The Celebration Of The Fantastic

Overview

The Celebration of the Fantastic reaffirms the wide range and validity of the subject, treatment, and approach that the fantastic demands. Twenty-five essays, selected from among the more than 230 presented at the Tenth Anniversary Conference of the IAFA, consider writers as diverse as Stephen King, Doris Lessing, Rudyard Kipling, Loren Eiseley, Mary Stewart, Bernard Malamud, Orson Scott Card, Toni Morrison, Henry James, and Ray Bradbury as well as television personalities, film directors, and German and ...

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Overview

The Celebration of the Fantastic reaffirms the wide range and validity of the subject, treatment, and approach that the fantastic demands. Twenty-five essays, selected from among the more than 230 presented at the Tenth Anniversary Conference of the IAFA, consider writers as diverse as Stephen King, Doris Lessing, Rudyard Kipling, Loren Eiseley, Mary Stewart, Bernard Malamud, Orson Scott Card, Toni Morrison, Henry James, and Ray Bradbury as well as television personalities, film directors, and German and Hungarian visual artists. Also included are essays on science fiction writers Robert Silverberg, Joe Haldeman, and Greg Bear.

Some of the more provocative work is on Feminist Fantasy and Open Structure, The Greatest Fantasy on Earth: The Superweapon in Fiction and Fact, Virtual Space and Its Boundaries in Science Fiction Film and Television, The Fantastic in German Democratic Republic Literature, Csontvary: The Painter of the Sun's Path, and The Shaman in Modern Fantasy. The essays illustrate the essential theme of the fantastic: the testing of the limits of civilization and the questioning of commonly accepted values and ideas as writers and artists explore the hidden and the repressed.

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Product Details

Meet the Author

DONALD E. MORSE is Professor of English and Rhetoric at Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan.

MARSHALL B. TYMN is Professor of English at Eastern Michigan University.

CSILLA BERTHA is Associate Professor of English and Irish at Lajos Kossuth University, Debrecen, Hungary.

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Table of Contents

Illustrations
Preface
Introduction. Celebrating the Fantastic: This "Enormous and Seductive Subject" 1
1 Theory 7
Victoria and Modern Fantasy: Some Contrasts 9
The Greatest Fantasy on Earth: The Superweapon in Fiction and Fact 23
Pagan Survival: Why the Shaman in Modern Fantasy? 39
Some Thoughts on Modernism and Science Fiction (Suggested by Robert Silverberg's Downward To the Earth) 49
Godmaking in the Heartland: The Backgrounds of Orson Scott Card's American Fantasy 61
2 Myth and Legend 71
"What Dreams May Come?": Relativity of Perception in Doris Lessing's Briefing for a Descent into Hell 73
Kipling's Myth of Making: Creation and Contradiction in Puck of Pook's Hill 81
Mithraic Aspects of Merlin in Mary Stewart's The Crystal Cave 91
Dolorous Strokes, or, Balin at the Bat: Malamud, Malory, and Chretien 103
Autobiography as Science Fiction: The Strange Case of Loren Eiseley 113
3 The Supernatural 121
The Fifth Child: Lessing's Subversion of the Pastoral 123
The Ghost and the Self: The Supernatural Fiction of Henry James 133
Toni Morrison's Beloved: Rememory, History, and the Fantastic 141
4 Visual Arts: Painting, Film, and Television 149
Csontvary, the Painter of the "Sun's Path" 151
Eros and Thanatos: The Art of Alfred Kubin on the Edge of the Other Side 165
Fantasy According to "Mister Roger's Neighborhood" and In the Night Kitchen 183
Virtual Space and its Boundaries in Science Fiction Film and Television: Tron, "Max Headroom," and WarGames 191
Giving the Devil More Than His Due: The Witches of Eastwick as Fiction and Film 205
The Monomyth in Time Travel Films 211
5 Science Fiction 219
Astronauts, Angels, and Time Machines: The Fantastic in Recent German Democratic Republic Literature 221
Legitimate Sequels: Character Structures and The Subject in Greg Bear's Sequel Novels 237
Joe Haldeman: Cyberpunk Before Cyberpunk Was Cool? 251
6 Fantasy and Horror 259
Feminist Fantasy and Open Structure in Monique Wittig's Les Guerilleres 261
Art Versus Madness in Stephen King's Misery 271
Homage to Melville: Ray Bradbury and the Nineteenth-Century American Romance 279
Select Bibliography on the Fantastic 291
Index 295
About the Editors and Contributors 303
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