The Cat Of Bubasters by G.A. Henty | NOOK Book (eBook) | Barnes & Noble
The Cat Of Bubasters

The Cat Of Bubasters

3.0 1
by G.A. Henty
     
 
CONTENTS.


CHAPTER I. PAGE
The King of the Rebu 7

CHAPTER II.
The Siege of the City 26

CHAPTER III.
Captive 45

CHAPTER IV.
An Easy Servitude 64

CHAPTER V.
In Lower Egypt 83

CHAPTER VI.

Overview

CONTENTS.


CHAPTER I. PAGE
The King of the Rebu 7

CHAPTER II.
The Siege of the City 26

CHAPTER III.
Captive 45

CHAPTER IV.
An Easy Servitude 64

CHAPTER V.
In Lower Egypt 83

CHAPTER VI.
Fowling and Fishing 105

CHAPTER VII.
Hippopotamus and Crocodile 125

CHAPTER VIII.
The Conspiracy in the Temple 147

CHAPTER IX.
A Startling Event 164

CHAPTER X.
The Cat of Bubastes 185

CHAPTER XI.
Dangers Thicken 206

CHAPTER XII.
The Death of Ameres 224

CHAPTER XIII.
The Search for Mysa 245

CHAPTER XIV.
A Prince of Egypt 265

CHAPTER XV.
Ameres is Revenged 284

CHAPTER XVI.
Up the Nile 308

CHAPTER XVII.
Out of Egypt 329

CHAPTER XVIII.
The Desert Journey 349

CHAPTER XIX.
Home at Last 365

CHAPTER XX.
The King of the Rebu 384




THE CAT OF BUBASTES.




CHAPTER I.

THE KING OF THE REBU.


The sun was blazing down upon a city on the western shore of the
Caspian. It was a primitive city, and yet its size and population
rendered it worthy of the term. It consisted of a vast aggregation of
buildings, which were for the most part mere huts. Among them rose,
however, a few of more solid build and of higher pretensions. These
were the abodes of the chiefs and great men, the temples, and places
of assembly. But although larger and more solidly built, these
buildings could lay no claim to architectural beauty of any kind, but
were little more than magnified huts, and even the king's palace was
but a collection of such buildings closely adjoining each other.

The town was surrounded by a lofty wall with battlements and
loopholes, and a similar but higher wall girt in the dwellings of the
king and of his principal captains. The streets were alive with the
busy multitude; and it was evident that although in the arts of peace
the nation had made but little progress, they had in every thing
appertaining to war made great advances. Most of the men wore helmets
closely fitting to the head and surmounted by a spike. These were
for the most part composed of hammered brass, although some of the
headpieces were made of tough hide studded with knobs of metal. All
carried round shields--those of the soldiers, of leather stiffened
with metal; those of the captains, of brass, worked with considerable
elaboration.

In their belts all wore daggers, while at their backs were slung
quivers of iron; painted bows hung over one shoulder, and some had at
their waist a pouch of smooth flat stones and leather slings. Their
chief garment was a sort of kilt falling to the knee. Above the waist
some wore only a thin vest of white linen, others a garment not unlike
the nightgown of modern times, but with short sleeves. The kilt was
worn over this. Some had breastpieces of thick leather confined by
straps behind; while in the case of the officers the leather was
covered with small pieces of metal, forming a cuirass.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940013321632
Publisher:
SAP
Publication date:
10/23/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
294 KB

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The Cat Of Bubasters 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago