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The Cash Nexus: Money and Power in the Modern World, 1700-2000
     

The Cash Nexus: Money and Power in the Modern World, 1700-2000

5.0 1
by Niall Ferguson
 

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ISBN-10: 0465023266

ISBN-13: 9780465023264

Pub. Date: 01/31/2002

Publisher: Basic Books

Conventional wisdom has long claimed that economic change is the prime mover of political change, whether in the age of industry or Internet. But is it? Ferguson thinks it is high time we re-examined the link-the nexus, in Thomas Carlyle's phrase-between economics and politics. His central argument is that the conflicting impulses of sex, violence, and power are

Overview

Conventional wisdom has long claimed that economic change is the prime mover of political change, whether in the age of industry or Internet. But is it? Ferguson thinks it is high time we re-examined the link-the nexus, in Thomas Carlyle's phrase-between economics and politics. His central argument is that the conflicting impulses of sex, violence, and power are together more powerful than money. Among Ferguson's startling claims are: · Nothing has done more to transform the world economy than war, yet wars themselves do not have primarily economic causes. · The present age of economic globalization is coinciding-paradoxically-with political and military fragmentation. · Financial crises are frequently caused by unforeseen political events rather than economic fluctuations. · The relationship between prosperity and government popularity is largely illusory. · Since political and economic liberalization are not self-perpetuating, the so-called triumph of democracy worldwide may be short-lived. · A bold synthesis of political history and modern economic theory, Cash Nexus will transform the landscape of modern history and draw challenging conclusions about the prospects of both capitalism and democracy.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780465023264
Publisher:
Basic Books
Publication date:
01/31/2002
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
576
Sales rank:
881,093
Product dimensions:
8.88(w) x 11.02(h) x 1.54(d)

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The Cash Nexus: Money and Power in the Modern World, 1700-2000 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Helen-Hafen More than 1 year ago
This book contains alot of good information, but, is lacking in comparitive studies with the United States on over half of the book including charts. I would suggest to the writer to do a second edition making those changes. Other than that, this is an excellent book for an macroeconomics course, and contributes to good welfare reform and welfare economics. Honestly, without the comparitive studies, I do not find this book very useful. As far as economics either macro or micro coming from the United States perspective I am at a loss for information and details. I can however compare its data with other data but the extra work I have to do in order to do that is overwhelming. Because of what I do as a welfare reform specialist I am willing to make that extra effort in research in order to improve my future efforts with more acurate welfare reform suggestions as I have in the past. You can read about my original welfare reform efforts and welfare economics in my book entitled, 'Why the Welfare System Fails' after it is published; until then look on the internet under Nevadans Acting For Welfare Reform in regards to welfare issues. Because The Cash Nexus lacks in these areas I mentioned, I do not see this book being very useful to others unless these changes are made. Without comparitive United States information alongside of other country information especially with the charts, it makes it very difficult to understand our position economically with the rest of the world. And being that all the world is connected economically on a higher macroeconomic scale and intricately dependant on all factors, good economics and research should reflect that. Reading this book makes me look at the United States blindly thus making this information almost useless. I however recommend its reading to coincide with my book and other macroeconomic books. It is good reading.