The Cartoon History of the Modern World Part 2: From the Bastille to Baghdad by Larry Gonick, Paperback | Barnes & Noble
The Cartoon History of the Modern World Part 2: From the Bastille to Baghdad
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The Cartoon History of the Modern World Part 2: From the Bastille to Baghdad

by Larry Gonick
     
 

From celebrated artist Lary Gonick, here is the extraordinary story of the modernworld, from the French Revolution to today.

More than thirty years ago, master cartoonist and historian Larry Gonick began the epic task of creating a smart, accurate, and entertaining illustrated history of the world. In this, the fifth and final book

Overview

From celebrated artist Lary Gonick, here is the extraordinary story of the modernworld, from the French Revolution to today.

More than thirty years ago, master cartoonist and historian Larry Gonick began the epic task of creating a smart, accurate, and entertaining illustrated history of the world. In this, the fifth and final book of this beloved and critically acclaimed series, Gonick finally brings us up to the modern day.

The Cartoon History of the Modern World, Part II picks up at the Enlightenment; continues through two and a half centuries of revolution, social and economic innovation, nationalism, colonialism, scientific progress, and the abolition of slavery; and concludes in the early twenty-first century with the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Essentially a college-level course in modern world history, with equal attention given to every area of the globe, Gonick's witty and engaging pages bring the past to life and put a brilliant new spin on our world. Whether you are a longtime fan or a first-time reader, this thrilling conclusion of our civilization's monumental story is not to be missed!

Editorial Reviews

Bryan Caplan
“Full of facts and wisdom, horror and humor….Gonick’s one-two punch of pictures and words isn’t just a gimmick; it makes it much easier to remember the facts of history. If we really wanted kids (or adults!) to learn history, we’d throw away our textbooks, and teach Gonick.”
K. Thor Jensen
“With limber pen and nimble mind, Larry Gonick completes a cartoon journey that started at the dawn of time. Brisk, informative, and hilarious, The Cartoon History Of The Modern World fills us in on exactly how we got so screwed up on a global scale.”
Jeffrey Brown
“Like any good historian, Larry Gonick seasons his facts with a good dose of perspective, and like any good cartoonist, he mixes his drama with a good dose of humor.”
Alex Robinson
“Gonick makes history fun for comic book nerds and comics readable for history nerds. If you’ve ever looked around this modern world and wondered how we got into this mess, it’s time to curl up with his latest book. You won’t even realize you’re learning—histo-tainment at its best.”
Booklist
“Lively cartooning and pretension-puncturing wit.”
Publishers Weekly
The final installment of Gonick's deeply funny and impeccably researched series has finally arrived, and like the rest of his Cartoon History series, the book covers a wide range of key and fascinating historical events and topics that have managed to slip through the gaps of common knowledge. The section linking the slave trade, the Haitian revolution and the Napoleonic Wars is particularly good, as are the segments on the modern history of Japan and China. Brilliantly funny, the series finds the inherent humor in history rather than pasting on irrelevant jokes. This is the most politicized book in the series, a jarring but perhaps unavoidable element, since it covers an era ending when Gonick sent the proofs to his publisher. Also, the pacing is odd and frequently rushed—it seems to need an extra hundred pages. Possibly as a result, the book has some interesting gaps. Most notably, aside from the occasional snide remark or allusion, the entire pre-Vietnam history of the United States is completely left out. While Gonick has covered these topics in depth in other books (the stand-alone Cartoon History of the United States) and perhaps tired of them, the absence is glaring. (Oct.)
Library Journal
With this typically wide-ranging, hilarious, and excellent volume, America's foremost exponent of educational comics finally completes his largest project, begun in 1977 with the first comic-book issue of his Cartoon History of the Universe. Perhaps because Gonick has published a separate Cartoon History of the United States, there's a strong focus on the rest of the world here. He looks in on 17th- and 18th-century Asia and Africa before digging into the complicated events of the French Revolution, the rise and fall of Napoléon, and the efforts leading to the abolition of slavery in England in 1833 (over 30 years before the United States managed it). After dealing with a variety of "isms" (socialism, anti-Semitism, electromagnetism), the modernization of Japan, and the inventions of the telegraph and the comic strip, Gonick does cover America's decisive involvement in World War II and ends with the 2003 invasion of Iraq (of which he's clearly critical). VERDICT At every step, Gonick offers comical, pomposity-skewering, and occasionally bawdy commentary, along with humorous footnotes on topics ranging from voodoo to Japanese beer. As always, highly recommended for adults.—S.R.
School Library Journal
Gr 10 Up–Funny, informative, and comprehensive, Gonick’s history concludes with this second volume. His unique wit, sense of irony, and passion for humanity’s complex story of triumphs, compromises, and disasters are as evident here as they are in his previous books. Together or separately, his cartoon histories will serve as a valuable introduction to the major events of the past, and perhaps as an insightful review of history. In Part II, Europe and North America get more attention than the rest of the world, but Gonick makes a concerted effort to cover the most significant events and trends in Africa, Asia, and South America, while not forgetting Australia and the island nations. His treatment of the 18th-century slave trade, with its enormously challenging economic, political, and moral issues, is particularly noteworthy. Equally impressive is his rendering of the rise and fall of communism around the globe. Throughout the book, readers will find textual and visual satire, puns, and other flashes of cleverness.–Robert Saunderson, formerly at Berkeley Public Library, CA

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780060760083
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
10/06/2009
Pages:
260
Sales rank:
296,574
Product dimensions:
7.20(w) x 9.10(h) x 0.80(d)
Age Range:
17 - 18 Years

What People are saying about this

K. Thor Jensen
“With limber pen and nimble mind, Larry Gonick completes a cartoon journey that started at the dawn of time. Brisk, informative, and hilarious, The Cartoon History Of The Modern World fills us in on exactly how we got so screwed up on a global scale.”
Bryan Caplan
“Full of facts and wisdom, horror and humor….Gonick’s one-two punch of pictures and words isn’t just a gimmick; it makes it much easier to remember the facts of history. If we really wanted kids (or adults!) to learn history, we’d throw away our textbooks, and teach Gonick.”
Alex Robinson
“Gonick makes history fun for comic book nerds and comics readable for history nerds. If you’ve ever looked around this modern world and wondered how we got into this mess, it’s time to curl up with his latest book. You won’t even realize you’re learning—histo-tainment at its best.”
Jeffrey Brown
“Like any good historian, Larry Gonick seasons his facts with a good dose of perspective, and like any good cartoonist, he mixes his drama with a good dose of humor.”

Meet the Author

Larry Gonick has been creating comics that explain math, history, science, and other big subjects for more than forty years. He has been a calculus instructor at Harvard (where he earned his BA and MA in mathematics) and a Knight Science Journalism Fellow at MIT, and he is currently staff cartoonist for Muse magazine. He lives in San Francisco, California.

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