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The Cavalry Battle That Saved the Union: Custer vs. Stuart at Gettysburg

Overview

Why did Robert E. Lee send Pickett's men on a seemingly suicidal frontal attack against the Union center at Gettysburg?

Here is the answer to this question, which has perplexed legions of Civil War buffs.

Paul D. Walker reveals Lee's true plan for a Confederate victory: a simultaneous strike against the Union center from two directions--Pickett's infantry charging the front, while Stuart's cavalry struck the rear. The frontal assault by Pickett...

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Overview

Why did Robert E. Lee send Pickett's men on a seemingly suicidal frontal attack against the Union center at Gettysburg?

Here is the answer to this question, which has perplexed legions of Civil War buffs.

Paul D. Walker reveals Lee's true plan for a Confederate victory: a simultaneous strike against the Union center from two directions--Pickett's infantry charging the front, while Stuart's cavalry struck the rear. The frontal assault by Pickett went off as scheduled, but as Stuart's forces approached, they encountered a Union cavalry contingent. As the forces joined, there was a sudden and violent collision. Then, at the head of the Northern force, emerged one of the most dynamic figures in American history, George Armstrong Custer.

What followed was America's greatest cavalry battle: 7,500 Confederate horsemen ranged against 5,000 Union cavalry--Jeb Stuart against George Custer--with the outcome of the battle at Gettysburg, and possibly the entire Civil War, at stake.

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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Walker (formerly with the U.S. Army's armored cavalry) describes Lee's battle plan for Gettysburg, the unforeseen encounter with a Union cavalry contingent, the battle that ensued, and its implications for the rest of the War. Black-and-white photographs, maps, and an order of battle listing support the narrative. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781589800120
  • Publisher: Pelican Publishing Company, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 4/30/2002
  • Pages: 160
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 8.80 (h) x 0.72 (d)

Meet the Author

A distinguished military graduate of Missouri State University, Paul D. Walker served two tours in Vietnam and went on to a thirty-year career in the armored cavalry division, earning sixteen awards for valor and achievement. He earned master’s degrees in both international relations and public administration from Shippensburg University and taught political science and history at a local university in Salt Lake City. He is a member of the Civil War Round Table, Veterans of Foreign Wars, Purple Heart Society, Vietnam Veterans of America, and American Legion. He has published two additional books on military strategy and history with Pelican: The Cavalry Battle That Saved the Union: Custer vs. Stuart at Gettysburg and Truman’s Dilemma: Invasion or The Bomb. Walker resides in Salt Lake City, Utah.

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 6, 2009

    Pickett's charge up the center, on the 3rd day of the Gettysburg Battle was only half of Lee's plan. The Confederate General had also ordered a Cavalry strike on the Union rear to win the battle and end the war.

    Historians have incorrectly described the Battle of Gettysburg as an overwhelming Union victory, when in fact the battle's outcome was extremely close. For his conduct of the battle on the 3rd day, Robert E. Lee has been heavily criticized for ordering General Pickett to launch an assault on the Union center with no hope of success. What most historians over-look is that Lee had also ordered a simultaneous attack from the rear by 7,000 cavalry led by the popular hero Jeb Stuart. If newly promoted General George Armstrong Custer had been late arriving on the field, Lee's plan would have succeeded and Gettysburg might have been the site of a crucial Confederate victory, one that would have changed the course of American history.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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