rock&roll.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Just the first album itself can be summed up in one word (and a few exclaimation points): GREAT!!! The added bonus of the demos simply makes it more intriguing and more worth buying. I agree, "Wake Me Up" is great, "Hotel Queenie" is pretty good (and very fast - good album ender), but I think the two best of the last five are "You Just Can't Push Me" and "Take What You Want" (why didn't they ever release them?!!)...and both have Greg Hawkes on rhythm guitar -- how about that, huh? A must-have for ant Cars fan!
Guest More than 1 year ago
The Beatles and Nirvanna might have something to say about the best debut LP ever, but The Cars are right in there. Five of the nine tunes are hum-able classics. And given the context of the release, in the prime of the disco movement, while punk was fading, The Cars' effort succeeded in redirecting the punk philosophy to create a series of bands that established New Wave and enabled the birth of MTV. The lyrics aren't brilliant, but the catchy hooks laid on top of great guitar riffs, punctuated by electronics, and underscored by a punk attitude lay the groundwork for the pop/New Wave trend that dominated the early 1980s. This is a classic album that hasn't lost much in the past 20+ years. I'd put it in the top 50 best rock albums ever.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Unlike the rest of the cars offerings, this is a rockin' album all the way through. It may be new wave, but guitar riffs are awesome.
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