The Cauliflower Chronicles: A Grappler's Tale of Self-Discovery and Island Living

The Cauliflower Chronicles: A Grappler's Tale of Self-Discovery and Island Living

4.1 9
by Marshal D. Carper
     
 

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When Marshal Carper broke up with his long-time girlfriend, he packed up his white belt in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu and moved from rural Pennsylvania to Hilo, Hawaii to train at the BJ Penn MMA Academy.

The Cauliflower Chronicles follow Carper's adventures and misadventures, both on the mat and around the island. He quickly learns that Hawaii is not the carefree

Overview

When Marshal Carper broke up with his long-time girlfriend, he packed up his white belt in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu and moved from rural Pennsylvania to Hilo, Hawaii to train at the BJ Penn MMA Academy.

The Cauliflower Chronicles follow Carper's adventures and misadventures, both on the mat and around the island. He quickly learns that Hawaii is not the carefree paradise advertised in brochures and finds himself feeling like a foreigner in his own country. On the mat, he experiences Hawaiian fight culture from the inside, goes head to head with BJ Penn, and struggles to overcome injuries. Off the mat, he explores the Hawaiian Independence movement and the effects of colonization, battles with giant cockroaches and centipedes, meets a myriad of colorful locals, and travels the island in the bed of the Red Baron—a rusted 1986 Mazda pick-up truck.

At times sad, shocking, and laugh out-loud funny, The Cauliflower Chronicles is a must-read for both sports fans and travel buffs, showing a side of mixed martial arts and Hawaii not available anywhere else.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780982565872
Publisher:
Victory Belt Publishing
Publication date:
12/01/2010
Edition description:
Original
Pages:
310
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.80(d)

Meet the Author

Marshal D. Carper grew up in southwestern Pennsylvania running from bullies and playing video games. Now, much to the surprise of his family, former bullies and himself, he trains in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu and writes about fighting. Carter is the editor-in-chief of Lockflow.com.

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The Cauliflower Chronicles: A Grappler's Tale of Self-Discovery and Island Living 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 9 reviews.
Bakari More than 1 year ago
I read this book over the weekend and thoroughly enjoyed it. It is fast paced and the author keeps the story moving. This book is one of many stories out there that shows how BJJ or submission grappling can change, cause us to alter or even disrupt our lives so we can train. Carper's adventure took place in a colorful setting (Hawaii) but a lot of it reminds me of the experiences and thoughts we all share as grapplers. We need more stories like these and as a grappling fanatic I know that I will purchase every book that comes out. Posted by Bakari Akil II, Ph.D., (Jiujitsu365), author of The Lazy Man's Guide to Grappling Grappling for Newbies: What every new BJJ and Submission Grappler should know!
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I bought this book, excited to read about Hilo since I have also been there. However, this book was terrible! There was absolutely nothing engaging about it. It was bland and simple. The only time it wasn't simple was when they were talking about jiu jitsu. For someone who has no experience in martial arts, it was difficult to know what he was talking about. He doesn't describe anything that involves the actual fights. In the beginning of the book, he was talking about how BJ Penn was able to get his opponent to submit to him in a 3 minutes (I believe that was the number). If you don't know anything about the fights than you don't know whether or not be impressed. Marshal is not a likable character at all. He seemed almost bipolar, swinging from pathetic to angry. I was had to force myself to continue reading. There are also several mistakes in the book itself, like using "breaks" instead of "brakes" and "peaking" instead of "peeking." Normally, things such as this would not bother me but there are so many errors that I could not handle it. Poorly written, poorly execute and a poor excuse for a book.