The Catharsis of Comedy (Greek Studies)

Overview

Comedy criticism has lacked a theoretical underpinning both to facilitate the work of interpretation and to generate a satisfactory mode of discourse. In The Catharsis of Comedy, Dana F. Sutton takes the initial steps toward the creation of a comprehensive theory that embraces a number of theoretical constructs and analytical techniques. Sutton begins with an examination of the ideas of such thinkers as Aristotle, Herbert Spencer, Sigmund Freud, and Krishna Menon. Once the workings of comic catharsis are ...
See more details below
This Hardcover is Not Available through BN.com
Sending request ...

Overview

Comedy criticism has lacked a theoretical underpinning both to facilitate the work of interpretation and to generate a satisfactory mode of discourse. In The Catharsis of Comedy, Dana F. Sutton takes the initial steps toward the creation of a comprehensive theory that embraces a number of theoretical constructs and analytical techniques. Sutton begins with an examination of the ideas of such thinkers as Aristotle, Herbert Spencer, Sigmund Freud, and Krishna Menon. Once the workings of comic catharsis are described, Sutton relates his new theory to other theories of comedy and humor, including the ideas of festival comedy set forth by Barber and Bakhtin, Lionel Abel's metatheater, and Konrad Lorenz's suggestion that humor originated in primate expressions of hostility. The result is a theory of enormous potential for the analysis of specific comedies, coupled with the creation of a vocabulary with which analytical discoveries can be discussed.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Journal Of Aesthetic Education
At its best, the book has a clear and functional account of the relationship of psychology and comedy.
— Ronald Berman, University of California
Journal Of Aesthetic Education - Ronald Berman
At its best, the book has a clear and functional account of the relationship of psychology and comedy.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

Meet the Author

Dana F. Sutton is Professor and Chair of Classics at the University of California, Irvine, and author of Self and Society in Aristophanes and The War of the Generations in Ancient Comedy.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Introduction 1
1 Comic Catharsis in Antiquity: The Tractatus Coislinianus 7
2 The Nature of Laughter 17
3 The Special Nature of Comic Catharsis 33
4 The Ridicule Process: An Initial Overview 41
5 A Comic Surrogate is Established 49
6 The Surrogate must be Perceived to Represent the Target 51
7 The Spectator must be Induced to Feel Superior to the Target 55
8 The Surrogate Renders Bad Feelings Available for Purgation 69
9 More about Bad Feelings 75
10 Laughter Purges the Spectator of Bad Feelings 81
11 The Spectator's Feelings about the Surrogate Become Transferred to the Target 89
12 Catharsis and Plot 95
13 Catharsis and Society 99
Bibliography of Works Consulted 119
Index 125
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)