The Cavendish Home for Boys and Girls

Overview

At the Cavendish Home for Boys and Girls, you will definitely learn your lesson. A dark, timeless, and heartfelt novel for fans of Coraline and The Mysterious Benedict Society.

Victoria hates nonsense. There is no need for it when your life is perfect. The only smudge on her pristine life is her best friend Lawrence. He is a disaster—lazy and dreamy, shirt always untucked, obsessed with his silly piano. Victoria often wonders why she ever ...

See more details below
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (49) from $1.99   
  • New (20) from $1.99   
  • Used (29) from $1.99   
The Cavendish Home for Boys and Girls

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$7.99
BN.com price
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.

Overview

At the Cavendish Home for Boys and Girls, you will definitely learn your lesson. A dark, timeless, and heartfelt novel for fans of Coraline and The Mysterious Benedict Society.

Victoria hates nonsense. There is no need for it when your life is perfect. The only smudge on her pristine life is her best friend Lawrence. He is a disaster—lazy and dreamy, shirt always untucked, obsessed with his silly piano. Victoria often wonders why she ever bothered being his friend. (Lawrence does too.)

But then Lawrence goes missing. And he’s not the only one. Victoria soon discovers that The Cavendish Home for Boys and Girls is not what it appears to be. Kids go in but come out…different. Or they don’t come out at all.

If anyone can sort this out, it’s Victoria—even if it means getting a little messy.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
The too-serene-to-be-true town of Belleville harbors some creepy secrets in Legrand's debut, a sinister and occasionally playful tale of suspense. Twelve-year-old perfectionist Victoria Wright has bouncy curls, a fixation on achieving straight As, and just one friend—unkempt, artistic Lawrence, who she considers her "personal project." But when Lawrence disappears, and Victoria launches an investigation to find him, she discovers more frightening trouble than she imagined. Victoria unravels the mystery behind the titular home for children, which is run by the ageless Mrs. Cavendish and a fiendish gardener/assistant. Hair-raising adventures involving slimy hidden passageways, pinching swarms of cockroaches, mystery meat, and the wrath of cruel Mrs. Cavendish fill the pages. Legrand gives Victoria's mission a prickly energy, and her descriptions of the sighing, heaving home—a character in itself—are the stuff of bad dreams. Watts's b&w illustrations of spindly characters, cryptic shadows, and cramped corridors amplify the unsettling ambiance, and her roach motif may have readers checking their arms. Ages 10–up. Agent: Diana Fox, Fox Literary. (Sept.)
Sarah Prineas
The Cavendish Home for Boys and Girls is weirdly charming and creepy. I loved the intrepid girl hero Victoria and her determination to save her best friend from the scariest Home ever. An enormously fun—and shivery—read.
From the Publisher
The Cavendish Home for Boys and Girls is weirdly charming and creepy. I loved the intrepid girl hero Victoria and her determination to save her best friend from the scariest Home ever. An enormously fun—and shivery—read.

"A heartwarming friendship tale—played out amid carpets of chittering insects, torture both corporal and psychological, the odd bit of cannibalism and like ghoulish delights. A thoroughgoing ickfest, elevated by vulnerable but resilient young characters and capped by a righteously ominous closing twist."

" The too-serene-to-be-true town of Belleville harbors some creepy secrets in Legrand's debut, a sinister and occasionally playful tale of suspense. Legrand gives Victoria's mission a prickly energy, and her descriptions of the sighing, heaving home—a character in itself—are the stuff of bad dreams. Watts's b&w illustrations of spindly characters, cryptic shadows, and cramped corridors amplify the unsettling ambiance, and her roach motif may have readers checking their arms."

"Insidiously creepy, searingly sinister, and spine-tinglingly fun, this book also presents a powerful message about friendship and the value of individuality."

Kirkus Reviews
A heartwarming friendship tale--played out amid carpets of chittering insects, torture both corporal and psychological, the odd bit of cannibalism and like ghoulish delights. Being practically perfect in every way and someone who "never walked anywhere without extreme purpose," 12-year-old Victoria resolutely sets about investigating the sudden disappearance of her scruffy classmate and longtime rehabilitation project Lawrence. After troubling encounters with several abruptly strange and wolfish adults in town, including her own parents, she finds herself borne into the titular Home by a swarm of 10-legged roachlike creatures. This abduction quickly leads to the discovery that it's not an orphanage but a reform school. There, for generations, local children have had qualities deemed undesirable beaten or frightened out of them by sweet-looking, viciously psychotic magician/headmistress/monster bug Mrs. Cavendish. Victoria is challenged by a full array of terror-tale tropes, from disoriented feelings that things are "not quite right" and "[s]harp, invisible sensations, like reaching fingers" to dark passageways lined with rustling roaches and breakfast casseroles with chunks of…meat. A thoroughgoing ickfest, elevated by vulnerable but resilient young characters and capped by a righteously ominous closing twist. (Horror fantasy. 11-13)
Children's Literature - Bonita Herold
Victoria strives for perfection. She considers herself to be perfect--product of a perfect home in a perfect town with perfect grades--and considers others imperfect. Friendship is messy, so she has no friends--unless you count Lawrence, a music-loving, unkempt classmate who is more of a project than a friend. And then she gets a B. Life is no longer perfect for her. And then Lawrence goes missing. His parents claim he is with his grandparents, but Victoria does not buy it. She gets nosy. Nosiness leads her to the lovely Mrs. Cavendish, who is in charge of the Home for Boys and Girls. People act very peculiar, cockroaches run rampant, and Victoria wonders if she imagines the horror. Is she having nightmares? Can walls really move? Nothing adds up! While the book about friendship and individuality runs a little long, it will easily capture the attention of young readers wanting tingles up their spines. Reviewer: Bonita Herold AGERANGE: Ages 9 to 13.
School Library Journal
Gr 5–8—A paradigm of perfection-with straight As, gleaming blond curls, and an unshakable sense of purpose-12-year-old Victoria expects everything and everyone to be just so. Friends are particularly messy, so she has opted to have only one. Lawrence is a disheveled, music-loving dreamer whom she views as a "personal project" in need of fixing. When Lawrence goes missing, Victoria investigates and soon unearths dreadful secrets lurking beneath the surface of her picture-perfect community. The adults are behaving oddly, numerous children have disappeared, and nasty creepy-crawlies are popping up everywhere. Victoria's sleuthing leads her to the local orphanage and into the flawlessly manicured grasps of Mrs. Cavendish, the malevolent, magic-using headmistress who snatches less-than-perfect children from their homes and reforms them through a nightmare-inducing regime of physical and psychological punishments. Once Victoria uncovers the awful truth, she must face her own greatest fears-and also learn to reach out to others-to save the day. Beginning with the uneasy realization that things are not quite right, gradually incorporating disquieting discoveries, and escalating into full-out horror (the children are fed chopped-up body-part casseroles), the suspense and sense of dread build to the satisfying (and also unsettling) conclusion. Shadow-filled black-and-white illustrations and the occasional bug scampering across the text intensify the eeriness. Insidiously creepy, searingly sinister, and spine-tinglingly fun, this book also presents a powerful message about friendship and the value of individuality.—Joy Fleishhacker, School Library Journal
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781442442917
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster Books For Young Readers
  • Publication date: 8/28/2012
  • Pages: 352
  • Sales rank: 510,848
  • Age range: 10 - 12 Years
  • Lexile: 750L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 5.60 (w) x 8.40 (h) x 1.20 (d)

Meet the Author

Sarah Watts is an illustrator of fabric lines, books, and other printed delights. She is married to an adventure junkie and she collects old treasures. Sarah is also the Alumni Board of Trustee member for Ringling College of Art and Design (RACD).

Claire Legrand used to be a musician until she realized she couldn’t stop thinking about the stories in her head. Now a writer, Ms. Legrand can often be found typing with purpose at her keyboard, losing herself in the stacks at her local library, or embarking upon spontaneous adventures to lands unknown. Her first novel is The Cavendish Home for Boys and Girls, a New York Public Library Best Book for Children in 2012. She is also the author of The Year of Shadows and Winterspell. Claire lives in New Jersey with a dragon and two cats. Visit her at Claire-Legrand.com.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

Cavendish Home for Boys and Girls

WHEN VICTORIA WRIGHT WAS TWELVE YEARS OLD, she had precisely one friend. In fact, he was the only friend she had ever had. His name was Lawrence Prewitt, and on Tuesday, October 11, of the year Victoria and Lawrence were twelve years old, Lawrence disappeared.

Victoria and Lawrence became friends shortly after Lawrence’s first gray hairs appeared. They were both nine years old and in fourth grade. Thick and shining, Lawrence’s gray hairs sprouted out from between his black, normal hairs and made him look like a skunk. Everyone made fun of Lawrence for this, and really, Victoria couldn’t blame them. Victoria decided that these hairs were a cosmic punishment for Lawrence’s inability to tuck in his shirt properly, use a comb, pay attention in class (he preferred to doodle instead of take notes), and do anything but play his wretched piano. Not that Lawrence was bad at piano; in fact, he was very good. But Victoria had always thought it an incredible waste of time.

After a few weeks of watching Lawrence’s gray hairs sprout thicker and thicker, and hearing everyone’s snickers, Victoria put aside her general dislike of socializing with, well, anyone, and decided that Lawrence would be her personal project. Obviously, the boy needed help, and Victoria prided herself on telling people what to do with themselves. Sacrificing her valuable time to fix Lawrence would be a gift to the community of Belleville. “How charitable of you, Victoria,” people would say, and beam at her and wish their children could be like her.

So, at lunch one day, Victoria marched from her lonely table to Lawrence’s lonely table and said, “Hello, Lawrence. I’m Victoria. We’re going to be friends now.”

Victoria almost shook Lawrence’s hand but then thought better of it because she feared he might very well be infested with lice or something. Instead, she sat down and opened her milk carton, and when Lawrence looked at her through his skunkish hair and said, “I don’t really want to be your friend,” Victoria said, “Well, that’s too bad for you.”

Over the years, Victoria pushed herself into Lawrence’s life and was pushed out of it when he decided that enough was enough, and then pushed herself back in, and finally they were really, truly friends, in an odd sort of way.

Every weekday morning, they met at the crossing of Silldie Place (Victoria’s street) and Bourdon’s Landing (Lawrence’s street) and walked together to school. Most mornings, their conversation went something like this:

“Honestly, Lawrence,” Victoria would say, leading him briskly down the cobbled walk, for Victoria never walked anywhere without extreme purpose, “can’t you tuck in your shirt?”

Sometimes it would be, “Can’t you comb your hair?” or “How do you manage to get past your parents with those ugly shoes?” or “Did you finish your essay on the Byzantine Empire for extra credit like you were supposed to, or did you spend the entire weekend playing that silly piano?”

And Lawrence would roll his eyes or cuff her on the shoulder and say, “Good morning to you, too, Vicky,” which Victoria hated. She abhorred nicknames, especially that one. She also abhorred how Lawrence was always chewing on something, like a toothpick or pen or whatever nasty things he pulled from his pockets.

Nobody liked Lawrence, because he never really bothered to make friends. He lived in a dreamer’s world of ivory keys and messy shirts, unconcerned with the people around him. Those gray hairs of his didn’t help matters. He didn’t seem to mind what anyone thought of him, though. He didn’t seem to mind about much at all except for his piano—and Victoria. For Victoria’s twelfth birthday, Lawrence had written her a long letter and read it aloud right in front of her. It was full of jokes and funny stories, at which Victoria tried not to laugh too loudly, and that was all well and good, till the end happened.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 18 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 19, 2012

    Cthh

    I love this book, and not because my teachers step niece wrote it!!! I am not lieing and my classmate will propbaly write to. This is an awesome scary book, but it is very good. You will not beable to put it down!!!!! This is for middle schoolers... Grades 6-8 but an adult will like it too... This is Claire' s first book and if you keep on posting good coments, she will write more. If you didn't like this book, please state one reason why.



    See your post later!!!

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 4, 2013

    Best book ever

    STOP WHAT YOU'RE DOING AND BUY THIS BOOK

    This is probably one of the best books i have ever read. I am 11 and it is a little scary but amazing!!!!!!!!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 2, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    this is amazing

    this book is amazing and i really really loved the scarienss and the independince of the main charecter and how she figures out things is just plain awesome

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 21, 2013

    Great story!

    Though set for a younger age group than me, I still greatly enjoyed this exciting tale full of mystery and plot twists. A fun story for anyone who loves the supernatural and mystery!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 7, 2013

    Originally posted at Nose in a Book. This book came highly reco

    Originally posted at Nose in a Book.

    This book came highly recommended to me by one of my dear friends. Even with that recommendation I was wary of starting. Mostly because my TBR list is already forever long and I put a lot of thought into adding another book to the list. Okay, who are we kidding, of course I add a lot of books to it. Reason my Goodreads list is currently pushing 400. All of that being said, I am thrilled my friend recommended this book to me. I can tell you I would have never ever picked this up on my own for various reasons; however, I am glad I did. This is a really good/thrilling YA book.

    The Cavendish Home For Boys and Girls is at its heart the story of Victoria. Victoria who hates most things, including her only true friend Lawrence. She doesn't even consider Lawrence a friend, she considers him a project that she needs to fix because he isn't perfect and often troublesome (to her). One day, however, Lawrence disappears. His parents have a cover story, but even to Victoria the story sounds fake. She is convinced there is more to this story than Lawrence's parents are letting on. This becomes more obvious when more of Victoria's class disappears.

    Victoria starts to research this when it becomes obvious. She notices people go into the Cavendish Home for Boys and Girls, but they rarely come out. When Victoria begins to research this, she notices she has much in common with the owner of the home, Mrs. Cavendish. This is a fact that ends up worrying Victoria, because she hates who Mrs. Cavendish is. Slowly Victoria herself becomes trapped in the Home and starts to break her down. Victoria, the one who always must be strong, starts to break down because of what the house, and Mrs. Cavendish, do to people once they become stuck there.

    The ending is amazing and very fitting to the story and will make you look at common aspects of your house twice. Also, have I mentioned the illustrations? They are perfect and even fit the story perfectly. Sarah Watts perfectly captured the tone of the story in an illustration. I only wish Legrand had other YA/MG books out right now for me to read!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 1, 2014

    Amazing

    I recomend this book

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 14, 2014

    Hmm

    I had a hard time determining what age group this book would be appropriate. It was interesting, but slow moving. The language felt age 10 appropriate, but there were a number of really dark scenes. I didn't dislike it, but it wasn't a favorite. Parents with mild children may want to read it first. Also, if the target age IS 10-ish, it is quite long.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 17, 2013

    Mya B.

    DUN DUN DUN!!!!!!!!!!!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 17, 2012

    'Tis the Season for Scary

    The Cavendish Home for Boys and Girls is a delicious treat of a story. The kind that you know you should put down to do important, adult things, but you just can’t stop. You may keep reading, even when you feel a little sick. It is, without question a book written for its middle grade audience. But, if you are the kind of adult who thinks there might be something just a little bit wrong with teaching a child to always color inside the lines, who thinks that maybe just maybe the whole world is drowning in Stepford-esque suburbia, then this is the book for you. If you hope you are that particular adult who would be the cool teacher, or the one who never could quite follow all the directions, then Professor Alban and Mr. Tibbalt will be two of your favorite supporting heroes.

    Victoria and Lawrence have the sort of co-ed friendship that makes them seem as though they’ve been married for fifty years, and their loyalty to each other supports that notion. While the plot seems a bit contrived at times, the friendship between the two of them never did. It was Lawrence’s character that made the book worthwhile for me, a true hero–even if he did need Victoria’s rescue.

    This is truly a horror story where evil threatens innocence, then uses all its nasty devices and monsters to flush love out and eat it. While it’s unlikely that Ms. Cavendish and her home could exist in real life, the reader is left with a strange, haunting feeling that perhaps there are other forms of her just next door.

    Ms. Legrand is a master of scenery, and this reader suspects more than a few middle grade trick or treaters will pass estate lots on Halloween night and be on the lookout for strange trees and roaches.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 21, 2012

    Creepy

    I don't recommend this for kids under11. This book SERIOUSLY creeped me out.
    Super freaky....

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 14, 2012

    Highly Recommend - a must read!

    This book is definitely a page turner but is not for the faint of heart. A scary story about a creepy orphanage this book is eerily fun and the heroine Victoria is most definitely a girl determined to find out what is going on and solve the mystery of what has happened to her best friend Lawrence.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 6, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Claire Legrand's debut is as astonishingly well written as it is

    Claire Legrand's debut is as astonishingly well written as it is quirky, dark, and endearing. The character of Victoria struggled with making her outside match her insides, and her growing friendship with Lawrence hit all the right, tearjerking notes. The fantastic characters are set inside a world creepy enough to thrill Tim Burton, with Mrs. Cavendish and the Home waiting with surprises around every corner. This is a home run of a middle grade novel, once I can't imagine disappointing readers of that age - or any age. Such a weird, fun time.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 5, 2012

    Great writing, character development, and hat tips to other grea

    Great writing, character development, and hat tips to other great novels!!!

    I'm in my mid-twenties, so this book was slightly out of age range for me. But this book is well written, creepy, and by the end I was speedily sweeping my fingers over my iPad screen with excitement as the pace picked up for a great finish. The character build up is fantastic, and it's very obvious this isn't just a story. The heroine is strong, stubborn, and a delight to get to know throughout the novel. I remember being just like her in middle school. The plot isn't easily predictable, and keeps the reader engaged.

    Overall, I'd recommend the book to anyone. It's a great read for any audience with a perfect amount of spunk and spook!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 26, 2012

    I couldn't put this book down! The characters are brillliant, th

    I couldn't put this book down! The characters are brillliant, the
    setting vivid, and the plot kept me in constant suspense. I'd definitely
    reccomend it to elementary- and middle-schoolers, though to be honest I
    am in highschool and still enjoyed it quite a bit. I'll be keeping an
    eye out for more works by this author; I can't wait to see what she
    comes out with next!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 23, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 28, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 15, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 23, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 18 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)